HB19-1037 Colorado Energy Impact Assistance Act 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: C. Hansen | D. Esgar / K. Donovan
Summary:

The bill, known as the "Colorado Energy Impact Assistance Act", authorizes any electric utility (utility) to apply to the public utilities commission (PUC) for a financing order that will authorize the utility to issue low-cost Colorado energy impact assistance bonds (bonds) to lower the cost to electric utility customers (ratepayers) when the retirement of an electric generating facility occurs. A utility that issues bonds in conjunction with the retirement of an electric generating facility may apply to the PUC for approval to replace the retired electric generating facility with cost-effective generation resources or energy storage facilities, the granting of which by the PUC is subject to specified requirements and limitations.

A portion of bond proceeds will provide transition assistance for Colorado workers and communities directly affected by the retirement of the facilities (transition assistance). To repay the bonds at the lowest cost to ratepayers, the PUC is authorized to review and approve a financing order and authorize a special energy impact assistance charge that is separate and apart from the utility's base rates on all ratepayer bills. The establishment and ongoing adjustment of the separate charge will allow bonds to achieve the highest possible credit rating, at least AA/Aa2, from the national independent credit rating agencies and will therefore allow bonds to be issued at the lowest possible interest rate and lowest subsequent cost to ratepayers.

Before issuing a financing order, the PUC must hold a public hearing, receive testimony from affected groups, and make specified determinations concerning the necessity, prudence, justness, reasonableness, and quantifiable benefits to utility ratepayers of issuing the financing order. After the public hearing process, if a financing order is approved by the PUC, it must include specific information and instructions for the utility to which it applies relating to the amount of bonds to be issued and the imposition of the energy impact assistance charge and must require the utility to pay 15% of the net present value of the savings to a newly created Colorado energy impact assistance authority (authority) for the payment of transition assistance by the authority and the authority's reasonable and necessary administrative and operating costs. As an alternative to the financing order and bond issuance process, upon the closure of an electric generating facility, a Colorado electric utility may transfer to the authority an amount of up to 15% of the net present value of operational savings created by the closure of the electric generating facility, and such a transfer shall be deemed by the PUC to be a prudent action by the utility.

The bill specifies that the authority is governed by a 7-member board of directors appointed by the governor and specifies mandatory and suggested occupational experience for the directors. The authority is authorized to receive bond proceeds from a utility to which a financing order applies and use the bond proceeds to provide transition assistance and pay its reasonable and necessary administrative and operating costs.

Transition assistance is defined to include payment of retraining costs, including costs of apprenticeship programs and skilled worker retraining programs, for and financial assistance to directly displaced Colorado facility workers, compensation to Colorado local governments for lost property tax revenue directly resulting from the retirement of a facility, and similar payments, job retraining, assistance, and compensation for directly displaced Colorado workers and local governments in areas that produce fuel used in the retired facility directly resulting from the elimination of the need for fuel at the facility. The authority must disburse at least 50% of the transition assistance that it provides directly to Colorado workers; except that, if the local advisory committee established by the authority as required by the bill determines that the disbursement of 50% of all transition assistance directly to Colorado workers would be excessive based on the amount of transition assistance available and the amount of need for such direct assistance and recommends that a lower percentage of all transition assistance be disbursed directly to Colorado workers, the authority may reduce the percentage of all transition assistance disbursed directly to Colorado workers below50% to any percentage not less than 30%. When determining how best to provide transition assistance to a local community, the authority must, in conjunction with each board of county commissioners, municipal governing body, and school district that includes all or a portion of the impacted community, establish and take into consideration the advice of a local advisory committee. The authority is subject to open meeting and open records requirements and is required to submit a report to specified committees of the general assembly that sets forth a complete and detailed financial and operating statement of the authority for any fiscal year for which the authority has provided transition assistance.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 1/4/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment
2/11/2019 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/14/2019 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/25/2019 House Second Reading Laid Over to 02/27/2019 - No Amendments
2/26/2019 House Second Reading Laid Over to 02/28/2019 - No Amendments
2/28/2019 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
3/1/2019 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/4/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/7/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Agriculture & Natural Resources
4/18/2019 Senate Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources Refer Amended to Transportation & Energy
4/25/2019 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Postpone Indefinitely
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1086 Plumbing Inspections Ensure Compliance 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: M. Duran / B. Pettersen
Summary:

Current law allows the state plumbing board to require licensees to demonstrate competency before reinstatement of an expired license. Section 1 of the bill expands the competency requirement to registrants.

To reinstate a license or registration that has been expired for 2 or more years, a person must demonstrate competency by:

  • Providing verification of a license in good standing from another state and proof of active practice in that state for the year previous to the date of receipt of the reinstatement application;
  • Satisfactorily passing the state plumbing examination; or
  • Any other means approved by the board.

To reinstate a license or registration that has been expired for less than two years (other than the first renewal or reinstatement of a license for which, as a condition of issuance, the applicant successfully completed a licensing examination), a person must have completed 8 hours of continuing education for every 12 months that have passed after the later of the last date of renewal or reinstatement.

The board is required to adopt rules establishing continuing education requirements and standards.

Section 2 requires state plumbing inspectors or plumbing inspectors employed by the state, an incorporated town or city, county, city and county, or qualified state institution of higher education (entity) to conduct a contemporaneous review of each plumbing project inspected to ensure compliance with the plumbing law, including specifically licensure and apprentice requirements. However, each entity need not perform a contemporaneous review for each inspection of a project. Each entity shall develop standard procedures to advise inspectors on how to conduct a contemporaneous review. Each entity must post its standard procedures on its public website and provide the director of the division of professions and occupations within the department of regulatory agencies with a link to the web page on which the standard procedures have been posted or, if the entity does not have a website, provide its current procedures to the director for posting on the board's website.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 1/14/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs and Labor
1/14/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
3/6/2019 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/8/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/11/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/13/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology
3/20/2019 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/25/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/28/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
3/29/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/1/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
4/5/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/8/2019 Sent to the Governor
4/8/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/16/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1096 Colorado Right To Rest 
Position: Oppose
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: J. Melton
Summary:

The bill creates the "Colorado Right to Rest Act", which establishes basic rights for people experiencing homelessness, including but not limited to the right to rest in public spaces, to shelter themselves from the elements, to eat or accept food in any public space where food is not prohibited, to occupy a legally parked vehicle, and to have a reasonable expectation of privacy of their property.

The bill prohibits discrimination based on housing status.

