2019 Bills


HB19-1009 Substance Use Disorders Recovery 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: Friday, May 3 2019
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE (CONTINUED)
(1) in senate calendar.
Short Title: Substance Use Disorders Recovery
Sponsors: C. Kennedy | J. Singer / K. Priola | B. Pettersen
Summary: The bill: Expands the housing voucher program currently within the department of local affairs to include individuals with a substance use disorder and appropriates $4.3 million each of the next 5 fiscal years to support the program (section 1); Requires each recovery residence operating in Colorado to be licensed by the department of public health and environment (section 2); and Creates the opioid crisis recovery fund for money the state receives as settlement or damage awards resulting from opioid-related litigation (section 3).
Status: 5/23/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1012 DPA Department Of Personnel Flexible Administration Of Controlled Maintenance Payments 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: DPA Department Of Personnel Flexible Administration Of Controlled Maintenance Payments
Sponsors: S. Beckman | A. Valdez / R. Fields
Summary: The bill grants the state architect, through the executive director of the department of personnel, flexibility in administering the payment of certain controlled maintenance projects from the proceeds of the lease-purchase agreements executed as required by Senate Bill 17-267.
Status: 3/11/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1015 Recreation Of The Colorado Water Institute 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Recreation Of The Colorado Water Institute
Sponsors: J. Arndt / J. Ginal
Summary: The Colorado water institute was created in 1981 and automatically repealed in 2017. The bill recreates the institute.
Status: 2/20/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1016 Basic Skills Placement Tests For High School 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position: Amend
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Basic Skills Placement Tests For High School
Sponsors: T. Geitner
Summary: Under existing law, an institution of higher education (institution) is required to administer basic skills placement or assessment tests (tests) in English and math to matriculated students. The institution must select the tests from among those that meet standards established by the Colorado commission on higher education (CCHE). The bill prohibits an institution from using tests that are not available for use by school districts and high schools, including early colleges. CCHE must ensure that this requirement is included in the standards for these tests.
Status: 1/31/2019 House Committee on Education Postpone Indefinitely

HB19-1025 Limits On Job Applicant Criminal History Inquiries 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Limits On Job Applicant Criminal History Inquiries
Sponsors: J. Melton | L. Herod / M. Foote | R. Rodriguez
Summary: The bill prohibits employers from: Advertising that a person with a criminal history may not apply for a position; Placing a statement in an employment application that a person with a criminal history may not apply for a position; or Inquiring about an applicant's criminal history on an initial application
Status: 5/31/2019 Governor Became Law

HB19-1032 Comprehensive Human Sexuality Education 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: Friday, May 3 2019
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(1) in senate calendar.
Short Title: Comprehensive Human Sexuality Education
Sponsors: S. Lontine | Y. Caraveo / N. Todd | D. Coram
Summary:

The bill moves provisions of the statutory legislative declaration to a nonstatutory legislative declaration.

The bill clarifies content requirements for public schools that offer comprehensive human sexuality education and prohibits instruction from explicitly or implicitly teaching or endorsing religious ideology or sectarian tenets or doctrines, using shame-based or stigmatizing language or instructional tools, employing gender norms or gender stereotypes, or excluding the relational or sexual experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender individuals.

Current law provides for a comprehensive human sexuality education grant program. The bill amends certain provisions of the grant program to:

  • Require the department of public health and environment to submit an annual report concerning the outcomes of the grant program indefinitely;
  • Add 8 representatives to the oversight entity and require membership of the oversight entity to be comprised of at least 7 members who are members of groups of people who have been or might be discriminated against;
  • Require grant applicants to demonstrate a need for money to implement comprehensive human sexuality education; and
  • Require that rural public schools or public schools that do not currently offer comprehensive human sexuality education receive priority when selecting grant applicants.

The bill provides a general appropriation of at least $1 million annually for the grant program.

The bill prohibits the state board of education from waiving the content requirements for any public school that provides comprehensive human sexuality education.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/31/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1083 Athletic Trainers License 
CU Lobbyist: Jerry
CU Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Athletic Trainers License
Sponsors: E. Hooton | K. Van Winkle / A. Williams | J. Cooke
Summary: The bill changes the terms describing the regulation of athletic trainers from "registration" to "license" and "licensure" and from "registrant" and "registered athletic trainer" to "licensee".
Status: 3/28/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1086 Plumbing Inspections Ensure Compliance 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position: Amend
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Plumbing Inspections Ensure Compliance
Sponsors: M. Duran / B. Pettersen
Summary: Current law requires plumbing inspectors employed by qualified state institutions of higher education to possess the same qualifications required of state plumbing inspectors. Section 1 of the bill requires the same of inspectors employed by an incorporated town or city, county, or city and county. Section 2 requires state plumbing inspectors or plumbing inspectors employed by the state, an incorporated town or city, county, city and county, or qualified state institution of higher education (entity) to conduct a contemporaneous review of each plumbing project inspected to ensure compliance with the plumbing law, including specifically licensure and apprentice requirements. However, each entity need not perform a contemporaneous review for each inspection of a project. Each entity shall develop standard procedures to advise inspectors on how to conduct a contemporaneous review. Each entity must post its standard procedures on its public website and provide the director of the division of professions and occupations within the department of regulatory agencies with a link to the web page on which the standard procedures have been posted.
Status: 4/16/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1088 Modify Income Tax Credit Health Care Preceptors 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Modify Income Tax Credit Health Care Preceptors
Sponsors: P. Buck | D. Valdez / K. Donovan
Summary:

The bill makes the following modifications to the existing income tax credit for health care preceptors working in health care professional shortage areas:

  • Clarifies the definition of "preceptorship" to specify that the period of time for which the period of personalized instruction, training, and supervision must be provided to be eligible to claim the tax credit is not less than 4 working weeks or 20 business days per calendar year; and
  • Extends the existing sunset date under which the tax credit would expire to tax years commencing prior to January 1, 2023.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/30/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1105 Nurse Practitioner Workers' Compensation 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Nurse Practitioner Workers' Compensation
Sponsors: K. Mullica | L. Saine / V. Marble | F. Winter
Summary: The bill allows an advanced practice nurse with prescriptive authority to obtain level I accreditation under the "Workers' Compensation Act of Colorado".
Status: 4/4/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1119 Peace Officer Internal Investigation Open Records 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position: Pending
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Peace Officer Internal Investigation Open Records
Sponsors: J. Coleman / M. Foote
Summary: The bill makes an internal investigation file (file) of a peace officer for in-uniform or on-duty conduct that involves a member of the public subject to an open records request. The bill requires some information to be redacted before complying with the open records request. The bill allows the custodian of the file to first provide a summary of the file to the requester and then allows the requester access to the file after the requester has reviewed the summary. Under the bill, a custodian of a file in which there is an ongoing criminal case can deny inspection of the file. The file becomes open for inspection after all the charges are dismissed or the defendant is sentenced.
Status: 4/12/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1153 Colorado Mountain College And Direct Grants Annexation 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Colorado Mountain College And Direct Grants Annexation
Sponsors: J. McCluskie | J. Wilson / K. Donovan | B. Rankin
Summary: The bill changes the role and mission of Colorado mountain college from authorizing no more than 5 baccalaureate degree programs, as determined by its board, to authorizing a limited number of baccalaureate degree programs, as determined by its board. After a local college district annexes a school district or group of school districts into the local college district, for at least 5 years after annexation, the bill requires the Colorado commission on higher education to annually consider recommending increases to the direct grant amount appropriated to a local college district to reflect increases in resident enrollment. Prior to recommending the increase, the commission shall consult the affected local college district.
Status: 4/5/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1168 State Innovation Waiver Reinsurance Program 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: State Innovation Waiver Reinsurance Program
Sponsors: J. McCluskie | J. Rich / K. Donovan | B. Rankin
Summary: The bill authorizes the commissioner of insurance to apply to the secretary of the United States department of health and human services for a state innovation waiver, for federal funding, or both, to allow the state to implement and operate a reinsurance program to assist health insurers in paying high-cost insurance claims. The state cannot implement the program absent waiver or funding approval from the secretary. The program is established as an enterprise for purposes of section 20 of article X of the state constitution. The division of insurance is to include an update regarding the program in its annual "SMART Act" report, and the program is subject to sunset review and repeal in 5 years.
Status: 5/17/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1174 Out-of-network Health Care Services 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Out-of-network Health Care Services
Sponsors: D. Esgar | M. Catlin / B. Gardner | B. Pettersen
Summary:

The bill:

  • Requires health insurance carriers, health care providers, and health care facilities to provide patients covered by health benefit plans with information concerning the provision of services by out-of-network providers and in-network and out-of-network facilities;
  • Outlines the disclosure requirements and the claims and payment process for the provision of out-of-network services;
  • Requires the commissioner of insurance, the state board of health, and the director of the division of professions and occupations in the department of regulatory agencies to promulgate rules that specify the requirements for disclosures to consumers, including the timing, the format, and the contents and language in the disclosures;
  • Establishes the reimbursement amount for out-of-network providers that provide health care services to covered persons at an in-network facility and for out-of-network providers or facilities that provide emergency services to covered persons;
  • Creates a penalty for failure to comply with the payment requirements for out-of-network health care services; and
  • Appropriates money from the general fund to the department of public health and environment and from the division of insurance cash fund to the division of insurance.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/14/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1183 Automated External Defibrillators In Public Places 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Automated External Defibrillators In Public Places
Sponsors: D. Roberts / J. Bridges
Summary: The bill defines a public place and encourages any person that owns, operates, or manages a public place to place functional automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in sufficient quantities to ensure reasonable availability for use during perceived sudden cardiac arrest emergencies. The bill requires any public place to accept any gift, grant, or donation of an AED that meets federal standards. The department shall award a $75,000 contract to a nonprofit organization for the purpose of acquiring and distributing AEDs to public places. The bill extends good samaritan protections to a variety of persons and entities. The bill repeals an obsolete provision that encouraged school districts to acquire an AED and moves that provision to article 51 of title 25. The bill also repeals an obsolete provision that provided limited immunity to persons rendering emergency assistance through the use of an AED.
Status: 5/22/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1196 Financial Aid For Students With In-state Tuition 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Financial Aid For Students With In-state Tuition
Sponsors: S. Gonzales-Gutierrez / D. Moreno
Summary:

Under existing law, a student who does not have lawful immigration status who attended high school in Colorado for at least 3 years before graduating from a Colorado high school or before successfully completing a high school equivalency examination, is admitted to a qualifying institution of higher education within 12 months after high school graduation, and has submitted an affidavit stating that the student has applied for lawful presence or will apply as soon as he or she is eligible, must be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes. Such a student is eligible for the college opportunity fund program upon verification of the student's uniquely identifying student number and may be eligible for institutional or private financial aid programs.

The bill makes such a student eligible for certain student financial assistance programs offered by the department of higher education to in-state students. Prior to becoming eligible, the student is subject to the same verification requirements for eligibility to participate in the college opportunity fund program.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/13/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1206 Higher Education Supplemental Academic Instruction 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Higher Education Supplemental Academic Instruction
Sponsors: J. Coleman | C. Larson / J. Bridges | P. Lundeen
Summary:

The bill directs the Colorado commission on higher education (commission) to adopt a developmental education policy requiring the governing boards of state institutions of higher education (institutions) to maximize the likelihood of success in entry-level (gateway) college-level course work when placing students into developmental education. The bill also specifies that institutions cannot place a student into developmental education based on a single instrument or test.

For institutions authorized to offer developmental education, this bill requires that, by 2022, such institutions shall directly enroll no more than 10 percent of students enrolling in the institution into stand-alone developmental education courses that may extend the student's time to degree. Instead, a student should be enrolled in a gateway college-level course with additional supports through supplemental academic instruction (SAI) or co-requisite remediation.

The bill allows institutions to pilot new approaches to remediate students who may not benefit from SAI or co-requisite remediation and to seek waivers from the commission to expand or duplicate successful pilots.

The bill authorizes all 4-year institutions to offer SAI, without approval from the commission, to students who need additional supports to be successful in college-level courses.

The bill clarifies and adds reporting requirements relating to developmental education and SAI.

The bill changes the term "basic skills" in statute to "developmental education" and makes conforming amendments throughout.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/25/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1211 Prior Authorization Requirements Health Care Service 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Prior Authorization Requirements Health Care Service
Sponsors: D. Michaelson Jenet | Y. Caraveo / A. Williams
Summary:

With regard to the prior authorization process used by carriers or private utilization review organizations (organizations) acting on behalf of carriers to review and determine whether a particular health care service prescribed by a health care provider is approved as a covered benefit under the patient's health benefit plan, the bill requires carriers and organizations to:

  • Publish and update their prior authorization requirements and restrictions;
  • Comply with deadlines established in the bill for making a determination on a prior authorization request;
  • Use current, clinically based prior authorization criteria that are aligned with other quality initiatives of the carrier or organization and with other carriers' and organizations' prior authorization criteria for the same health care service; and
  • Consider limiting the use of prior authorization to providers whose prescribing or ordering patterns differ significantly from the patterns of their peers after adjusting for patient mix and other relevant factors.

The bill authorizes a carrier or organization to offer providers with a history of adherence to the carrier's or organization's prior authorization requirements an alternative to prior authorization, including an exemption from prior authorization for providers with an 80% approval rate of prior authorization requests over the previous 12 months. Carriers and organizations are to annually reevaluate a provider's eligibility for exemption from or other alternative to prior authorization requirements.

If a carrier or organization fails to make a determination within the time required, the request is deemed approved.

An approved prior authorization request is valid for at least 180 days, with some exceptions, and continues for the duration of the authorized course of treatment and the covered person's plan year.

The commissioner of insurance is authorized to adopt rules as necessary to implement the bill.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/13/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1239 Census Outreach Grant Program 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Census Outreach Grant Program
Sponsors: K. Tipper | Y. Caraveo / K. Priola | F. Winter
Summary:

In the division of local government (division) the bill creates the 2020 census outreach grant program (grant program) in the department of local affairs (department) to provide grants to local governments, intergovernmental agencies, councils of government, housing authorities, school districts, and nonprofit organizations (eligible recipients) to support the accurate counting of the population of the state for the 2020 census.

The department, in coordination with the grant program committee (committee), which is also created in the division, is required to implement and administer the grant program and to develop policies and procedures necessary for such implementation and administration.

The committee is created in the division to make recommendations to the department regarding the policies and procedures to review grant applications and to make recommendations to the department regarding which applications to approve for the grant award. The committee consists of 7 members, 3 of whom are appointed by the governor and 4 of whom are appointed, one each, by the speaker of the house of representatives, the president of the senate, and the minority leaders of the house of representatives and the senate, although such appointees may not be members of the general assembly.

The bill specifies that eligible recipients may use grant money to conduct 2020 census outreach, promotion, and education to focus on hard-to-count communities in the state and to increase the self-response rate and accuracy of the 2020 census. Eligible recipients may also use grant money to further award grants to other local governments, intergovernmental agencies, councils of government, housing authorities, school districts, or nonprofit organizations.

To receive a grant, an eligible recipient must submit an application to the department in accordance with the policies and procedures developed by the department. The bill specifies the information that an application must include at a minimum.

The committee is required to review the applications received and to make recommendations to the department regarding which grant applications to approve. In developing its recommendations, the committee is required to consider whether the eligible recipient will be conducting outreach in hard-to-count communities and the size and geographic and demographic diversity of the hard-to-count communities in which outreach, education, and promotion of the 2020 census will occur as provided by all eligible recipients that receive grant money.

Subject to available appropriations and in accordance with the recommendation of the committee, the department is required to award grants for the purposes of the grant program on or before November 1, 2019, and to distribute the grant money to eligible recipients that were awarded grants within 30 days after the grants are awarded.

Each eligible recipient that received a grant through the grant program is required to submit a report to the department including information to be determined by the department. The department is required to submit a report to the local government committees of the senate and the house of representatives, or any successor committees, and to the governor regarding the census outreach conducted through the grant program.

For the 2019-20 fiscal year, the bill directs the general assembly to appropriate $6 million to the department to award grants to eligible recipients for the purposes of the grant program. In addition, the department may solicit, accept, and expend gifts, grants, or donations from private or public sources for the purposes of the grant program.

On or before May 1, 2026, and on or before May 1 every 10 years thereafter, the department and the office of the governor are required to develop a strategic action plan, including a discussion of necessary funding for the plan, for outreach and promotion for a successful count of the population in Colorado during the upcoming decennial census.

The bill appropriates $6 million from the general fund to the department for use by the division. The appropriation is based on the assumption that the division will require an additional 1.4 FTE and associated direct and indirect costs of administering the grant program.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/23/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1241 University of Colorado Training And Scholarships Rural Physicians 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: University of Colorado Training And Scholarships Rural Physicians
Sponsors: B. Buentello | J. Wilson / J. Ginal | D. Hisey
Summary:

The bill requires the university of Colorado school of medicine (school) to provide scholarships to students who:

  • Will complete clinical studies in a rural or frontier area in Colorado;
  • Have demonstrated financial need; and
  • Have committed in writing to living and serving as physicians in rural or frontier areas in Colorado that are also primary care health professional shortage areas for at least 4 years following the completion of their residency training.

The bill requires the school to submit an annual written report to the education committees of the house of representatives and senate concerning the operation of the school's rural track during the preceding academic year.


(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 5/9/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed

HB19-1257 Voter Approval To Retain Revenue For Ed & Transp 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Voter Approval To Retain Revenue For Ed & Transp
Sponsors: K. Becker | J. McCluskie / L. Court | K. Priola
Summary:

Beginning with the 2019-20 fiscal year, the bill authorizes the state to annually retain and spend all state revenues in excess of the constitutional limitation on state fiscal year spending that the state would otherwise be required to refund. The bill is a referendum that will be submitted to the voters at the statewide election held on November 5, 2019, and approval of the ballot title at the election constitutes a voter-approved revenue change to the constitutional limitation on state fiscal year spending.

If approved, an amount of money equal to the state revenues retained under this measure is designated as part of the general fund exempt account. The general assembly is required to appropriate or the state treasurer is required to transfer this money to provide funding for:

  • Public schools;
  • Higher education; and
  • Roads, bridges, and transit.