The bill creates an exemption of the basic right to rest for people experiencing homelessness for any county, city, municipality, or subdivision that can demonstrate that, for 3 consecutive months, the waiting lists for all local public housing authorities contain fewer than 50 people.

The bill allows the general assembly to appropriate money from the marijuana tax cash fund to the department of local affairs for the purpose of enabling governmental entities that do not meet the exemption requirement to reduce the housing waiting lists to fewer than 50 people for at least 6 months per year.

The bill allows any person whose rights have been violated to seek enforcement in a civil action.


(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 1/14/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation & Local Government
2/26/2019 House Committee on Transportation & Local Government Postpone Indefinitely
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments:

HB19-1118 Time Period To Cure Lease Violation 
Position: Monitor w/ Amendment
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: D. Jackson | R. Galindo / A. Williams
Summary:

Current law requires a landlord to provide a tenant 3 days to cure a violation for unpaid rent or any other condition or covenant of a lease agreement, other than a substantial violation, before the landlord can initiate eviction proceedings based on that unpaid rent or other violation. Current law also requires 3 days' notice prior to a tenancy being terminated for a subsequent violation of a condition or covenant of a lease agreement.

The bill requires a landlord, except for a landlord pursuant to a nonresidential agreement or an employer-provided housing agreement, to provide a tenant 10 days to cure a violation for unpaid rent or for a first violation of any other condition or covenant of a lease agreement, other than a substantial violation, before the landlord can initiate eviction proceedings. The bill requires 10 days' notice prior to the landlord terminating a lease agreement for a subsequent violation of the same condition or covenant of the agreement. For a nonresidential agreement or an employer-provided housing agreement, three days' notice is required to cure a violation for unpaid rent or for a first violation of any other condition or covenant of a lease agreement, or to terminate a lease for a subsequent violation of the same condition or covenant.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 1/16/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to
1/16/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
2/13/2019 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Refer Unamended to Transportation & Local Government
2/27/2019 House Committee on Transportation & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/5/2019 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/11/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/12/2019 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/15/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/19/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology
4/8/2019 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/11/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/15/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
4/16/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/17/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/18/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/22/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/1/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/2/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/2/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/20/2019 Governor Signed
5/21/2019 Signed by Governor
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1170 Residential Tenants Health And Safety Act 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: D. Jackson | M. Weissman / A. Williams | J. Bridges
Summary:

Under current law, a warranty of habitability (warranty) is implied in every rental agreement for a residential premises, and a landlord commits a breach of the warranty (breach) if:

  • The residential premises is uninhabitable or otherwise unfit for human habitation;
  • The residential premises is in a condition that is materially dangerous or hazardous to the tenant's life, health, or safety; and
  • The landlord has received written notice of the condition and failed to cure the problem within a reasonable time.

The bill states that a landlord breaches the warranty if a residential premises is:

  • Uninhabitable or otherwise unfit for human habitation or in a condition that is materially dangerous or hazardous to the tenant's life, health, or safety; and
  • The landlord has received reasonably complete written or electronic notice of the condition and failed to commence remedial action by employing reasonable efforts within:
  • 24 hours, where the condition is materially dangerous or hazardous to the tenant's life, health, or safety; or
  • 72 hours, where the premises is uninhabitable or otherwise unfit for human habitation.

Current law provides a list of conditions that render a residential premises uninhabitable. To this list, the bill adds 2 conditions; specifically, a residential premises is uninhabitable if:

  • The premises lacks functioning appliances that conformed to applicable law at the time of installation and that are maintained in good working order; or
  • There is mold that is associated with dampness, or there is any other condition causing the premises to be damp, which condition, if not remedied, would materially interfere with the health or safety of the tenant.

The bill grants to county courts jurisdiction to provide injunctive relief related to a breach.

Current law requires a tenant to serve written notice upon a landlord before the landlord may be held liable for a breach. The bill expands the acceptable form of such notice to include electronic notice.

The bill also:

  • States that if a tenant gives a landlord notice of a condition that is imminently hazardous to life, health, or safety the landlord, at the request of the tenant, shall move the tenant to a comparable dwelling unit, as selected by the landlord, at no expense or cost to the tenant, or to a hotel room, as selected by the landlord, at no expense or cost to the tenant.
  • Allows a tenant who satisfies certain conditions to deduct from one or more rent payments the cost to repair or remedy a condition causing a breach;
  • Repeals the requirement that a tenant notify a local government before seeking an injunction for a breach;
  • Repeals provisions that allow a rental agreement to require a tenant to assume certain responsibilities concerning conditions and characteristics of a premises;
  • Creates an exception for single-family residence premises for which a landlord does not receive a subsidy from any governmental source, by which exception a landlord and tenant may agree in writing that the tenant is to perform specific repairs, maintenance tasks, alterations, and remodeling, subject to certain requirements:
  • Prohibits a landlord from retaliating against a tenant in response to the tenant having made a good-faith complaint to the landlord or to a governmental agency alleging a condition that renders the premises uninhabitable or any condition that materially interferes with the health or safety of the tenant; and
  • Repeals certain presumptions and specifies monetary damages that may be available to a tenant against whom a landlord retaliates.

The bill states that if the same condition that substantially caused a breach recurs within 6 months after the condition is repaired or remedied, other than a condition that merely involves a nonfunctioning appliance, the tenant may terminate the rental agreement 14 days after providing the landlord written or electronic notice of the tenant's intent to do so. In the case of a condition that merely involves a nonfunctioning appliance, if the landlord remedies the condition within 14 days after receiving the notice, the tenant may not terminate the rental agreement.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 2/5/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public Health Care & Human Services
2/15/2019 House Committee on Public Health Care & Human Services Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/20/2019 House Second Reading Laid Over to 02/22/2019 - No Amendments
2/22/2019 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/25/2019 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
2/26/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/27/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government
3/14/2019 Senate Committee on Local Government Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/19/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/22/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
3/25/2019 Senate Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/26/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/28/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Not Concur - Request Conference Committee
3/28/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/12/2019 First Conference Committee Result was to Adopt Rerevised w/ Amendments
4/15/2019 Senate Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Adopt Committee Report - Repass
4/16/2019 House Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Adopt Committee Report - Repass
5/10/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/10/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/10/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/20/2019 Governor Signed
5/21/2019 Signed by Governor
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1175 Property Tax Valuation Appeal Process 
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: M. Gray / J. Gonzales
Summary:

For counties that have elected to use the alternate protest and appeal procedures, section 1 of the bill requires:

  • A taxpayer who owns rent-producing commercial real property to provide the assessor with property rental information (rental information) on or before July 15 of the year of the appeal; and
  • The county assessor to mail the notice of determination regarding the appeal by August 15 of the year of the appeal instead of the last working day in August.