Legislative council staff will be required to specify this retained amount and its associated uses in an annual report that it currently prepares related to revenue retained and spent under referendum C. In addition, the state auditor is required to contract with a private entity to annually conduct a financial audit regarding the use of the money that the state retains and spends under this measure.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/5/2019 Sent to the Governor

HB19-1258 Allocate Voter-approved Revenue For Education & Transportation 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Allocate Voter-approved Revenue For Education & Transportation
Sponsors: K. Becker | J. McCluskie / L. Court | K. Priola
Summary:

The bill is contingent on voters approving a related referred measure to annually retain and spend state revenues in excess of the constitutional spending limit. If the measure passes, in years when the state retains and spends revenue under the authority of the measure there will be additional revenue in the general fund exempt account (account). Section 1 of the bill requires 1/3 of this money in the account to be allocated to each of the purposes approved by voters, which are:

  • Public schools;
  • Higher education; and
  • Roads, bridges, and transit.

The general assembly is required to appropriate the money for public schools and higher education for the state fiscal year after the state retains the revenue under the authority of the voter-approved revenue change. The money appropriated for public schools must be distributed on a per pupil basis and used by public schools only for nonrecurring expenses for the purpose of improving classrooms, and it may not be used as part of a district reserve.

The state treasurer is required to transfer the remaining 1/3 of the money to the highway users tax fund (HUTF) after the state treasurer receives a report certifying the state's TABOR revenues (report). Section 3 clarifies that the report must include the money that the state keeps and spends as a result of the 2019 measure, and that this amount must be reported separately from the referendum C money in the account.

Under section 4 the money the state treasurer transfers to the HUTF is allocated 60% to the state highway fund, 22% to counties, and 18% to cities and incorporated towns. Under section 5 no more than 90% of the money allocated to the state highway fund may be expended for highway purposes or highway-related capital improvements and at least 15% must be expended for transit purposes or for transit-related capital improvements.

Section 2 includes a conforming amendment to ensure that the allocation for the referendum C money does not apply to any new revenue in the account as a result of the 2019 voter approval.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/3/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1262 State Funding For Full-day Kindergarten 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: State Funding For Full-day Kindergarten
Sponsors: J. Wilson | B. McLachlan / J. Bridges | R. Fields
Summary:

Under existing law, the school finance formula provides funding for half-day kindergarten educational programs plus a small additional amount of supplemental kindergarten funding. The bill provides funding through the school finance formula for full-day kindergarten educational programs. A student enrolled in a full-day kindergarten educational program will be funded at the same amount as students enrolled full-time in other grades. A student enrolled in a half-day kindergarten educational program will be funded as a half-day student plus the existing amount of supplemental kindergarten funding.

Under existing law, many school districts charge parents of students enrolled in full-day kindergarten a fee to fund the full-day kindergarten educational program. After passage of the bill, a school district or a charter school that provides a full-day kindergarten educational program shall not charge fees for attending kindergarten other than those fees that are routinely charged to parents of students enrolled in other grades and are applicable to the kindergarten educational program. However, if the general assembly stops funding kindergarten students as full-time pupils, then a school district or charter school may resume charging a fee or tuition for the unfunded portion of the school day.

Under existing law, a school district may use a half-day preschool position to enroll a child in full-day kindergarten. The bill prohibits using a preschool position to enroll a child in full-day kindergarten. A school district that used preschool positions in this manner in the 2018-19 budget year will retain the positions in the 2019-20 budget year and budget years thereafter to the extent the school district fills the positions with preschool students.

The bill directs a school district that is not offering a full-day kindergarten educational program as of the 2019-20 school year to submit a plan to the department of education addressing how it could phase in a full-day kindergarten educational program, but a school district is not required to offer a full-day kindergarten educational program.

If a charter school seeks to expand an existing half-day kindergarten educational program to full day, it must notify the charter authorizer and amend the charter contract, if necessary. If the authorizer objects to the program expansion, the charter school and the authorizer must negotiate a change to the charter contract. If the parties cannot agree, the charter school may appeal the issue to the state board of education for a determination. Any renegotiation of the charter school's contract must be limited to the issue of expanding the kindergarten educational program.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/21/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1273 Colorado Partnership For Quality Jobs And Services Act 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Colorado Partnership For Quality Jobs And Services Act
Sponsors: D. Esgar / L. Garcia | B. Pettersen
Summary:

The bill creates the "Colorado Partnership for Quality Jobs and Services Act" to facilitate the creation of formal labor-management partnership agreements between state employees in the state personnel system and the executive branch of state government. The bill specifies that certain employees in the state personnel system, due to the nature and responsibilities of their jobs, are not able to participate in partnership agreements. State employees who are allowed to participate in partnership agreements are designated covered employees.

Partnership units: The bill specifies that a partnership unit is a group of covered employees who have similar job classifications and who are in a unit for representation by a nonprofit organization that represents covered employees (employee organization). The bill creates partnership units composed of covered employees in specified occupational groups.

If a partnership unit was created pursuant to the existing Colorado executive order that authorizes partnership agreements (executive order) and the partnership unit has chosen an employee organization to exclusively represent it (certified employee organization), the partnership unit will continue to be represented by its existing certified employee organization.

Certified employee organizations: An employee organization that wants to represent an unrepresented partnership unit may file a petition with the department of labor and employment (department) requesting that it hold an election to allow covered employees in the partnership unit to elect an employee organization to represent it. The department is required to provide notice of the petition and other employee organizations may be included on the ballot in the election.

The department is required to conduct an election to determine which employee organization will be the certified employee organization of the partnership unit. The ballot must allow covered employees to vote not to be represented by an employee organization. If one employee organization receives a majority of the votes, the department is required to certify the employee organization as the certified employee organization of the partnership unit.

The bill specifies circumstances under which the department is not allowed to hold an election for a partnership unit to select a certified employee organization. The bill also specifies that a covered employee or an employee organization may initiate a process to decertify a certified employee organization for a partnership unit.

Rights of covered employees and certified employee organizations: The bill specifies that a covered employee may work with an employee organization and communicate with other covered employees to form a partnership agreement. Certified employee organizations have the right to reasonable access to areas where covered employees work to hold meetings, post notices, and provide information to covered employees.

Duties of the certified employee organization: The bill specifies that a certified employee organization is required to represent the interests of all covered employees in the partnership unit, regardless of membership in the employee organization. The bill also specifies the process by which a covered employee may initiate a grievance regarding the interpretation of a partnership agreement. In addition, the bill prohibits a certified employee organization from engaging in a strike, work stoppage, or group sickout against the state or any of its agencies or departments.

Duties of the state: The bill specifies that the state is required to:

  • Make payroll deductions for membership dues and other payments that covered employees authorize to be made to the certified employee organization;
  • Notify the certified employee organization when a covered employee is hired, promoted, or transferred to a new partnership unit;
  • Periodically provide specified information about covered employees to each certified employee organization;
  • Allow a certified employee organization to attend orientations for new covered employees;
  • After the state and the certified employee organization reach a partnership agreement, submit a request to the general assembly for sufficient appropriations to implement terms of the partnership agreement requiring the expenditure of money; and
  • Engage in good faith in all aspects of the partnership process.

Partnership agreements: A certified employee organization and the state are required to discuss and draft written partnership agreements, which are binding on the state, the certified employee organization, and covered employees. Partnership agreements that govern matters impacting all covered employees in all of the represented partnership units are required to be negotiated collaboratively with all certified employee organizations; except that a certified employee organization may opt out of joint negotiations for the partnership units it represents.

A partnership agreement is required to provide a grievance procedure to resolve disputes over the interpretation, application, and enforcement of any provision of the partnership agreement. A partnership agreement is also required to continue in full force and effect until it is replaced by a subsequent partnership agreement.

If disputes arise during the formation of a partnership agreement, the certified employee organization and the state are required to engage in the dispute resolution process established by the bill.

Duties of the state personnel director: The state personnel director (director) is required to enforce certain aspects of the partnership agreement process. The director is authorized to conduct hearings to adjudicate disputes regarding the rights of covered employees and the rights and duties of certified employee organizations and the state under partnership agreements. The director is required to determine and impose appropriate administrative remedies to address violations of rights or duties pursuant to the "Colorado Partnership for Quality Jobs and Services Act".

Court review: The bill specifies the circumstances under which the director or a party to a partnership agreement may request court review of the final action of the director or an arbitrator's decision and specifies the standards under which the court may conduct such review. Court review may be requested as follows:

  • The director may request that the court of appeals enforce orders issued by the director in connection with partnership agreements;
  • Any person or party affected by a final rule, order, or decision of the director may appeal to the district court for further relief;
  • A party to a partnership agreement may seek enforcement or vacation of an arbitrator's decision on a grievance concerning the interpretation, application, and enforcement of a partnership agreement in district court; and
  • Either the state or a certified employee organization may challenge the final judgment of an arbitrator's judgment resolving a dispute in the formation of a partnership agreement in district court.
    (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 5/9/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed

HB19-1278 Modifications To Uniform Election Code 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Modifications To Uniform Election Code
Sponsors: S. Lontine / S. Fenberg
Summary:

The bill makes changes to the "Uniform Election Code of 1992" (code), including changes to procedures for voter registration, ballot access requirements, political party organization filing requirements, procedures for in-person voting, requirements for the content of an election plan, procedures for curing ballots, and requirements for curing recall petitions. The formulas and hours for drop boxes and voter service and polling centers are revised. The bill allows a 17-year-old who is preregistered and who will be 18 on the date of the next general election to vote in a primary, and allows a person to seek a court order to keep polling locations open past the regular closing time on election day when voting at or access to a polling location has been substantially impaired. The bill makes additional technical changes and corrections to the code.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/29/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1294 Transfer Apprenticeship Credit To College Credit 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Transfer Apprenticeship Credit To College Credit
Sponsors: A. Benavidez | S. Jaquez Lewis / T. Story
Summary:

The bill requires the chief administrative officer of the Colorado community college system, or his or her designee, to convene a working group to determine the most efficient and appropriate manner in which to facilitate the transfer of earned construction industry registered apprenticeship program credit to college credit. If possible, the chief administrative officer shall include representatives from varying community colleges, area technical schools, local district colleges, relevant 4-year institutions that grant bachelor degrees, applicable union and non-union labor organizations, and other interested parties. The working group is required to meet during the interim following the first regular session of the seventy-second general assembly. The bill specifies issues in connection with the transfer of earned construction industry registered apprenticeship program credits to college credit that the working group is required to consider.

The working group is required to solicit input from subject matter experts, including, but not necessarily limited to, labor organizations, community college administrators, and people who are in or have completed registered apprenticeship programs. The working group is also required to submit to the general assembly its recommendations for the most efficient and appropriate manner in which to facilitate the transfer of earned construction industry registered apprenticeship program credits to college credit, including any recommendations for necessary legislation.

The money appropriated for purposes of the working group is exempt from the matching requirement for student financial assistance. In addition, the department of higher education is required to enter into a fee-for-service contract for the purposes of the working group.

For the 2019-20 state fiscal year, the bill appropriates $15,000 to the department of higher education from the general fund.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/28/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1312 School Immunization Requirements 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: School Immunization Requirements
Sponsors: K. Mullica / J. Gonzales | K. Priola
Summary:

The bill requires the department of public health and environment (department) to:

  • Develop a standardized form and submission process to claim a medical exemption to an immunization; and
  • Develop a standardized form and submission process to claim a religious or personal belief exemption to an immunization.

The department is:

  • Required to develop educational materials regarding immunizations to distribute to health care providers and facilities;
  • Required to present immunization exemption information during its annual SMART Act hearing; and
  • Required to use the existing immunization tracking system.

The state board of health is:

  • Required to promulgate rules adopting the medical exemption recommendations from the advisory committee on immunization practices of the centers for disease control and prevention in the federal department of health and human services, or any successor entity (ACIP);
  • Required to promulgate rules adopting the the hepatitis A, rotavirus, and meningococcal immunizations; and
  • Allowed to promulgate rules establishing the timing by which schools, parents, legal guardians, and students must demonstrate compliance with immunization requirements.

Concerning the immunization tracking system, the bill:

  • Requires a licensed physician, physician assistant, or advanced practice nurse to inform a parent or legal guardian who is claiming a medical exemption that he or she may choose to exclude the student's immunization information from the immunization tracking system before the student's immunization data is sent to the immunization tracking system;
  • Requires the department or local or county, district, or municipal public health agency to inform a parent, legal guardian, or student who is claiming a religious or personal belief exemption that he or she may choose to exclude the student's immunization information from the immunization tracking system before the student's immunization data is sent to the immunization tracking system; and
  • Requires a practitioner who is a licensed physician, physician assistant, or advanced practice nurse to submit immunization and medical exemption data to the immunization tracking system. However, the practitioner is not subject to a regulatory sanction for noncompliance.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/2/2019 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments

HB19-1319 Incentives Developers Facilitate Affordable Housing 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Incentives Developers Facilitate Affordable Housing
Sponsors: S. Bird | H. McKean / F. Winter | D. Hisey
Summary:

Not later than October 15, 2019, section 2 of the bill requires each state agency and state institution of higher education to submit to the capital development committee (committee) a list of all nondeveloped real property owned by or under the control of the agency or institution. The bill defines "nondeveloped real property" to mean unimproved real property that is not otherwise protected for or dedicated to another use such as an access or a conservation easement.

Not later than October 15 of each year thereafter, the bill requires each agency or institution to submit to the committee any additions or deletions to the list identifying any nondeveloped real property the agency has acquired or disposed of during the preceding state fiscal year. The committee is required to include this information in an annual report published on the website of the general assembly. The division of housing within the department of local affairs (division) is required to provide a link to the report on the division's website. The bill exempts the division of parks and wildlife in the department of natural resources from these requirements.

On a page on the website maintained by the department of local affairs that is dedicated to the division, section 3 requires the division to provide a link to the annual report that includes information on nondeveloped real property owned by or under the control of each state agency or institution of higher education. Not later than once annually by December 31 of each year, the division is required to update this link.

Under current law, certain property is exempt from the levy and collection of the real property tax if the property is owned by:

  • A nonprofit corporation the earnings of which do not inure to a private shareholder, the property is irrevocably dedicated to charitable, religious, or hospital purposes; or
  • A nonprofit corporation is a general partner of a partnership that was formed for the purpose of creating or maintaining affordable housing.

The statutory provisions that allow for the property tax exemption for a partnership satisfying the requirements of the exemption do not apply if, during a specified compliance period, the partnership which owns the residential structure distributes income or has income available for distribution to its partners or if the residential structure is sold or otherwise disposed of during the compliance period. If the property tax administrator (administrator) determines that income has been distributed or has been available for distribution or the residential property has been sold or otherwise disposed of, the administrator is required to revoke the property tax exemption for the residential property and to levy and collect property tax against the residential property, which would have otherwise been levied and collected from the date on which the exemption was initially granted plus all delinquent interest as provided for by law.

Under section 4 , for property tax years commencing on or after January 1, 2019, if the administrator determines that income has been distributed or has been available for distribution or the residential property has been sold or otherwise disposed of, the administrator is required to either revoke the property tax exemption for the residential property as of the date income becomes available for distribution or terminate the exemption as of the date the property is transferred. Under the bill, the administrator is no longer required in such circumstances to levy and collect property taxes that otherwise would have been levied and collected.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/17/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1320 Hospital Community Benefit Accountability 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: Friday, May 3 2019
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(1) in senate calendar.
Short Title: Hospital Community Benefit Accountability
Sponsors: C. Kennedy | S. Lontine / F. Winter
Summary:

The bill requires the following hospitals to complete an annual community health needs assessment and an annual community benefit implementation plan:

  • A hospital that is licensed as a general hospital and exempt from federal taxation pursuant to section 501 (c)(3) of the federal internal revenue code;
  • A hospital established pursuant to the Denver health and hospital authority; or
  • A hospital established pursuant to the University of Colorado hospital authority.

Each such hospital must report to the department of health care policy and financing (department) concerning certain community benefits, costs, and shortfalls in the preceding year, and the department is required to submit an annual summary report to subject matter committees of the general assembly. Hospitals that are licensed as general hospitals but that are not required to report may report in like fashion.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/16/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1327 Authorize And Tax Sports Betting Refer Under Taxpayers' Bill Of Rights 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: Friday, May 3 2019
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE (CONTINUED)
(1) in senate calendar.
Short Title: Authorize And Tax Sports Betting Refer Under Taxpayers' Bill Of Rights
Sponsors: A. Garnett | P. Neville / K. Donovan | J. Cooke
Summary:

In 2018, the United States supreme court held in Murphy v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, 138 S. Ct. 1461, that a federal law prohibiting states from authorizing sports betting violated the tenth amendment of the United States constitution. States may now authorize sports betting.

The bill decriminalizes sports betting in Colorado, effective May 1, 2020, under the following conditions:

  • The collection of a tax on the net proceeds of sports betting must be approved by the registered electors of Colorado at the November 2019 general election;
  • Sports betting will be regulated by the department of revenue, subject to supervision by the existing limited gaming control commission;
  • A limited number of licenses will be issued. Persons or entities currently licensed to conduct limited gaming (i.e., the owners of casinos in Central City, Black Hawk, and Cripple Creek) are the only persons or entities eligible to hold a "master license" to conduct sports betting upon paying a license fee and submitting to background checks. A master license entitles the licensee to contract with a licensed "sports betting operator" or a licensed "internet sports betting operator", or both, for the operation of sports betting.
  • The conduct of sports betting in Central City, Black Hawk, and Cripple Creek is further conditioned on approval by the voters of each city in a local election to be held concurrently with the statewide election in November 2019; and
  • The state will collect a tax of 10% on the net proceeds of sports betting activity to fund implementation of the state water plan and other public purposes. Of the total amount of tax collected, after first repaying the general fund appropriation for startup and initial operating costs, 6% is set aside annually to compensate the beneficiaries of revenues generated by limited gaming and other wagering activities for any losses attributable to competition from sports betting.

The bill appropriates $1,739,015 to the department of revenue for startup and initial operating costs in the 2019-20 state fiscal year.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/29/2019 Governor Signed

HB19-1333 Cigarette Tobacco & Nicotine Products Tax 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Cigarette Tobacco & Nicotine Products Tax
Sponsors: Y. Caraveo / R. Fields
Summary:

The bill refers a ballot issue to the voters at the November 2019 statewide election for the following tax increases:

  • To increase the cigarette tax by 8.75 cents per cigarette;
  • To increase the tobacco products tax by 22% of the manufacturer's list price; and
  • To create a tax on nicotine products that is equal to 62% of the manufacturer's list price, which is the same total tax as the tax levied on tobacco products with the increase.