For all counties, section 2 modifies:

  • The rental information that a petitioner appealing the valuation of rent-producing commercial property or the denial of an abatement must provide to a county; and
  • The information related to a county's determination of the value that a county is required to provide to a petitioner who has filed an appeal with the board of assessment appeals.

A petitioner who provides rental information to an assessor as part of an alternate protest and appeal is not required to provide the same information in an appeal of the valuation.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 2/7/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation & Local Government
2/13/2019 House Committee on Transportation & Local Government Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
2/15/2019 House Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/19/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/20/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government
2/26/2019 Senate Committee on Local Government Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/1/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/4/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/8/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
3/11/2019 Sent to the Governor
3/11/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
3/21/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments:

HB19-1183 Automated External Defibrillators In Public Places 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: D. Roberts / J. Bridges
Summary:

The bill defines a public place and encourages any person that owns, operates, or manages a public place to place functional automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in sufficient quantities to ensure reasonable availability for use during perceived sudden cardiac arrest emergencies.

The bill requires any public place to accept any gift, grant, or donation of an AED that meets federal standards. If a public place accepts a donated AED but the public place does not want to accept responsibility for AED training, installation, or maintenance, the public place is not required to accept the AED unless the donating party agrees to be responsible for AED training, installation, and maintenance. If the donating party accepts responsibility but can no longer provide maintenance, the public place may remove the AED from the public place.

The department shall award a $15,000 contract to a nonprofit organization for the purpose of acquiring and distributing AEDs to public places.

The bill repeals an obsolete provision that encouraged school districts to acquire an AED and moves that provision to article 51 of title 25.

The bill makes an appropriation.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 2/14/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Insurance
3/6/2019 House Committee on Health & Insurance Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/27/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/28/2019 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/29/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/3/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/10/2019 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/19/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/23/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/24/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/29/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/13/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/13/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/13/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/22/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1198 Electric Vehicle Grant Fund 
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: A. Valdez | D. Valdez / J. Bridges | K. Priola
Summary:

The bill modifies the statute governing the electric vehicle grant fund (fund) as follows:

  • Allows the fund to be used to administer grants for the installation of charging stations for electric vehicles;
  • Allows the fund to prioritize the grants it will provide based on criteria defined by the Colorado energy office;
  • Allows the fund to be used to fully fund the installation of charging stations and offset station operating costs; and
  • Requires the money in the fund to be continuously appropriated to the Colorado energy office.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 2/20/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment + Appropriations
3/4/2019 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
3/7/2019 House Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/8/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/11/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
3/26/2019 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/29/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/1/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/9/2019 Sent to the Governor
4/9/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/9/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/17/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments:

HB19-1257 Voter Approval To Retain Revenue For Ed & Transp 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: K. Becker | J. McCluskie / L. Court | K. Priola
Summary:

Beginning with the 2019-20 fiscal year, the bill authorizes the state to annually retain and spend all state revenues in excess of the constitutional limitation on state fiscal year spending that the state would otherwise be required to refund. The bill is a referendum that will be submitted to the voters at the statewide election held on November 5, 2019, and approval of the ballot title at the election constitutes a voter-approved revenue change to the constitutional limitation on state fiscal year spending.

If approved, an amount of money equal to the state revenues retained under this measure is designated as part of the general fund exempt account. The general assembly is required to appropriate or the state treasurer is required to transfer this money to provide funding for:

  • Public schools;
  • Higher education; and
  • Roads, bridges, and transit.

Legislative council staff will be required to specify this retained amount and its associated uses in an annual report that it currently prepares related to revenue retained and spent under referendum C. In addition, the state auditor is required to contract with a private entity to annually conduct a financial audit regarding the use of the money that the state retains and spends under this measure.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/20/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/1/2019 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/9/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/12/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/15/2019 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/16/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/16/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/23/2019 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/26/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/27/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/29/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/29/2019 Senate Third Reading Reconsidered - No Amendments
5/14/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/14/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/5/2019 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1258 Allocate Voter-approved Revenue For Education & Transportation 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: K. Becker | J. McCluskie / L. Court | K. Priola
Summary:

The bill is contingent on voters approving a related referred measure to annually retain and spend state revenues in excess of the constitutional spending limit. If the measure passes, in years when the state retains and spends revenue under the authority of the measure there will be additional revenue in the general fund exempt account (account). Section 1 of the bill requires 1/3 of this money in the account to be allocated to each of the purposes approved by voters, which are:

  • Public schools;
  • Higher education; and
  • Roads, bridges, and transit.

The general assembly is required to appropriate the money for public schools and higher education for the state fiscal year after the state retains the revenue under the authority of the voter-approved revenue change. The money appropriated for public schools must be distributed on a per pupil basis and used by public schools only for nonrecurring expenses for the purpose of improving classrooms, and it may not be used as part of a district reserve.

The state treasurer is required to transfer the remaining 1/3 of the money to the highway users tax fund (HUTF) after the state treasurer receives a report certifying the state's TABOR revenues (report). Section 3 clarifies that the report must include the money that the state keeps and spends as a result of the 2019 measure, and that this amount must be reported separately from the referendum C money in the account.

Under section 4 the money the state treasurer transfers to the HUTF is allocated 60% to the state highway fund, 22% to counties, and 18% to cities and incorporated towns. Under section 5 no more than 90% of the money allocated to the state highway fund may be expended for highway purposes or highway-related capital improvements and at least 15% must be expended for transit purposes or for transit-related capital improvements.

Section 2 includes a conforming amendment to ensure that the allocation for the referendum C money does not apply to any new revenue in the account as a result of the 2019 voter approval.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/20/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/1/2019 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/9/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/12/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/15/2019 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/16/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/16/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/23/2019 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/26/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/27/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/29/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/14/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/14/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/14/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/3/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1260 Building Energy Codes 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: C. Kipp | A. Valdez / F. Winter | K. Priola
Summary:

The bill requires local jurisdictions to adopt one of the 3 most recent versions of the international energy conservation code at a minimum, upon updating any other building code, and encourages local jurisdictions to update the Colorado energy office on any changes to the jurisdictions' building and energy codes.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/20/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment
4/11/2019 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/16/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/17/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/17/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
4/23/2019 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/26/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/27/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/13/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/13/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/13/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/29/2019 Signed by Governor
5/30/2019 Governor Became Law
5/30/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments:

HB19-1261 Climate Action Plan To Reduce Pollution 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: K. Becker | D. Jackson / F. Winter | A. Williams
Summary:

Section 1 of the bill states that Colorado shall have statewide goals to reduce 2025 greenhouse gas emissions by at least 26%, 2030 greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50%, and 2050 greenhouse gas emissions by at least 90% of the levels of greenhouse gas emissions that existed in 2005.

Section 3 specifies considerations that the air quality control commission is to take into account in implementing policies and promulgating rules to reduce greenhouse gas pollution, including the benefits of compliance and the equitable distribution of those benefits, the costs of compliance, opportunities to incentivize clean energy in transitioning communities, and the potential to enhance the resilience of Colorado's communities and natural resources to climate impacts. The commission will consult with the public utilities commission with regard to rules that affect the providers of retail electricity in Colorado.

Section 4 appropriates $281,588 from the general fund to the department of public health and environment to implement the bill, of which $93,267 is reappropriated to the department of law.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/21/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment
4/5/2019 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/9/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/15/2019 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/15/2019 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/16/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/22/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
4/22/2019 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/24/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/26/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/30/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/1/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2019 Senate Third Reading Reconsidered - No Amendments
5/1/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/13/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/13/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/13/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/28/2019 Signed by Governor
5/30/2019 Governor Became Law
5/30/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1289 Consumer Protection Act 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: M. Weissman / M. Foote | J. Gonzales
Summary:

The bill:

  • Adds "recklessly" as a culpable mental state for certain violations of the "Colorado Consumer Protection Act" (Act) so that a person violates certain provisions of the Act by acting knowingly or recklessly;
  • Increases the potential penalty for a violation of the Act brought by the attorney general or a district attorney from $2,000 to $20,000 per violation and from $10,000 to $50,000 per violation committed against an elderly person; and
  • Specifies the calculation of potential damage awards in a private civil action for violations of the Act.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/29/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
4/9/2019 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/12/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/15/2019 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/16/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/16/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
4/24/2019 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/26/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/30/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/1/2019 Senate Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/2/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/3/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/16/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/16/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/23/2019 Signed by Governor
5/23/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1298 Electric Motor Vehicle Charging Station Parking 
Position:
Calendar Notification: Friday, May 3 2019
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE (CONTINUED)
(1) in senate calendar.
Sponsors: J. Melton / K. Priola
Summary:

The bill authorizes the owner of a plug-in electric motor vehicle (electric vehicle) charging station to install a sign that identifies the station. If the sign is installed, a person is prohibited from:

  • Parking in the space if the vehicle is not an electric vehicle; and
  • Using the dedicated charging station for parking if the electric vehicle is not charging.

An electric vehicle is rebuttably presumed to not be charging if the electric vehicle is parked in a charging station and is not electrically connected to the charger for longer than 30 minutes. A person may park an electric vehicle at a charging station after the electric vehicle is fully charged in a parking lot:

  • That serves a lodging business if the person is a client of the lodging business and has parked the electric vehicle in the lot to charge overnight;
  • That serves an airport if the person is a client of the airport and has parked the electric vehicle in the lot to charge when traveling; or
  • Between the hours of 11 p.m. and 5 a.m.

The penalty for a violation is a $150 fine and a $32 surcharge.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/1/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment
4/11/2019 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Unamended to Transportation & Local Government
4/15/2019 House Committee on Transportation & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/17/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/18/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/18/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology
4/24/2019 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/26/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/2/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/3/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/16/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/16/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/30/2019 Signed by Governor
5/31/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1313 Electric Utility Plans To Further Reduce Carbon Dioxide Emissions 
Position: Amend
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: K. Becker | C. Hansen / F. Winter | K. Priola
Summary:

Section 1 of the bill authorizes payments from an existing fund for administrative expenses of the public utilities commission (PUC) to defray the costs incurred by the department of public health and environment and any other state agencies in reviewing clean energy plans submitted under section 3 of the bill.

Section 2 repeals laws that allow an electric utility to own, as rate-based property, new eligible energy resources without competitive bidding if certain conditions are satisfied.

Section 3 supplements the existing renewable energy standards statute by establishing targets for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation by utilities serving more than 500,000 customers, with the opportunity for other utilities to opt in. The targets are:

  • By 2030, an 80% reduction in carbon dioxide emission levels compared to 2005 levels; and
  • For 2050 and thereafter, a goal of a 100% reduction in carbon dioxide emission levels.

Section 3 also directs qualifying retail utilities to submit plans to the PUC as part of their ongoing resource acquisition planning process to address the clean energy targets. A clean energy plan must detail the actions and investments the utility intends to undertake, including specifying the new resources and infrastructure proposed to be used; the anticipated effects of the plan on the safety, reliability, and resilience of the overall electric system; the methods proposed for measuring carbon dioxide reductions; and the costs of implementation, which must be reasonable.

The approval process also includes participation by the division of administration within the department of public health and environment regarding the measurement of carbon dioxide emission reductions and predictions as to whether the clean energy plan will achieve the desired reductions.

A utility implementing a clean energy plan may recover its costs of implementation through rates, as approved by the PUC, and own any generating resources and infrastructure necessary to effectuate the plan. The utility is required to use a competitive bidding process to fill the cumulative resource need identified in its next electric resource plan that includes a clean energy plan filed after January 1, 2020.

Each utility that receives approval of a clean energy plan is required to report to the governor, the general assembly, the PUC, and the air quality control commission on a list of matters, including its progress in implementing the plan and in reducing carbon dioxide emissions. To address Colorado's relative lack of seamless integration into the national energy grid, the PUC is directed to open an investigatory proceeding to evaluate the costs and benefits associated with regional transmission organizations, energy imbalance markets, joint tariffs, and power pools.

Section 4 strengthens an existing provision requiring electric resource acquisition decisions to be made with consideration of "best value" employment metrics and the use of Colorado labor by requiring a utility to obtain and provide to the PUC relevant documentation on these topics, including the availability of apprenticeship programs registered with the United States department of labor.

Section 5 establishes a qualified right for a retail electric utility customer to generate, consume, store, and export to the grid any electricity produced from customer-sited renewable sources, also known as distributed generation.