If voters approve the tax, then the state will have the authority to impose these taxes and retain and spend the revenue as a voter-approved revenue change, and the remainder of the bill takes effect upon approval.

The new nicotine products tax is modeled after the tobacco products tax. Nicotine products are products that contain nicotine and that are ingested into the body, which at this time is typically through vaping with an electronic cigarette. The excise tax is levied on the sale, use, consumption, handling, or distribution of all nicotine products in the state, and it is imposed on a distributor at the time the product is brought into the state, made here, or shipped or transported to retailers in the state. If a distributor fails to pay the tax, then any person or entity in possession of the nicotine products is liable for the tax.

To be a distributor of nicotine products, a person must have a license. The license costs $10 per year and requires that the distributor must have a tax license and comply with all of the laws relating to the collection of the tax. Distributors are required to file quarterly returns, and the department of revenue (department) may require electronic fund transfers of the taxes paid. Licensees are required to maintain certain records, and retailers are likewise required to maintain records about nicotine products it purchases from a licensed distributor. The department may share the names and addresses of persons who purchased nicotine products for resale with the department of public health and environment and county and district public health agencies.

To account for the increased taxes per cigarette, the discount percentage on cigarette stamps that a cigarette wholesaler may retain for its collection costs is reduced from 4% to .4% and the similar discount for a tobacco products distributor is reduced from 3.33% to 1.6%. A nicotine products distributor will be permitted to retain 1.1% of the taxes collected.

In general, 50% of the revenue from the new nicotine products tax and the additional cigarette and tobacco products taxes (new tax revenue) is allocated for purposes related to health care, and 50% is allocated for preschool programs and expanded learning opportunities. Specifically, the new tax revenue is deposited in the old age pension fund and then credited to the general fund in accordance with the state constitution. The state treasurer is then required to transfer 50% of the new tax revenue from the general fund to the behavioral health and health care affordability and accessibility cash fund (behavioral health fund).

The state treasurer is further required to transfer money in the behavioral health fund as follows:

  • 19%, up to $30 million, to the tobacco education programs fund, which is primarily used for tobacco education, prevention, and cessation programs, which are expanded to include nicotine products; and
  • 9.5%, up to $15 million, to offset the decreased revenue from the existing taxes that may result from the voter-approved rate increases, and of this amount, 73% is further allocated to the tobacco tax cash fund and 27% to the general fund.

For fiscal years that begin prior to July 1, 2023, the general assembly is required to appropriate the remainder of the money in the behavioral health fund as follows:

  • 66% to make health care more affordable and accessible; and
  • 34% to improve the provision of behavioral health services for children and youth.

Thereafter, the specific allocation no longer applies and the only limitation on appropriating for these 2 purposes is that each purpose must receive at least 20% of the fund remainder.

The state treasurer is required to transfer the other 50% of the new tax revenue to the newly created preschool programs cash fund, from which money is appropriated to the department of education to improve the availability, affordability, and quality of voluntary early childhood education, and to the Colorado expanded learning opportunities cash fund, from which money is used for the Colorado expanded learning opportunities program. The allocation of the new tax revenue between the 2 funds is as follows:

  • For the 2019-20 and 2020-21 fiscal years, 35% to the preschool programs cash fund and 15% to the Colorado expanded learning opportunities cash fund;
  • For the 2021-22 fiscal year, 30% to the preschool programs cash fund and 20% to the Colorado expanded learning opportunities cash fund; and
  • For the 2022-23 fiscal year and each fiscal year thereafter, 27.5% to the preschool programs cash fund and 22.5% to the Colorado expanded learning opportunities cash fund.

The state auditor is required to annually conduct a financial audit of the use of the new tax revenue.

The bill also creates the Colorado expanded learning opportunities program, which is established to allow eligible students to participate in out-of-school learning experiences. The Colorado expanded learning opportunities agency, which is an independent agency in the department of education, through an administering nonprofit, pays providers for eligible students to participate in such experiences.


(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 5/2/2019 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Lost with Amendments - Committee

SB19-001 Expand Medication-assisted Treatment Pilot Program 
CU Lobbyist: Heather/Tanya
CU Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Expand Medication-assisted Treatment Pilot Program
Sponsors: L. Garcia / B. Buentello
Summary: In 2017, the general assembly enacted Senate Bill 17-074, which created a 2-year medication-assisted treatment (MAT) expansion pilot program, administered by the university of Colorado college of nursing, to expand access to medication-assisted treatment to opioid-dependent patients in Pueblo and Routt counties. The bill: Expands the pilot program to the counties in the San Luis valley and 2 additional counties in which a need is demonstrated; ! Shifts responsibility to administer the pilot program from the college of nursing to the center for research into substance use disorder prevention, treatment, and recovery support strategies; ! Adds representatives from the San Luis valley and any other counties selected to participate in the pilot program to the advisory board that assists in administering the program; ! Increases the annual appropriation for the pilot program to $5 million for the 2019-20 and 2020-21 fiscal years; and ! Extends the program an additional 2 years.
Status: 5/14/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-002 Regulate Student Education Loan Servicers 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Regulate Student Education Loan Servicers
Sponsors: F. Winter | S. Fenberg / D. Roberts | D. Jackson
Summary: The bill requires an entity that services a student education loan to be licensed by the administrator of the "Uniform Consumer Credit Code". "Servicing" means receiving a scheduled periodic payment from a student loan borrower, applying the payments of principal and interest with respect to the amounts received from a student loan borrower, and similar administrative services. The bill also creates a student loan ombudsperson to provide timely assistance to student loan borrowers.
Status: 5/13/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-003 Educator Loan Forgiveness Program 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Educator Loan Forgiveness Program
Sponsors: R. Zenzinger | D. Coram / B. McLachlan | J. Wilson
Summary: The bill makes changes to the teacher loan forgiveness program, renaming it the educator loan forgiveness program (program) and revising the eligibility criteria for the program. The program: ! Repays up to $5,000 of qualified educational loans for up to 5 years for teachers and other educators employed in qualified positions under the program; and ! Targets teachers and other educators employed in hard-to-fill positions due to geography or content area.
Status: 5/29/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-007 Prevent Sexual Misconduct At Higher Ed Campuses 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Prevent Sexual Misconduct At Higher Ed Campuses
Sponsors: B. Pettersen | F. Winter / B. McLachlan | J. Buckner
Summary: The bill requires each institution of higher education (institution) to adopt, periodically review, and update a policy on sexual misconduct (policy). The bill establishes minimum requirements for the policies, including reporting options, procedures for investigations and adjudications, and protections for involved persons. Institutions shall promote the policy by posting information on their websites and annually distributing the policy and information. Institutions are required to provide training on awareness and prevention of sexual misconduct, the policy, and resources available to discuss such misconduct. The bill requires institutions to report to the department of higher education (department) on their policies and training, and the department shall post the reports on its website. The department is to host biennial summits on sexual misconduct on institution campuses to facilitate communication, share information, and hear from experts. The bill identifies the membership of the planning committee for the summits. The planning committees are to report to specified committees of the general assembly on the summits.
Status: 5/31/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-009 Financial Incentives For Rural Educators 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Financial Incentives For Rural Educators
Sponsors: N. Todd / B. McLachlan | J. Wilson
Summary: Under existing law, the department of higher education (department) annually awards up to 40 stipends of not more than $2,800 to students enrolled in teacher preparation programs who agree to teach in a rural school or rural school district. The bill removes the limit on the number of stipends and increases the amount to $4,000. Under existing law, the department also annually awards up to 60 stipends to educators in rural schools and rural school districts who are seeking certain certifications. The bill removes the limit on the number of stipends.
Status: 3/25/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-057 Employee Information Student Loan Repayment Programs 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Employee Information Student Loan Repayment Programs
Sponsors: T. Story | S. Fenberg / J. McCluskie
Summary: The bill requires the department of personnel to develop and annually distribute informational materials to state employees concerning federal student loan repayment programs and loan forgiveness programs for which state employees may be eligible. The department of personnel may use existing federal informational materials, if available. The informational materials may be distributed by e-mail or through a regular mailing or communication to state employees. The department of personnel shall update the materials at least annually and distribute any updated materials.
Status: 3/15/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-067 Rural Development Grant Program Creation 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Rural Development Grant Program Creation
Sponsors: D. Coram / B. McLachlan | J. Arndt
Summary: The bill creates the rural development grant program to be administered by the Colorado office of economic development. The grants are to be awarded to early stage rural businesses that are primary employers in a rural area with the potential to export goods or services outside of the rural area. The businesses must be at the seed stage of capital financing, have raised less than five hundred thousand dollars of third-party capital, and are able to provide nonstate matching funding equal to at least one-third of the grant award. The grants may be used for developing prototypes, proof of business concepts, or proof of business models. The grants are funded from the general fund and are limited to no more than $150,000 per early stage rural business per year.
Status: 4/25/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments

SB19-079 Electronic Prescribing Controlled Substances 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Electronic Prescribing Controlled Substances
Sponsors: N. Todd | K. Priola / D. Esgar | L. Landgraf
Summary: Sections 1 to 14 of the bill require podiatrists, physicians, physician assistants, advanced practice nurses, and optometrists, starting July 1, 2021, and dentists and practitioners serving rural communities or in a solo practice, starting July 1, 2023, to prescribe schedule II, III, or IV controlled substances only via a prescription that is electronically transmitted to a pharmacy unless a specified exception applies. Prescribers are required to indicate on license renewal questionnaires whether they have complied with the electronic prescribing requirement. Section 15 specifies that pharmacists need not verify the applicability of an exception to electronic prescribing when they receive an order for a controlled substance in writing, orally, or via facsimile transmission and may fill the order if otherwise valid under the law.
Status: 4/8/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-085 Equal Pay For Equal Work Act 
CU Lobbyist: Tanya
CU Position: Pending
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Equal Pay For Equal Work Act
Sponsors: J. Danielson | B. Pettersen / J. Buckner | S. Gonzales-Gutierrez
Summary: The bill removes the authority of the director of the division of labor standards and statistics in the department of labor and employment (director) to enforce wage discrimination complaints based on an employee's sex and instead permits an aggrieved person to bring a civil action in district court to pursue remedies specified in the bill. The bill allows exceptions to the prohibition against a wage differential based on sex if the employer demonstrates that a wage differential is based upon one or more factors, including: A seniority system; A merit system; or A system that measures earnings by quantity or quality of production.
Status: 5/22/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-095 Five-year Review Of Higher Education Funding Formula 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Five-year Review Of Higher Education Funding Formula
Sponsors: N. Todd | C. Holbert / C. Hansen | H. McKean
Summary: The bill requires the Colorado commission on higher education (commission) to conduct a review of the funding formula for institutions of higher education every 5 years and to submit a report on recommended changes to specified committees of the general assembly on or before November 1 of the year in which the review was conducted. It also specifies certain steps that the commission shall take in conducting the review.
Status: 4/4/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-097 Area Technical College Grant Program 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Area Technical College Grant Program
Sponsors: T. Story | D. Coram / J. McCluskie | M. Soper
Summary: The bill establishes a grant program to provide money to area technical colleges (ATC) for specified capital construction and equipment purchases. An ATC may submit a request to the Colorado commission on higher education (commission). The commission may include the grant request in its budget request for ATCs in the following state fiscal year. If the ATC receives grant money, the ATC must submit a report back to the commission in any year in which it expends grant money.
Status: 4/16/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-099 Revised Uniform Athlete Agents Act 2015 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Revised Uniform Athlete Agents Act 2015
Sponsors: N. Todd / K. Tipper
Summary: Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. Athlete agents who represent students first became regulated in Colorado through the enactment of the "Uniform Athlete Agents Act" in 2008, which, among other requirements, required athlete agents to register with the department of regulatory agencies. The general assembly repealed the registration requirement in 2010. The bill enacts the "Revised Uniform Athlete Agents Act (2015)", drafted by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws. The revised act establishes new provisions for registration and renewal of registration for athlete agents, to be administered by the secretary of state. The revised act is subject to sunset review in 2026 and repeals in 2027 if not continued by bill.
Status: 5/31/2019 Governor Vetoed

SB19-110 Licensing Regulation Ambulatory Surgical Centers 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Licensing Regulation Ambulatory Surgical Centers
Sponsors: L. Crowder / R. Pelton
Summary: Under current law, certain freestanding and office-based facilities performing outpatient procedures such as liposuction and radiation treatments are not regulated to the same extent as facilities within a hospital and, in some cases, not at all. The bill extends the jurisdiction of the department of public health and environment to license these facilities and to adopt rules governing their operation.
Status: 2/11/2019 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely

SB19-133 Require License Practice Genetic Counseling 
CU Lobbyist: Jerry
CU Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Require License Practice Genetic Counseling
Sponsors: J. Ginal | N. Todd / D. Michaelson Jenet | J. Buckner
Summary:

The bill enacts the "Genetic Counselor Licensure Act". On and after June 1, 2020, a person cannot practice genetic counseling without being licensed by the director of the division of professions and occupations in the department of regulatory agencies. To be licensed, a person must have been certified by a national body, except that the director may issue a provisional license to a candidate for certification pursuant to requirements established by rule.

The bill gives title protection to genetic counselors and standard licensing, rule-making, and disciplinary powers to the director. Genetic counselors must have insurance. The bill repeals the act on September 1, 2026, subject to sunset review. Genetic counselors are subject to the mandatory disclosures of the "Michael Skolnik Medical Transparency Act of 2010".

The bill makes conforming amendments to harmonize the bill with the title 12 recodification bill, House Bill 19-1172.

The bill appropriates $33,622 to the department of regulatory agencies from the division of professions and occupations cash fund to implement the act.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/31/2019 Governor Vetoed

SB19-138 Bond Requirements For Public Projects Using Private Financing 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Bond Requirements For Public Projects Using Private Financing
Sponsors: F. Winter | K. Priola / S. Bird
Summary:

Under current law, when a person, company, firm, corporation, or contractor (contractor) enters into a contract with a county, municipality, school district, or, in some instances, any other political subdivision of the state to perform work in connection with a project that has specified characteristics, the contractor is required to execute performance bonds and payment bonds.

The bill specifies that some of these bonding requirements apply to certain construction contracts situated or located on publicly owned property using public or private money or public or private financing.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/16/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-153 Sunset Podiatry Board 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Sunset Podiatry Board
Sponsors: R. Fields / C. Kipp | B. Titone
Summary:

Sunset Process - Senate Health and Human Services Committee. The bill implements the recommendations of the department of regulatory agencies' sunset review and report on the regulatory functions of the Colorado podiatry board (board) as follows:

  • Continues the regulation of podiatrists for 7 years, until September 1, 2026 ( sections 1 and 2 of the bill);
  • Requires a podiatrist to notify the board of a physical illness, physical condition, or behavioral or mental health disorder that affects the podiatrist's ability to practice and allows the podiatrist and the board to enter into a confidential agreement to limit the podiatrist's practice based on the illness, condition, or disorder ( sections 4 and 6 );
  • Specifies that the passage of an examination approved by the board is required for initial licensure as a podiatrist ( section 3 ); and
  • Eliminates the requirement that the board send letters of admonition by certified mail ( section 5 ).

The bill also:

  • Allows the board to permit a podiatrist to perform bone marrow aspirations from the tibia distal to the tibial tubercle if the podiatrist meets the specified criteria ( section 7 ); and
  • Makes conforming amendments necessary to harmonize the bill with the title 12 recodification bill, House Bill 19-1172 ( sections 8 through 14 ).
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/30/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-170 Inquiry Into College Applicant Criminal History 
CU Lobbyist: Heather and Tanya
CU Position: Pending amendments
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Inquiry Into College Applicant Criminal History
Sponsors: R. Rodriguez | J. Tate / L. Herod | M. Soper
Summary:

The bill prohibits a state institution of higher education (institution) from inquiring about an applicant's criminal history, or disciplinary history at an elementary, secondary, or postsecondary institution (disciplinary history), prior to admission; except that the institution may inquire about any pending criminal charges against the applicant; an applicant's prior convictions or disciplinary history for stalking, sexual assault, and domestic violence; and an applicant's convictions within 5 years before submitting the application for assault, kidnapping, voluntary manslaughter, or murder.

An institution that accepts a form of application that may be used to apply to other institutions of higher education is prohibited from considering any criminal or disciplinary history information provided on that application that the institution is prohibited from inquiring into on its own application. An institution that accepts a form of application that is designed by a national application service, tailored for admission to a specific degree program, and used in other states may consider criminal history information provided on that application.

An institution's review of an otherwise qualified applicant's disclosed criminal history or disciplinary history must be made in a reasonable amount of time. An institution must provide an appeals process for an otherwise qualified applicant denied admission based on the applicant's criminal or disciplinary history.

An institution is required to post its policies regarding inquiries into an applicant's criminal and disciplinary history on its website and file such policies with the Colorado commission on higher education (commission). An institution must notify the commission at least 30 days before making any changes to such policies.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/28/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-171 Apprenticeships And Vocational Technical Training 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position: Neutral
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Apprenticeships And Vocational Technical Training
Sponsors: J. Danielson | J. Bridges / T. Sullivan | R. Galindo
Summary:

The bill requires the Colorado department of labor and employment (department) to create the Colorado state apprenticeship resource directory. The department is required to collect detailed information on each apprenticeship program in the state, including the application process, requirements for enrollment, costs, and program outcomes. The department is required to promote the availability of the directory.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/28/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-174 Dependent Tuition Assistance Program Eligibility 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Dependent Tuition Assistance Program Eligibility
Sponsors: L. Garcia | O. Hill / B. Buentello | P. Neville
Summary:

Under existing law, state tuition assistance is available for a dependent of a prisoner of war or military personnel missing in action, a dependent of a person who died or was permanently disabled while on duty as a Colorado National Guardsman, and a dependent of any person who has been permanently disabled or killed while acting as a police officer, sheriff, or other law enforcement officer or firefighter (dependents) who are not eligible for federal educational benefits.