Section 6 adopts the "Colorado Energy Impact Bond Act" under which electric utilities may finance the retirement of fossil-fuel-powered generation facilities and the transition to renewable energy sources by issuing low-cost corporate securities. These securities, known as Colorado energy impact bonds or "CO-EI bonds," are subject to PUC approval and required to have a rating of at least AA or AA2, must have a scheduled maturity date of 32 years or less, and are repayable through rates as part of the costs of implementing a clean energy plan.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/5/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Health & Insurance
4/17/2019 House Committee on Health & Insurance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/23/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/25/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/26/2019 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/27/2019 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/1/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
5/1/2019 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/2/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

HB19-1314 Just Transition From Coal-based Electrical Energy Economy 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: K. Becker | R. Galindo / F. Winter | K. Donovan
Summary:

The bill creates the just transition office in the division of employment and training in the department of labor and employment. The office, led by a director, will administer the following:

  • Benefits to coal transition workers to enable them to support themselves and their families and to access and complete education and training, resulting in being hired for high-quality jobs; and
  • Grants to eligible entities in coal transition communities that seek to create a more diversified, equitable, and vibrant economic future for those communities.

The office will begin to award benefits and grants on the earlier of January 1, 2023, or the date, as determined by the director, when sufficient money is available in the just transition cash fund to award just transition benefits or just transition grants, as applicable.

An electric utility that proposes to retire a coal-fueled electric generating facility shall submit to the office a workforce transition plan at least 90 days before the retirement of the facility.

The bill creates a just transition advisory committee to advise the director regarding implementation of the bill.

The bill appropriates $163,010 from the general fund to the department of labor and employment and $1,838 from the general fund to the general assembly for the implementation of the act.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/5/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
4/10/2019 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/16/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Legislative Council
4/16/2019 House Committee on Refer Amended to Legislative Council
4/18/2019 House Committee on Legislative Council Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/22/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/23/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/23/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
4/25/2019 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/26/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/29/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/30/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/1/2019 Senate Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/2/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/2/2019 Senate Third Reading Reconsidered - No Amendments
5/2/2019 Senate Third Reading Reconsidered - No Amendments
5/3/2019 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/20/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/20/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/20/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/28/2019 Signed by Governor
5/28/2019 Governor Became Law
5/28/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-006 Electronic Sales And Use Tax Simplification System 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: A. Williams / T. Kraft-Tharp | K. Van Winkle
Summary:

Sales and Use Tax Simplification Task Force. The bill requires the office of information technology (office) and the department of revenue (department), within existing resources, to conduct a sourcing method in accordance with the applicable provisions of the procurement code, and any applicable rules, for the development of an electronic sales and use tax simplification system (system). The bill also requires the office and the department to involve stakeholders to develop the scope of work.

The bill requires the general assembly to make any necessary appropriations for the initial funding and ongoing maintenance of the system from any net sales tax revenues that is credited to the general fund.

The bill specifies that on and after the date the system is online the department is required to accept any returns and payments processed through the system for state sales and use tax and for any sales and use taxes that are collected by the department on behalf of any local taxing jurisdiction.

The bill specifies that it is the general assembly's intent that a certain number of local taxing jurisdictions with home rule charters voluntarily use the system when the system comes online. Additionally, the bill states that it is the general assembly's intent that all local taxing jurisdictions with home rule charters voluntarily use the system within a specified number of years.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 1/4/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
1/22/2019 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
1/25/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
1/28/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
1/31/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
2/11/2019 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/8/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
3/8/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/11/2019 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/15/2019 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
3/19/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
4/2/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/2/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/3/2019 Sent to the Governor
4/12/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-046 Appraisal Management Company Definition 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: J. Tate / J. Arndt
Summary:

The bill amends the definition of "appraisal management company" to align with the definition in federal law.


(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 1/4/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology
1/23/2019 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
1/28/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
1/29/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
1/31/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
2/27/2019 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
3/4/2019 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/5/2019 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
3/6/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/8/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
3/14/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
3/15/2019 Sent to the Governor
3/15/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
3/25/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-077 Electric Motor Vehicles Public Utility Services 
Position: Amend
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: K. Priola | A. Williams / C. Hansen
Summary:

Currently, public utilities may provide charging ports or fueling stations for motor vehicles as unregulated services. The bill authorizes public utilities to provide these services as regulated or unregulated services and allows cost recovery.

The bill requires a public utility to apply to the public utilities commission (commission) to build facilities to support electric vehicles. Standards are set for approval. When a facility is built, the rates and charges for the services:

  • May allow a return on any investment made by a public utility at the utility's most recent rate of return on equity approved by the commission;
  • May allow for rate recovery mechanisms that allow earlier recovery of costs; and
  • May allow for performance-based incentive returns or similar investment incentives.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 1/11/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology
2/27/2019 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/4/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/5/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/6/2019 Senate Third Reading Laid Over to 03/08/2019 - No Amendments
3/8/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/8/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation & Local Government
4/9/2019 House Committee on Transportation & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/12/2019 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/17/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/17/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/18/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/19/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/26/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Not Concur - Request Conference Committee
4/30/2019 House Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Adopt Committee Report - Repass
4/30/2019 First Conference Committee Result was to Adopt Rerevised w/ Amendments
5/1/2019 Senate Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Adopt Committee Report - Repass
5/15/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/15/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/30/2019 Signed by Governor
5/31/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-085 Equal Pay For Equal Work Act 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: J. Danielson | B. Pettersen / J. Buckner | S. Gonzales-Gutierrez
Summary:

The bill removes the authority of the director of the division of labor standards and statistics in the department of labor and employment (director) to enforce wage discrimination complaints based on an employee's sex and instead permits an aggrieved person to bring a civil action in district court to pursue remedies specified in the bill.

The bill allows exceptions to the prohibition against a wage differential based on sex if the employer demonstrates that a wage differential is based upon one or more factors, including:

  • A seniority system;
  • A merit system;
  • A system that measures earnings by quantity or quality of production;
  • The geographic location where the work is performed;
  • Education, training, or experience to the extent that they are reasonably related to the work in question; or
  • Travel, if the travel is a regular and necessary condition of the work performed.

The bill prohibits an employer from:

  • Seeking the wage rate history of a prospective employee;
  • Relying on a prior wage rate to determine a wage rate;
  • Discriminating or retaliating against a prospective employee for failing to disclose the employee's wage rate history; and
  • Discharging or retaliating against an employee for actions by an employee asserting the rights established by the bill against an employer.

The bill requires an employer to announce to all employees employment advancement opportunities and job openings and the pay range for the openings. The director is authorized to enforce actions against an employer concerning transparency in pay and employment opportunities, including fines of between $500 and $10,000 per violation.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 1/17/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
2/20/2019 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/29/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/2/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/3/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/4/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/4/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
4/17/2019 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/23/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/23/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/26/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/27/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/30/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/30/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/13/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/13/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/13/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/22/2019 Signed by Governor
5/22/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-096 Collect Long-term Climate Change Data 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: Friday, May 3 2019
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(2) in house calendar.
Sponsors: K. Donovan / C. Hansen
Summary:

The bill requires the air quality control commission in the department of public health and environment to collect greenhouse gas emissions data from greenhouse gas-emitting entities, report on the data, including a forecast of future emissions, and propose a draft rule to address the emissions by July 1, 2020.

The bill appropriates $1,680,600 to the department of public health and environment from the general fund to implement the bill, of which $1,348,880 is reappropriated to the office of the governor for use by the office of information technology.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 1/23/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
3/21/2019 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/16/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/18/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/19/2019 Senate Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/22/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
4/25/2019 House Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/1/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/1/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/2/2019 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/2/2019 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/3/2019 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/3/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/17/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/17/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/29/2019 Signed by Governor
5/30/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-138 Bond Requirements For Public Projects Using Private Financing 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: F. Winter | K. Priola / S. Bird
Summary:

Under current law, when a person, company, firm, corporation, or contractor (contractor) enters into a contract with a county, municipality, school district, or, in some instances, any other political subdivision of the state to perform work in connection with a project that has specified characteristics, the contractor is required to execute performance bonds and payment bonds.

The bill specifies that some of these bonding requirements apply to certain construction contracts situated or located on publicly owned property using public or private money or public or private financing.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 2/12/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
2/28/2019 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/5/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/6/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/8/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
3/21/2019 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/25/2019 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/26/2019 House Second Reading Laid Over to 03/27/2019 - No Amendments
3/28/2019 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/29/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/1/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
4/9/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/10/2019 Sent to the Governor
4/10/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/16/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-181 Protect Public Welfare Oil And Gas Operations 
Position: Oppose
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: S. Fenberg | M. Foote / K. Becker | Y. Caraveo
Summary:

The bill prioritizes the protection of public safety, health, welfare, and the environment in the regulation the oil and gas industry by modifying the oil and gas statute and by clarifying, reinforcing, and establishing local governments' regulatory authority over the surface impacts of oil and gas development.

Current law specifies that local governments have so-called "House Bill 1041" powers, which are a type of land use authority over oil and gas mineral extraction areas, only if the Colorado oil and gas conservation commission (commission) has identified a specific area for designation. Sections 1 and 2 of the bill repeal that limitation.

Section 3 directs the air quality control commission to review its leak detection and repair rules and to adopt rules to minimize emissions of methane and other hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, and oxides of nitrogen.

Section 4 clarifies that local governments have land use authority to regulate the siting of oil and gas locations to minimize adverse impacts to public safety, health, welfare, and the environment and to regulate land use and surface impacts, including the ability to inspect oil and gas facilities; impose fines for leaks, spills, and emissions; and impose fees on operators or owners to cover the reasonably foreseeable direct and indirect costs of permitting and regulation and the costs of any monitoring and inspection program necessary to address the impacts of development and enforce local governmental requirements. Section 4 also allows a local government or oil and gas operator to request the director of the commission to convene a technical review board to evaluate the effect of the local government's preliminary or final determination on the operator's application.

Section 5 repeals an exemption for oil and gas production from counties' authority to regulate noise.

The remaining substantive sections of the bill amend the "Oil and Gas Conservation Act" (Act). The legislative declaration for the Act states that it is in the public interest to "foster" the development of oil and gas resources in a manner "consistent" with the protection of public health, safety, and welfare, including protection of the environment and wildlife resources; this has been construed to impose a balancing test between fostering oil and gas development and protecting the public health, safety, and welfare. Section 6 states that the public interest is to "regulate" oil and gas development to "protect" those values.

Currently, the Act defines "waste" to include a diminution in the quantity of oil or gas that ultimately may be produced. Section 7 excludes from that definition the nonproduction of oil or gas as necessary to protect public health, safety, welfare, the environment, or wildlife resources. Section 7 also repeals the requirement that the commission take into consideration cost-effectiveness and technical feasibility with regard to actions and decisions taken to minimize adverse impacts and repeals the limitation of the term "minimize adverse impacts" to wildlife resources.

The 9-member commission currently includes 3 members who must have substantial experience in the oil and gas industry and one member who must have training or experience in environmental or wildlife protection. Section 8 reduces the number of industry members to one and requires one member with training or substantial experience in wildlife protection; one member with training or substantial experience in environmental protection; one member with training or substantial experience in technical expertise or soil conservation or reclamation; one member who is an active agricultural producer or a royalty owner; and one member with training or substantial experience in public health. Section 9 requires the director of the commission to hire up to 2 deputy directors. The director is required to submit a report to the general assembly regarding any recommended changes to the commission. Upon receipt of a request for a technical review, the director is required to appoint technical review board members.

The Act currently specifies that the commission has exclusive authority relating to the conservation of oil or gas. Section 10 clarifies that nothing in the Act alters, impairs, or negates the authority of:

  • The air quality control commission to regulate the air pollution associated with oil and gas operations;
  • The water quality control commission to regulate the discharge of water pollutants from oil and gas operations;
  • The state board of health to regulate the disposal of naturally occurring radioactive materials and technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials from oil and gas operations;
  • The solid and hazardous waste commission to regulate the disposal of hazardous waste and exploration and production waste from oil and gas operations; or
  • A local government to regulate land use related to oil and gas operations, including specifically the siting of an oil and gas location.

Currently, an operator first gets a permit from the commission to drill one or more wells within a drilling unit, which is located within a defined area, and then notifies the applicable local government of the proposed development and seeks any necessary local government approval. Section 11 requires operators to file, with the application for a permit to drill, either: Proof that the operator has already filed an application with the affected local government to approve the siting of the proposed oil and gas location and of the local government's disposition of the application; or proof that the affected local government does not regulate the siting of oil and gas locations. Section 11 also specifies that, until the commission has promulgated rules regarding 3 specific topics and the rules have become effective, the director may refuse to issue a permit if the director determines that the permit requires additional analysis to ensure the protection of public health, safety, and welfare or the environment or requires additional local government or other state agency consultation.

Pursuant to commission rule, an operator may submit a statewide blanket financial assurance of $60,000 for fewer than 100 wells or $100,000 for 100 or more wells. Section 11 directs the commission to adopt rules that require financial assurance sufficient to provide adequate coverage for all applicable requirements of the Act. Current law allows the commission to set numerous fees used to administer the Act and sets a $200 or $100 cap on the fees. Section 11 eliminates the caps and requires the commission to set a permit application fee in an amount sufficient to recover the commission's reasonably foreseeable direct and indirect costs in conducting the analysis necessary to assure that permitted operations will be conducted in compliance with all applicable requirements of the Act.