The bill clarifies that a dependent who is eligible for state tuition assistance and federal educational benefits pursuant to the federal "Public Safety Officers' Benefits Act" may receive the state tuition assistance prior to receiving the federal benefit. The state tuition assistance available to a dependent is reduced by the amount of any federal educational benefit provided to the dependent.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/14/2019 Signed by Governor

SB19-176 Expanding Concurrent Enrollment Opportunities 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position: Neutral with amendment s
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Expanding Concurrent Enrollment Opportunities
Sponsors: P. Lundeen | J. Bridges / J. McCluskie | T. Geitner
Summary:

The bill clarifies the differences between concurrent enrollment, dual enrollment programs, and other programs that enable a student to earn postsecondary credits while the student is enrolled in high school. Beginning in the 2020-21 school year, each school district, charter school, and public school operated by a board of cooperative services (local education provider) that enrolls students in grades 9 through 12 is required to provide the opportunity for concurrent enrollment. A local education provider cannot unreasonably deny approval for concurrent enrollment or limit the number of postsecondary courses in which a qualified student may enroll unless the local education provider is unable to provide access due to technological capacity. A local education provider may determine the manner in which it provides opportunities for concurrent enrollment.

The bill clarifies the information that a local education provider must provide to qualified students and their parents concerning concurrent enrollment, dual enrollment programs, the transferability of postsecondary course credits, and the costs that a qualified student or the student's parent may incur by enrolling in a postsecondary course through concurrent enrollment or a dual enrollment program. The bill clarifies that a qualified student and the student's parent are not required to pay tuition for concurrent enrollment or for enrolling in a postsecondary course through a pathways in technology early college high school, commonly known as a p-tech school.

The bill requires the department of education and the department of higher education to create a concurrent enrollment website to provide information to the public concerning the various types of programs available to enable students to earn postsecondary credits while enrolled in high school.

The bill creates the concurrent enrollment expansion and innovation grant program to provide grants to local education providers to use in starting to offer concurrent enrollment or expanding the availability of concurrent enrollment. The department of education must administer the grant program, including providing an annual report that explains how the grant money is used, who is enrolling in concurrent enrollment and the types of courses they are enrolling in, and the number and transferability of postsecondary credits earned through concurrent enrollment. The department must submit the report to the state board of education, the department of higher education, the Colorado commission on higher education, and the education committees of the general assembly. The department must also post the report to the concurrent enrollment website.

The bill directs the state board for community colleges and occupational education to provide management and coordination of efforts to implement efforts to maximize participation in concurrent enrollment through the community college system.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/20/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-188 FAMLI Family Medical Leave Insurance Program 
CU Lobbyist: Tanya
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: FAMLI Family Medical Leave Insurance Program
Sponsors: F. Winter | A. Williams / M. Gray | M. Duran
Summary:

The bill creates a study of the implementation of a paid family and medical leave program in the state by:

  • Requiring the department of labor and employment (department) to contract with experts in the field of paid family and medical leave;
  • Requiring the department to make requests for information from third parties that may be willing to administer all or part of a paid family and medical leave program;
  • Creating the family and medical leave implementation task force (task force) that is responsible for recommending a plan to implement a paid family and medical leave program for the state; and
  • Requiring an actuarial study of the final plan recommended by the task force.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/30/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-190 Teacher Preparation Program Support 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position: Oppose
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Teacher Preparation Program Support
Sponsors: N. Todd | B. Rankin / B. McLachlan | J. Wilson
Summary:

The bill directs the department of higher education and the department of education (departments) to work with the deans of the schools of education to review research and identify best practices in teacher preparation. By January 1, 2020, the departments must jointly adopt guidelines to assist educator preparation programs in adopting and implementing the best practices. The departments must also jointly prepare a report concerning the best practices, the guidelines, and regulatory and statutory recommendations to ensure that the policies and criteria for approving educator preparation programs align with the best practices. The departments must submit the report to the Colorado commission on higher education, the state board of education, and the education committees of the general assembly. By March 1, 2020, the educator preparation programs must each submit a report to the departments demonstrating how the program will implement the best practices over the following 3 years.

The bill creates the teacher mentor grant program in the department of higher education to provide money to school districts, boards of cooperative services, and charter schools (local education providers) that partner with educator preparation programs to provide training and stipends for teachers who serve as mentors for teacher candidates participating in clinical practice. The bill specifies requirements that a partnership's teacher mentor program must meet to receive a grant, including paying the mentor teacher a stipend. The bill directs the departments to work with interested parties to identify best practice standards and guidelines for teacher mentoring, and requires the department of higher education to adopt the standards and guidelines by January 1, 2020.

Beginning in the 2020-21 budget year, the department of higher education must annually prepare a report concerning implementation of the teacher mentor grant program and submit the report to the Colorado commission on higher education, the state board of education, the department of education, and the education committees of the general assembly.

The bill relocates with nonsubstantive changes the existing collaborative educator preparation grant program and the "Rural Colorado Grow Your Own Educator Act", which provides grants for teaching fellowship programs.

The bill directs the department of education to collaborate with the department of higher education to create a mentor teacher endorsement for teachers who hold master certificates and provide mentoring and oversight for teacher candidates. The bill allows a teacher to use service as a mentor teacher as an approved professional development activity for license renewal.

Currently, the statute specifies the requirements that an educator preparation program must meet to be approved. The bill adds 2 requirements: An educator preparation program must include instruction in the science of reading and must include at least one full-continuous school year of clinical practice.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-194 National Guard Tuition Assistance Colorado State University Global 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: National Guard Tuition Assistance Colorado State University Global
Sponsors: L. Garcia | R. Zenzinger / M. Froelich | K. Van Winkle
Summary:

The bill adds Colorado state university - global campus to the list of designated institutions of higher education for purposes of tuition assistance for members of the National Guard.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/21/2019 Signed by Governor

SB19-196 Colorado Quality Apprenticeship Training Act Of 2019 
CU Lobbyist: Heather
CU Position: Oppose
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Colorado Quality Apprenticeship Training Act Of 2019
Sponsors: P. Lee | J. Danielson / A. Garnett | M. Duran
Summary: If enacted it is estimated that this legislation will increase state supported project costs by roughly 7% for projects of at least $1 million. At CU that equates to nearly $4 million for all campuses based on current state funded projects—capital construction and controlled maintenance—including .5 FTE ($30,000) for a project coordinator. This amount will fluctuate depending on the number of state supported projects. Dave Kang from CU Boulder: • General comment: There is concern over adding additional steps to our project procurement process which could limit the number of interested bidders on certain contract deliver methods, specifically, design/bid/build. While we have had success with this deliver method in the past there is always a challenge in attracting interested bidders. This proposal could create additional burden causing some contractors to lose interest in a design/bid/build delivery method, forcing us to use other delivery methods that might bring less value depending on the project circumstances. • Requirement for competitive sealed best value bids: We are supportive of the “best value” concept but why limit ourselves to only this method? For non-complex projects, it may make sense to use “low bid, technically qualified” or other method without going through a formal “best value” determination. I think that we should maintain the current language that says that projects over $1M “may” use this process and not “shall” use this process. I like having flexibility. Also, the legislation does not provide guidance on how to evaluate the labor staffing requirement being proposed. • Disclosure of subcontractors: Depending on the timing of the bidding process, requiring a prime contractor to lock in their subcontractors at the time of RFP response could negatively impact the pricing proposals. Forcing identification early could inflate those subcontractor costs. • Apprenticeship utilization requirements: Ensuring that subcontractors are participating in an apprenticeship program may limit the pool of subcontractors available to participate in public projects, limiting competition to the larger subcontractors and potentially inflating project costs. Many of our contractors already have training programs in place so not sure this adds value to the state and/or what is the demonstrated need this would be addressing. • Integrated project delivery: Limitations regarding the use of domestically produced iron, steel and other materials could have negative cost implications. Kent Marsh from CU Colorado Springs 1. Added costs are well documented in the work completed by RLB and numerous other articles I found regarding the pros and cons of PLA’s. Added costs will make it more difficult to get funding for projects as the cost to build and renovate is growing by leaps and bounds already. 2. The majority of contractors in the mechanical, electrical and plumbing trades in Colorado Springs are signatory to local agreements already. Thus, the added costs for around 40% of total cost for a commercial building construction project in our area, are already part of the unit price UCCS (mechanical, electrical and plumbing account for 40% of the total cost) . 3. I wasn’t aware of this until speaking to JE Dunn this morning, but they are one of the fee G.C.’s that are signatory to local agreements. They claim hiring skilled tradesman from local trade unions provide a better end product and help keep costs down on their end. They argue the industry is already paying higher prices and ought to get the benefit of the training that’s provided by local trade unions. 4. Having fixed pricing agreements in place would prevent much of the price escalation we see in each and every change order we get from a sub-contractor during a construction project. Yes, it’s true the G.C. isn’t able to mark up their costs, but nothing prevents sub-contractors from adding another 20%-30% to the cost of a change order. 5. My biggest concern is the added paper work, “I” dotting and “t” crossing, and additional administrative costs that comes with this type of change. CU Denver/Anschutz Adding to Dave’s input union labor is less than 10% of Colorado’s workforce and this bill’s apprenticeship does lean the union direction and could severely limit the bidding pool. It creates a lot of administrative work for the State and Higher Ed agencies and I know you(Kristen/Cheri) like to understand the fiscal impact and I could see adding .5 FTE position to track compliance at an Admin 3 level or Project coordinator level roughly $30K/year for the .5 FTE. Larry Friedberg had added the AGCs position which anticipates a 7% increase in construction cost for the bill and CU Denver I Anschutz annual volume of construction is $50M so it adds a minimum of $3.5M.(see attached) The majority of our over $1M projects are completed using the CMGC contracting method and subcontractors are not engaged until you reach 65% to 100% stage of design and this bill would require to bringing them at the initial procurement on with very limited information about the scope of work and would restrict competition.
Status: 5/28/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-199 READ Act Implementation Measures 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: READ Act Implementation Measures
Sponsors: N. Todd | B. Rankin / J. McCluskie | J. Wilson
Summary:

The bill makes several changes concerning implementation of the "Colorado Reading to Ensure Academic Development Act" (READ act) by school districts, charter schools, and boards of cooperative services that operate schools (local education providers) as follows:

  • Requiring that instructional programming and services for teaching reading be focused on the areas of phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary development, reading fluency including oral skills, and reading comprehension (foundational reading skills);
  • Directing each local education provider to include in its performance plan specified information concerning the reading assessments, curriculum, instructional programs, and intervention instruction and services used and, for certain local education providers, the plan for providing professional development for teachers;
  • Specifying that students with significant reading deficiencies (SRD) and students who read below grade level must receive educational services in a daily literacy block for the length of time indicated by research;
  • Requiring each local education provider that receives money through the READ act to provide evidence-based training in teaching reading to kindergarten and first-through-third grade teachers;
  • Encouraging local education providers to partner with adjacent public libraries to enhance instruction in literacy.

The bill directs the department to develop and implement a public information campaign to emphasize the importance of learning to read by third grade and to highlight the local education providers that achieve high percentages of third-grade students who are reading at grade level. The bill directs the department to contract with an independent evaluator to evaluate the implementation of the READ act in the state and evaluate whether a local education provider's use of per-pupil intervention money or early literacy grant program money results in students making progress toward reading competency .

The bill changes the distribution of money appropriated from the early literacy fund for the 2019-20 budget year by reducing the amount distributed as per-pupil intervention money, increasing the amount distributed through the early literacy grant fund, and adding distributions to pay for the public information campaign, the independent evaluator, and teacher training. For the 2020-21 budget year and budget years thereafter, the bill specifies the purposes for which the money in the early literacy fund may be appropriated in amounts specified in the annual general appropriations bill.

The bill changes the procedure for distributing the per-pupil intervention money by:

  • Requiring a local education provider to provide information and meet certain requirements in order to receive the money;
  • Authorizing the department to monitor and, if necessary, audit the use of the money throughout the budget year;
  • Expanding the allowable uses of the per-pupil intervention money to include purchasing core reading instructional programs and purchasing technology, including software, to assist in assessing and monitoring student progress; and
  • Capping the amount of per-pupil intervention money that a local education provider may retain from year to year.

The bill amends the early literacy grant program to allow a school district to apply for a district-level grant or a school-level grant and to prohibit the state board of education (state board) from restricting an applicant's use of any of the approved reading assessments. The bill also provides that, if the department, at the completion of a grant, determines that the program implemented with the grant money was successful in moving students toward reading competency, the state board must automatically renew the grant and increase the grant amount if necessary to enable the grant recipient to expand the program.

The bill requires a local education provider to report the scores attained by students on the interim reading assessments if the local education provider uses per-pupil intervention money to purchase instructional programming in reading.

The bill expands reporting requirements to include information regarding student academic growth to standard in reading. Each local education provider must submit, in accordance with privacy laws, information requested to complete the independent evaluation of the implementation of the READ act, and the department, the independent evaluator, and the local education provider must collaborate to minimize the impact on instructional time caused by increased reporting.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/10/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-228 Substance Use Disorders Prevention Measures 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Substance Use Disorders Prevention Measures
Sponsors: F. Winter | D. Moreno / B. Buentello | J. Singer
Summary:

The bill:

  • Requires certain health care providers who have prescriptive authority to complete substance use disorder training as part of continuing education required to renew the provider's license. Specifically, the requirement applies to podiatrists, dentists, advanced practice nurses, optometrists, and veterinarians ( section 12).
  • Prohibits a physician or physician assistant from accepting any direct or indirect benefits for prescribing a specific medication ( section 2 );
  • Requires the state board of pharmacy to promulgate rules that require a prescription for an opioid for outpatient use, except for an opioid prescribed for treatment of a substance use disorder or that is a partial opioid antagonist, to bear a warning label ( section 3 );
  • Allows medical examiners and coroners access to the prescription drug monitoring program under specified circumstances ( section 4 );
  • For the 2019-20 fiscal year, appropriates $2 million to the department of public health and environment for the purpose of working at state and local levels to address opioid and other substance use disorder priorities ( section 6 );
  • Requires specified state departments to report to the health committees of the general assembly by December 31, 2019, the amount of federal funds that each is receiving or is eligible to receive for use in testing for hepatitis and HIV and the number of individuals currently and anticipated to be tested. The departments are also required to share eligibility standards for treatment with primary care providers ( section 7 ).
  • Creates a grant program in the office of behavioral health in the department of human services to address opioid and other substance use disorder prevention and recovery. The grant focuses on at-risk youth and their families affected by substance use disorders and who have not been successful in seeking aid through existing resources. The general assembly is required to appropriate $2 million from the marijuana tax cash fund to the department of human services ( section 8 ).
  • Requires the center for research into substance use disorder prevention, treatment, and recovery support strategies (center) to develop and implement a program to increase public awareness about the safe use, storage, and disposal of opioids, and about the availability of antagonist drugs. The general assembly is required to annually appropriate $750,000 to the center from the marijuana tax cash fund to implement the program ( section 9 ).
  • Requires the center to hire additional staff to assist local communities in applying for grants, and requires the general assembly to appropriate general funds for the 2019-20 fiscal year to enable the center to hire staff for this purpose ( section 9 );
  • Requires the office of behavioral health in the department of human services to administer a pilot program to integrate substance use disorder and medication-assisted treatment with obstetric and gynecological health care and requires the general assembly to appropriate money from the general fund in the 2019-20, 2020-21, and 2021-22 fiscal years to fund the pilot program ( section 11 ).

Sections 12 through 15 make conforming amendments to harmonize the bill with the title 12 recodification bill, House Bill 19-1172.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/23/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-231 Colorado Second Chance Scholarship 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Colorado Second Chance Scholarship
Sponsors: D. Moreno | J. Bridges / T. Exum | K. Tipper
Summary:

The bill creates the Colorado second chance scholarship (scholarship) in the department of higher education for youth previously committed to the division of youth services in the department of human services.

The bill requires the executive director of the commission on higher education to appoint a program coordinator to counsel and support scholarship recipients.

The bill creates an advisory board to establish the scholarship criteria and select scholarship recipients.


(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 5/28/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-233 Holding Company Income Tax Combined Report 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Holding Company Income Tax Combined Report
Sponsors: P. Lee / M. Snyder | M. Gray
Summary:

Two or more corporations controlled by the same interests are required to file a combined report in certain instances for apportioning income for Colorado income tax purposes. The Colorado court of appeals recently interpreted existing law to exclude all holding companies purportedly without property or payroll from combined reports. The bill clarifies that only corporations with property and payroll located outside the United States are excluded from a combined report. The bill further clarifies when the treatment of the activities of a partnership is treated as the activity of a member of an affiliated group of corporations.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/31/2019 Governor Signed

SB19-234 Sunset Professional Review Committees 
CU Lobbyist:
CU Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Short Title: Sunset Professional Review Committees
Sponsors: R. Rodriguez | M. Foote / M. Weissman
Summary:

Sunset Process - Senate Judiciary Committee. The bill implements the recommendations of the department of regulatory agencies' sunset review and report on the functions of professional review committees as follows:

  • Continues the functions of professional review committees for 11 years, until September 1, 2030 ( sections 1 and 2 of the bill);
  • Makes technical amendments repealing references to the committee on anticompetitive conduct since it no longer exists and changing the term "utilization and quality control peer review organization" to "quality improvement organization" to be consistent with federal law ( sections 3 and 4 );
  • Clarifies that governing boards reporting data, and the data reported, to the division of professions and occupations in the department of regulatory agencies (division) or a regulatory board may be known to staff of the division ( section 5 );
  • Requires governing boards to annually update their information with the division ( section 5 ); and
  • Requires the division to promulgate rules to determine the information a governing board is required to report and to establish a process to remove governing boards from the registry ( section 5 ).

The bill also:

  • Defines "original source document", exempts such documents from the definition of "records", and specifies when such documents may be subject to subpoena, discovery, or use in a civil action (sections 3 and 4);
  • Encourages each professional review committee of a hospital to appoint a consumer to service on the committee (section 4);
  • Repeals language requiring, in certain situations, a professional review committee for individuals licensed under the "Colorado Medical Practice Act" or the "Nurse Practice Act" medical board or nursing board (section 4); and
  • Makes conforming amendments necessary to harmonize the bill with the title 12 recodification bill, House Bill 19-1172 ( sections 6 through 9 ).
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/16/2019 Governor Signed