Current law gives the commission the authority to regulate oil and gas operations so as to prevent and mitigate "significant" adverse environmental impacts to the extent necessary to protect public health, safety, and welfare, taking into consideration cost-effectiveness and technical feasibility. Section 11 requires the commission to protect and minimize adverse impacts to public health, safety, and welfare, the environment, and wildlife resources and protect against adverse environmental impacts on any air, water, soil, or biological resource resulting from oil and gas operations. Section 11 also requires the commission to adopt rules that require alternate location analyses for oil and gas facilities that are proposed to be located near populated areas and that evaluate and address the cumulative impacts of oil and gas development. Finally, section 11 directs the commission to promulgate rules to:

  • Ensure proper wellbore integrity of all oil and gas production wells, including the use of nondestructive testing of well joints and requiring certification of several categories of oil and gas workers;
  • Allow public disclosure of flowline information and to evaluate and determine when a deactivated flowline must be inspected before being reactivated; and
  • Evaluate and determine when inactive, temporarily abandoned, and shut-in wells must be inspected before being put into production or used for injection.

Current law authorizes "forced" or "statutory" pooling, a process by which "any interested person", typically an operator who has at least one lease or royalty interest, may apply to the commission for an order to pool oil and gas resources located within a particularly identified drilling unit. After giving notice to interested parties and holding a hearing, the commission can adopt a pooling order to require an owner of oil and gas resources within the drilling unit who has not consented to the application (nonconsenting owner) to allow the operator to produce the oil and gas within the drilling unit notwithstanding the owner's lack of consent. Section 12 requires that the owners of more than 50% of the mineral interests to be pooled must have joined in the application for a pooling order and that the application include either: Proof that the applicant has already filed an application with the affected local government to approve the siting of the proposed oil and gas facilities and of the local government's disposition of the application; or proof that the affected local government does not regulate the siting of oil and gas facilities. Section 12 also specifies that the operator cannot use the surface owned by a nonconsenting owner without permission from the nonconsenting owner.

Current law also sets the royalty that a nonconsenting owner is entitled to receive at 12.5% of the full royalty rate until the consenting owners have been fully reimbursed (out of the remaining 87.5% of the nonconsenting owner's royalty) for their costs. Section 12 raises a nonconsenting owner's royalty rate during this pay-back period from 12.5% to 13% and makes a corresponding reduction of the portion of the nonconsenting owner's royalty from which the consenting owners' costs are paid.

Current law requires the commission to ensure that the 2-year average of the unobligated portion of the oil and gas conservation and environmental response fund does not exceed $6 million and that there is an adequate balance in the environmental response account in the fund to address environmental response needs. Section 13 directs the commission to ensure that the unobligated portion of the fund does not exceed 50% of total appropriations from the fund for the upcoming fiscal year and that there is an adequate balance in the account to support the operations of the commission and to address environmental response needs.

Section 15 amends preemption law by specifying that both state agencies and local governments have authority to regulate oil and gas operations and establishes that local government requirements may be more stringent than state requirements.

Section 16 appropriates $770,959 to the department of natural resources to implement the act.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/1/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
3/5/2019 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Amended to Finance
3/7/2019 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/8/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/12/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
3/13/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/14/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment + Finance + Appropriations
3/18/2019 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Unamended to Finance
3/25/2019 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
3/27/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/28/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
3/29/2019 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
4/1/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/3/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
4/10/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/11/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/12/2019 Sent to the Governor
4/16/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-188 FAMLI Family Medical Leave Insurance Program 
Position: Oppose
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: F. Winter | A. Williams / M. Gray | M. Duran
Summary:

The bill creates a study of the implementation of a paid family and medical leave program in the state by:

  • Requiring the department of labor and employment (department) to contract with experts in the field of paid family and medical leave;
  • Requiring the department to make requests for information from third parties that may be willing to administer all or part of a paid family and medical leave program;
  • Creating the family and medical leave implementation task force (task force) that is responsible for recommending a plan to implement a paid family and medical leave program for the state; and
  • Requiring an actuarial study of the final plan recommended by the task force.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/7/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology
3/13/2019 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Amended to Finance
4/9/2019 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/16/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/18/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/22/2019 - No Amendments
4/22/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/24/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/25/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2019 Senate Third Reading Reconsidered - No Amendments
4/25/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/26/2019 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/29/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/29/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/30/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/1/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Pass
5/1/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Reconsider
5/15/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/15/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/29/2019 Signed by Governor
5/30/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-192 Front Range Waste Diversion Enterprise Grant Program 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: F. Winter | K. Priola / D. Jackson | L. Cutter
Summary:

Section 1 of the bill creates the front range waste diversion enterprise. The enterprise will collect a user fee on each load of waste disposed of at a landfill in the front range and credit it to the new front range waste diversion cash fund to finance the front range waste diversion grant program.

Section 2 sets the user fee at 15 cents per cubic yard per load from January 1, 2020, through December 31, 2020. The fee increases 15 cents per year so that on and after January 1, 2023, the fee is 60 cents per cubic yard per load; except that this amount is adjusted annually by inflation after January 1, 2024.

Section 3 increases the fine for littering on public or private property by inflation and credits the increased fine to the fund.

The front range is defined as the counties of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Douglas, Elbert, El Paso, Jefferson, Larimer, Pueblo, Teller, and Weld and the cities and counties of Broomfield and Denver. The following entities that are located or provide services in the front range are eligible to apply for grants: Municipalities, counties, and cities and counties; nonprofit and for-profit businesses involved in waste disposal or diversion; and institutions of higher education and public or private schools.

The enterprise shall administer the grant program and provide technical assistance to eligible entities to achieve the following municipal waste diversion goals within the front range:

  • 32% diversion by 2021;
  • 39% diversion by 2026; and
  • 51% diversion by 2036.

The board of directors of the enterprise shall submit a report by July 1 of each year to the committees of reference of the general assembly with jurisdiction over the environment regarding the grant program. The enterprise, increased user fee, and increased littering fine are repealed, effective September 1, 2029.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 3/11/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government
3/21/2019 Senate Committee on Local Government Refer Amended to Finance
4/2/2019 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/12/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/12/2019 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/15/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/16/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/19/2019 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/23/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/23/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/27/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/29/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/30/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/13/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/13/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/13/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/29/2019 Signed by Governor
5/30/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-225 Authorize Local Governments To Stabilize Rent 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: J. Gonzales | R. Rodriguez / S. Lontine | S. Gonzales-Gutierrez
Summary:

The bill repeals existing statutory language prohibiting counties or municipalities (local governments) from enacting any ordinance or resolution that would control rent on either private residential property or a private residential housing unit (collectively, private residential property). The bill authorizes local governments to enact and enforce any ordinance, resolution, agreement, deed restriction, or other measure that would stabilize rent on private residential property.
(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 4/1/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
4/15/2019 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/18/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/19/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/26/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/29/2019 - No Amendments
4/30/2019 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/02/2019 - No Amendments
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-236 Sunset Public Utilities Commission 
Position:
Calendar Notification: Friday, May 3 2019
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(4) in house calendar.
Sponsors: L. Garcia | S. Fenberg / C. Hansen | K. Becker
Summary:

Sunset Process - Senate Transportation and Energy Committee. The bill implements the recommendations of the department of regulatory agencies' sunset review and report on the public utilities commission (commission) by:

  • Authorizing the commission to promulgate rules to delegate routine, administrative transportation matters to staff and clarifying that the commission provides initial review of each case submitted for adjudication and determines whether it wishes to retain the case or to assign it to an administrative law judge or to an individual commissioner ( section 10 of the bill);
  • Providing for alternate forms of communication that a public utility may utilize to notify its customers of rate changes, including text message and e-mail, and requiring the public utility to post notice of the rate change on its public website, including a reference to the docket numbers of relevant rules or adjudicatory matters. ( section 6 );
  • Transferring the administration of the legal services offset fund from the department of law to the department of regulatory agencies ( section 11 );
  • Making technical changes regarding criminal history record checks and telecommunications ( sections 13 and 15 through 18 );
  • Repealing a requirement that an electric utility, as part of the electric utility's plan for acquisition of renewable resources, purchase a certain amount of energy from community solar gardens in the years 2011 through 2013, but delaying the repeal until 2043 to keep the legislation in place until contracts entered into pursuant to the requirement have likely all expired ( section 4 );
  • Repealing the requirement that the commission, in considering electric utilities' proposals for generation acquisition, give consideration to proposals to propose, fund, and construct integrated gasification combined cycle generation facilities ( section 3 ); and
  • Clarifying that the commission may impose a civil penalty for a violation of railroad crossing safety regulations ( section 9 ).

The bill also:

  • Directs the commission to promulgate rules to require an investor-owned utility to file with the commission, for the commission's approval, a distribution system plan regarding the utility's anticipated distribution system investments ( section 5 );
  • Requires an investor-owned utility, when submitting a filing to the commission that includes a proposed retirement of an electric generating facility, to include in the filing a workforce transition plan that provides estimates of workforce transitions that will occur as a result of retiring the electric generating facility ( section 5 );
  • Directs the commission to conduct an investigation of financial performance-based incentives and performance-based metric tracking to identify mechanisms for aligning utility operations and investments with various public benefit goals, including safety, cost efficiency, and emissions reduction. The commission must report the findings of its investigation to the general assembly 18 months after the bill's passage ( section 7 );
  • Requires the commission to open a nonadjudicatory proceeding to conduct a survey of public utility retail rates and to consider recommendations for providing rate relief in geographic areas with retail rates that are materially greater than the state average ( section 7 );
  • Directs the commission to evaluate the cost of carbon dioxide emissions in certain proceedings related to a public utility subject to the commission's jurisdiction and to promulgate rules to require those public utilities, when submitting filings to include the cost of carbon dioxide emissions related to the evaluation of electric generation and heating resources. Starting in 2020, the commission is required to establish a base cost of carbon dioxide emissions in an amount not less than $46 and shall modify the cost thereafter based on escalation rates established by a federal interagency working group; ( section 8 ); and
  • Authorizes the commission to regulate vehicle booting companies, which are private entities in the business of immobilizing motor vehicles through use of a boot, through issuance of permits and enforcement mechanisms including inspections, imposition of a civil penalty, and revocation of a permit ( sections 12 and 14 ).

The bill continues the functions of the commission for 7 years, until 2026 ( sections 1 and 2 ). The bill appropriates $467,034 for state fiscal year 2019-20 to the department of regulatory agencies for use by the public utilities commission for personal services, operating expenses, and the purchase of legal services ( section 21 ).
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/9/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
4/16/2019 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Amended to Finance
4/18/2019 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/19/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/23/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/24/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
4/30/2019 House Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Finance
5/1/2019 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/1/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/2/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/3/2019 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/3/2019 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/21/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/21/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/21/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/29/2019 Signed by Governor
5/30/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-248 State Tax System Working Group 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: J. Tate | J. Bridges / J. Singer | M. Baisley
Summary:

Joint Technology Committee. The bill requires the director of research of the legislative council, in coordination with the other nonpartisan legislative staff agencies, the department of revenue, the department of personnel, and the governor's office of information technology, to convene a state tax system working group (working group) to meet during the interim following the first regular session of the seventy-second general assembly and to conduct an analysis of the state tax system used by the department of revenue. The bill specifies the aspects of the state tax system that the working group is required to consider.

The working group is authorized to solicit input from any additional interested parties, as deemed necessary and appropriate by the working group. The working group is required to provide a progress report regarding its work to the joint technology committee and the joint budget committee and to submit a report of its findings and recommendations in connection with the state tax system to the joint technology committee, the joint budget committee, and the finance committees of the house of representatives and the senate.

For the 2019-20 state fiscal year, the bill appropriates $44,552 to the legislative department from the general fund and $30,000 to the department of revenue from the general fund for the purposes of the working group.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/17/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Legislative Council
4/18/2019 Senate Committee on Legislative Council Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/23/2019 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/24/2019 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/25/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
4/29/2019 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/1/2019 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
5/1/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/2/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/17/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/17/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/23/2019 Signed by Governor
5/23/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: Amendments

SB19-255 Gallagher Amendment Residential Assessment Rate 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: L. Court | J. Tate / L. Herod | D. Esgar
Summary:

Based on a residential target percentage that is equal to 45.69%, the bill lowers the ratio of valuation for assessment for residential real property from 7.2% to 7.15% for property tax years commencing on and after January 1, 2019, until the next property tax year that the general assembly adjusts this ratio.


(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 4/17/2019 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/23/2019 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/26/2019 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/27/2019 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/27/2019 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/29/2019 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/29/2019 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/30/2019 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/13/2019 Sent to the Governor
5/13/2019 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/13/2019 Signed by the President of the Senate
6/3/2019 Signed by Governor
6/3/2019 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes:

Fiscal Note

Amendments: