This report contains the current bills related to talent development the CWDC is tracking.

HB21-1006 Fifth-day School Enrichment Programs Funding 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: D. Esgar (D) | P. Will (R) / L. Garcia (D) | D. Hisey (R)
Summary:

The bill creates the fifth-day academic enrichment and support grant program (program) to award grants on a 3-year cycle to one or more eligible community-based nonprofit organizations (organizations) and to eligible rural school districts to provide supplemental educational programs to full-day kindergarten preschool through high school-aged children on the fifth day of the week for children in schools that have a 4-day school week.

To be eligible for a grant, organizations must, in part, have experience providing before- and after-school programs, serve a majority of children from low-income families, and have a relationship or partnership with a local school district that serves children in the program. To be eligible for a grant, a rural school district must be rural, as determined by the department of education (department), have no eligible organization operating within the rural school district's boundaries, and serve a majority of children from low-income families.

The state board of education (state board) awards program grants in a 3-year grant cycle, with an initial grant and automatic renewal of the grant for 2 years as set forth in the bill. The amount of the initial and renewal grants is determined by the state board based on the number of children served in the program and other criteria specified in the bill.

Grants must be used for one or more of the purposes specified in the bill, including to provide supplemental educational programming to support students' academic, social, and emotional development on the fifth day of a 4-day school week, to provide meals and transportation for students attending the program, and to acquire educational materials and necessary technology to provide supplemental educational programming.

The state board shall promulgate rules to establish the program, including the application process and deadlines.

Grantees are required to report annually to the department of education (department) on the use of the grant money, with the department reporting to certain committees of the general assembly.

The bill creates a fund from which to pay program grants, consisting of money appropriated or transferred to the fund by the general assembly.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/21/2021 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Fiscal Notes Status: Fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-16
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Esgar and Will-
Senate Sponsors: Garcia and Hisey--

HB21-1007 State Apprenticeship Agency 
Position:
Calendar Notification: Tuesday, June 8 2021
CONSIDERATION OF CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORT(S)
(3) in house calendar.
Sponsors: T. Sullivan (D) | D. Ortiz / J. Danielson (D) | R. Rodriguez (D)
Summary:

The bill creates the state apprenticeship agency (SAA) in the department of labor and employment (department) as a type 1 agency. The executive director of the department is required to appoint a director of the SAA (director). The purpose of the SAA is to:

  • Serve as the primary point of contact with the United States department of labor's office of apprenticeship concerning apprentices and registered apprenticeship programs; and
  • Oversee apprenticeship programs, including registration, required standards for registration, quality assurance, the promotion of apprenticeships, and the provision of technical assistance.

The director shall establish the state apprenticeship council (SAC) and an interagency advisory committee on apprenticeship (IAC). The governor and the director appoint the members of the SAC and the IAC. The SAC is charged with overseeing registered apprenticeship programs for the building and construction trades in this state and ensuring compliance with state and federal laws and standards. The IAC is charged with the same responsibilities for all other apprenticeships not in the building and construction trades.

The bill requires the SAA to accept applications for registration of apprenticeship programs beginning July 1, 2023. The SAA may deregister an apprenticeship program for noncompliance with the requirements in the bill. The SAA shall conduct a hearing upon request of the SAC or the IAC regarding issues of noncompliance and deregistration.

The director of the SAA is authorized to promulgate rules to implement the state apprenticeship registration program.


(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 6/7/2021 Senate Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Adopt Committee Report - Repass
Fiscal Notes Status: Fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-16
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Sullivan and Ortiz-
Senate Sponsors: Danielson and Rodriguez--

HB21-1010 Diverse K-12 Educator Workforce Report 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: N. Ricks | S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D) / R. Fields (D)
Summary:

The bill directs the department of higher education and the department of education to convene a workgroup on diversity in the educator workforce (workgroup).

The department of higher education and the department of education shall select the members of the workgroup, which must include those agencies, persons, and organizations specified in the bill. The departments may seek recommendations or nominations from interested stakeholders. The workgroup members must be representative of the racial and ethnic diversity of the Colorado student population by ensuring that at least 50% of the workgroup is comprised of persons from historically underrepresented minority groups.

The workgroup shall investigate barriers to the preparation, retention, and recruitment of a diverse educator workforce and shall consider strategies to increase diversity in the educator workforce. The bill includes specific issues for the workgroup to consider.

The workgroup shall submit a written report of its findings and recommendations to the education committees of the general assembly no later than September 30, 2022. The workgroup may submit interim findings and recommendations during the 2022 legislative session.

Under current law, the department of higher education reports annually concerning educator preparation programs, including enrollment, graduation rates, outcomes of graduates, and performance on assessments administered for licensure. The bill requires the department of higher education to include the required information disaggregated by the candidates' or graduates' gender, race, and ethnicity. Further, the information contained in the annual report must be posted on the department of higher education's and the department of education's websites.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/9/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: Fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-16
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Ricks-
Senate Sponsors: Fields--

HB21-1065 Veterans' Hiring Preference 
Position:
Calendar Notification: Tuesday, June 8 2021
CONFERENCE COMMITTEE ON HB21-1065
8:30 AM HCR 0112
(1) in senate calendar.
Tuesday, June 8 2021
Conference Committee on HB21-1065
8:30 a.m. Room 0112
(1) in house calendar.
Sponsors: D. Ortiz / L. Garcia (D)
Summary:

The bill creates a statutory basis to allow a private employer to give preference to a veteran of the armed forces or the National Guard and the spouse of a disabled veteran or a service member killed in the line of duty when hiring a new employee, as long as the veteran or the spouse is as qualified as other applicants for employment. The bill allows a private employer's veterans' preference employment policy to also include the preferential hiring of veterans who have been discharged from active duty within the last 10 years, as determined by the discharge date. The bill clarifies that a private employer that adopts a program that gives preferences to veterans or their spouses is not committing a discriminatory or unfair labor practice.
(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 6/14/2021 House Consideration of Second Conference Committee Report result was to Adopt Committee Report - Repass
Fiscal Notes Status: Fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-16
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Ortiz and Carver-
Senate Sponsors: --

HB21-1094 Foster Youth In Transition Program 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: L. Daugherty | T. Van Beber / R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Rankin (R)
Summary:

The bill creates the foster youth in transition program (transition program) in the state department of human services (state department) to be implemented in county departments of human or social services (county departments) throughout the state. The purpose of the transition program is to allow foster youth who meet eligibility criteria to voluntarily continue to receive certain child welfare services (services) up until the last day of the month of the youth's twenty-first birthday, or such greater age of foster care eligibility as required by federal law. Services provided through the transition program must be client-directed and developmentally appropriate as set forth in and agreed to through a voluntary services agreement (agreement) developed and entered into between the youth and county department.

The bill sets forth the eligibility criteria a youth must meet in order to voluntarily participate in the transition program. A youth who is no longer under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court and thinks he or she is eligible for the transition program may make a written request to the juvenile court (court) or county department where the youth resides. The county department shall make a determination of eligibility. If the youth is eligible, the county department shall explain the requirements and benefits of the transition program to the youth and, with the youth, develop an agreement that must be provided to the juvenile court together with a petition to renew jurisdiction with the juvenile court.

The bill describes the services and supports that will be made available to a youth through the transition program, including assistance with enrolling in medicaid; assistance with securing appropriate housing; and providing case management services, such as developing a roadmap to success, obtaining employment, obtaining critical documents and records, and accessing information about relatives and siblings, if available and appropriate.

The bill sets forth the form and content required for a petition to bring the youth under the juvenile court's jurisdiction. Upon receipt of informed, written consent of the youth, a person may be named as a special respondent in a case brought pursuant to the transition program.

A youth participating in the transition program must be appointed counsel from a list of attorneys approved by the office of the child's representative. If the youth is 18 years of age or older and, due to diminished capacity, needs a guardian ad litem, one may also be appointed.

Procedures for emancipation discharge and transition hearings (hearing) are described in the bill, including a requirement to have a personalized emancipation transition plan finalized for the youth no more than 90 days prior to a hearing. The county department shall file a report with the court at least 7 days prior to a transition hearing that includes relevant details concerning a youth's status and plans to either emancipate or enter the youth in transition program. With the youth's consent and in certain circumstances, the court may continue a transition hearing for up to 119 days.

The court shall hold periodic reviews of the youth's case at least every 6 months to ensure that the transition program is providing the youth with the necessary services to help the youth move toward permanency and a successful transition to adulthood. The bill sets forth procedures for the periodic reviews. The bill grants continuing jurisdiction in a youth's case to the juvenile court under certain situations.

The bill creates the foster youth successful transition to adulthood grant program (grant program) and associated advisory board (advisory board). The purpose of the grant program is to support eligible youth to successful transition into adulthood. Youth are eligible for services from recipients of grants from the grant program if they are between the ages of 18 and 23, were in foster care or adjudicated dependent and neglected, and are participating voluntarily. The advisory board shall meet at least 2 times per year, and the bill outlines membership.

The state department is directed to promulgate rules for the implementation of the transition program.

The bill makes conforming amendments.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/7/2021 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Fiscal Notes Status: Fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-16
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Daugherty and Van Beber-
Senate Sponsors: Zenzinger--

HB21-1097 Establish Behavioral Health Administration 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: M. Young (D) | R. Pelton (R) / R. Fields (D) | B. Gardner (R)
Summary:

The bill addresses multiple recommendations from the Colorado behavioral health task force (task force), created in 2019, related to the creation of a behavioral health administration (BHA). The BHA would be a single state agency to lead, promote, and administer the state's behavioral health priorities.

The bill requires the department of human services (department) to submit a plan for the creation and establishment of the BHA on or before November 1, 2021, to the joint budget committee and on or before January 30, 2022, to the department's committees of reference. The bill outlines what the plan must, at a minimum, include. The essential duties of the BHA, once established, are set forth.

A timeline is described for the establishment of the BHA in the department and for a future determination of what state department, if different than the department of human services, the BHA will exist.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 4/22/2021 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes Status: Fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-16
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Young and Pelton-
Senate Sponsors: Fields--

HB21-1149 Energy Sector Career Pathway In Higher Education 
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: D. Jackson (D) | B. Titone (D) / T. Story (D)
Summary:

The bill requires the Colorado work force development council (council), in collaboration with local work force boards, the department of education, superintendents of local school districts, the state board for community colleges and occupational education, and other postsecondary partners, to design a career pathway for students in the energy sector using an existing statutory model for the design and implementation of career pathways.

The bill defines "energy sector" to include, electromechanical generation and maintenance, electrical energy transmission and distribution, energy efficiency and environmental technology, and renewable energy production.

The bill creates the strengthening photovoltaic and renewable careers (SPARC) workforce development program in the department of labor and employment (department). The purpose of the SPARC program is to create capacity for and bolster training, apprenticeship, and education programs in the energy sector career pathway to increase employment in the energy sector, prioritizing in-demand and growing occupations in the energy sector.

The bill authorizes the department, the council, the state board for community colleges and occupational education (community college board), and the department of higher education to use money appropriated by the general assembly to expand the capacity of training programs and to support the energy sector career pathway, as described in the bill. The department, in consultation with the council, the community college board, and the department of higher education, shall determine the amount of money allocated to public institutions of higher education, local workforce development areas, and others. The bill creates the SPARC program fund.

The bill requires the council to submit an annual report to certain committees of the general assembly concerning the implementation of the program and the use of funding, and to present a summary of the report at the department's annual presentation to the general assembly.

The bill repeals the program, effective July 1, 2026.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/11/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: Fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-03
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Jackson-
Senate Sponsors: --

HB21-1150 Create The Colorado Office Of New Americans 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: I. Jodeh / J. Gonzales (D)
Summary:

The bill creates, initially within the department of labor and employment, the Colorado office of new Americans (ONA). The bill sets forth the ONA's duties and responsibilities and provides details regarding funding. The ONA serves as the point of contact for immigrant-serving state agencies, private sector organizations, and the public about immigrant issues in Colorado, and has as one of its central purposes the successful integration and inclusion of immigrants and refugees in our state's communities. As its main priority, the ONA is required to implement a statewide strategy to facilitate economic stability and promote successful economic, social, linguistic, and cultural integration by investing in the success of immigrants in Colorado.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/15/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: Fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-03
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Jodeh-
Senate Sponsors: --

HB21-1200 Revise Student Financial Literacy Standards 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: C. Kipp (D) | J. Rich (R) / J. Bridges (D) | P. Lundeen (R)
Summary:

The bill directs the state board of education (state board) to review, during a recurring interval specified in the bill, standards relating to the knowledge and skills that a student should acquire in school to ensure that the financial literacy standards for ninth through twelfth grade include an understanding of the costs associated with obtaining a postsecondary degree or credential and how to budget for and manage the payment for those costs, including managing student loan debt and accessing student aid through completion of the free application for federal student aid (FAFSA) and the Colorado application for state financial aid (CASFA); understanding credit cards and credit card debt; understanding homeownership and mortgages; and understanding retirement plans, including investments and retirement benefits.

The bill adds to the resources contained in the existing financial literacy resource bank created and maintained by the state board specific references relating to assessing the affordability of higher education and how to budget and pay for higher education, as well as how to manage student loan debt; understanding the purpose of and how to access and complete the FAFSA or CASFA; understanding credit cards and credit card debt; understanding the home buying process, including home loans and managing mortgage debt; and understanding retirement plans, including investments and retirement benefits.

Under current law, school districts are encouraged to adopt a financial literacy curriculum and to make completion of a course in financial literacy a graduation requirement. The bill adds assessing the affordability of higher education and how to budget and pay for higher education, as well as how to manage student loan debt, to the suggested financial literacy curriculum, as well as familiarizing students with the process and required forms to apply for financial aid, grants, and scholarships, including the FAFSA and CASFA.

Further, the bill requires school districts and charter schools, as part of the process of establishing the individual career and academic plan for a student in grades 9 through 12, to inform the student and the student's parents of the importance of completing the FAFSA and CASFA and to provide help in completing the forms, if requested.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/9/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-05
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Kipp and Rich-
Senate Sponsors: Bridges and Lundeen--

HB21-1212 Diversity Of Governor's Appointments To Boards 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: M. Soper (R) | D. Esgar (D) / D. Coram (R) | R. Fields (D)
Summary:

The bill requires the governor to appoint members of diverse groups to statewide boards, commissions, committees, and task forces authorized by the general assembly.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/24/2021 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-05
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Soper-
Senate Sponsors: --

HB21-1223 Create Outdoor Recreation Industry Office 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: B. McLachlan (D) | M. Soper (R) / T. Story (D) | D. Coram (R)
Summary:

The bill creates the outdoor recreation industry office in the office of economic development. The director of the outdoor recreation industry office is designated by and reports to the director of the office of economic development.

The outdoor recreation industry office serves as a central coordinator of outdoor recreation industry matters.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/20/2021 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-18
Amendments:
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: McLachlan, Soper-
Senate Sponsors: Story and Coram--

HB21-1241 Employee-owned Business Loan Program Modifications 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: L. Daugherty | M. Lynch / R. Rodriguez (D) | K. Priola (R)
Summary:

The bill modifies requirements for an existing loan program (program) created to assist transitions of businesses to employee-owned businesses. The bill repeals statutory eligibility requirements and requires the office of economic development (office) to establish eligibility criteria for the program. The criteria must include an annual gross revenues limitation for participation in the program for businesses, which amount may be set at up to or less than $50 million and establish requirements for the number of employees who will be offered the option to participate in the employee-ownership opportunity.

The bill also amends the requirements for the loans. It allows a loan to be used toward the purchase of the business by the employees. The bills repeals requirements related to the size of the loans and how the loans must be held and requires the office to establish requirements for the terms of the loans pursuant to existing statutory requirements.

Under the current statute, the program is repealed effective July 1, 2022. The bill extends the program through July 1, 2025.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/21/2021 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-23
Amendments:
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Daugherty and Lynch-
Senate Sponsors: Rodriguez and Priola--

HB21-1264 Funds Workforce Development Increase Worker Skills 
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: Tuesday, June 8 2021
CONSIDERATION OF SENATE AMENDMENTS TO HOUSE BILLS
(19) in house calendar.
Sponsors: T. Sullivan (D) | M. Young (D) / C. Kolker | D. Hisey (R)
Summary:

The bill creates the stimulus investments in reskilling, upskilling, and next-skilling workers program (program) as an initiative of the state work force development council (state council) to facilitate training for unemployed and underemployed workers in the state during times of substantial unemployment, defined as a statewide an unemployment rate that exceeds 4% statewide or within a work force development area . The bill appropriates $25 million for the program and directs the state council to use the money to support individuals in need of:

  • Reskilling, which supports unemployed and underemployed workers to change industries in order to return to work or obtain more appropriate work based on their skills;
  • Upskilling, which assists workers in increasing skill levels to retain or advance in their employment; or
  • Next-skilling, which supports workers in developing future-ready skills necessary for employment in the twenty-first century.

The state council, in collaboration with the department of labor and employment (department) , is directed to allocate funding as follows:

  • $2.75 million to local work force development areas and to develop for the program;
  • $3 million for a grant program developed by the state council to award grants to other partners to provide reskilling, upskilling, and next-skilling supports to eligible individuals for up to 13 months ; and
  • $1.25 million fror the department to conduct outreach and recruitment, provide access to digital platforms for career navigation, issue licenses for virtual training classes, and implement, administer, and report on the program, with any portion of the money allocated for these that is unencumbered and unexpended as of June 30, 2022, reallocated for the program and the grant program.

Starting in 2022, as part of the Colorado talent report, the state council is directed to report on the activities and outcomes resulting from the program. The program repeals on June 30, 2024.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/8/2021 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-04-06
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Sullivan and Young-
Senate Sponsors: Kolker and Hisey--

HB21-1270 Appropriation To Department Of Human Services For Supplemental Assistance Nutrition Program 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: T. Exum (D) | Y. Caraveo (D) / R. Fields (D) | B. Kirkmeyer
Summary:

The bill appropriates money to the department of human services (department) in order to seek a 50% match from the federal government for the Colorado employment first program within the supplemental nutrition assistance nutrition program. The bill requires the department to direct county departments and any third-party partners to prioritize any state or federal money received to fund employment support and job retention services and to support work-based learning opportunities for Colorado employment first participants. Any remaining money may be used to initiate and enhance current and additional state- or county-initiated third-party partnerships.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/15/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-04-09
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Exum and Caraveo-
Senate Sponsors: Fields--

HB21-1285 Funding To Support Creative Arts Industries 
Position:
Calendar Notification: Tuesday, June 8 2021
CONSIDERATION OF SENATE AMENDMENTS TO HOUSE BILLS
(30) in house calendar.
Sponsors: A. Benavidez (D) | L. Herod (D) / S. Jaquez Lewis | J. Buckner
Summary:

The bill:

  • Transfers $5 million from the general fund to the Colorado office of film, television, and media operational account cash fund and appropriates that amount to the governor's office for use in the 2021-22 state fiscal year by the Colorado office of film, television, and media in awarding performance-based incentives for film production in Colorado and for the loan guarantee program to finance production activities;
  • For the 2020-21 state fiscal year, appropriates $3.5 million, in addition to the amount appropriated pursuant to Senate Bill 20B-001, from the general fund to the creative industries cash fund for the arts relief program and removes the prohibition against an applicant that received a relief payment from the small business relief program from also receiving a relief payment under the arts relief program;
  • For the 2020-21 state fiscal year, appropriates $1.5 million from the general fund to the creative industries cash fund for allocation by the creative industries division to a nonprofit organization that administers grants to certain cultural facilities that focus on programming for and have board representation from defined historically marginalized and under-resourced communities; and
  • Transfers any money appropriated for the small business relief program that is not encumbered or expended by June 30, 2021, to the creative industries cash fund for the arts relief program.
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/14/2021 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-04-21
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Benavidez and Herod-
Senate Sponsors: Jaquez Lewis and Buckner--

HB21-1288 Colorado Startup Loan Program 
Position:
Calendar Notification: Tuesday, June 8 2021
CONSIDERATION OF SENATE AMENDMENTS TO HOUSE BILLS
(9) in house calendar.
Sponsors: J. Bacon | M. Duran (D) / J. Coleman
Summary:

The bill creates the Colorado startup loan program (program) in the office of economic development (office) as a revolving loan program to provide loans and grants to businesses seeking capital to start, restart, or restructure a business. The office may must contract with a business nonprofit organization, bank, nondepository community development financial institution, or other entity to administer the program, and does not have direct lending authority to make loans under the program .

The office or an administrator is required to establish policies for the program, including:

  • The process and deadlines for applying to the program;
  • The eligibility criteria for businesses;
  • Maximum assistance levels for loans and grants;
  • Loan terms, program fees, and underwriting and risk management policies; and
  • Reporting requirements for recipients.

The policies must be developed with the goal of generating enough return to replenish the Colorado startup loan program fund (fund) for further loan allocations.

In determining the eligibility of applicants and the size and terms of loans and grants, the office or an administrator must consider:

  • The need of the business to restructure as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic or the ability of the business to fill gaps left by closures resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic;
  • The financial losses or other impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic that may inhibit an entrepreneur from obtaining capital through traditional sources;
  • Whether the applicant or the applicant's community faces other barriers to accessing capital from traditional sources; and
  • The applicant's financial needs and repayment ability and any technical assistance the applicant is receiving the likelihood the applicant would need to be supported by a nontraditional lender .

If the administrator determines that an applicant would likely be eligible to receive a loan and may obtain more favorable terms from a traditional financial institution, the administrator must notify the applicant in a timely manner.

The office is required to work with the minority business office and other stakeholders to promote the program to businesses that are owned by women, minorities, and veterans and to businesses in rural and underserved communities. By September 1, 2021, the office is required to develop and administer a marketing initiative for the program in coordination with the minority business office and other stakeholders.

The bill creates the fund. The state treasurer is required to transfer $30 million to the fund on the effective date of the bill. The money in the fund is continuously appropriated to the office for the program.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/8/2021 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-04-21
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Bacon and Duran, Herod-
Senate Sponsors: Coleman--

HB21-1289 Funding For Broadband Deployment 
Position:
Calendar Notification: Tuesday, June 8 2021
CONSIDERATION OF SENATE AMENDMENTS TO HOUSE BILLS
(21) in house calendar.
Sponsors: C. Kennedy (D) | M. Baisley (R) / J. Bridges (D) | K. Priola (R)
Summary:

Sections 1 and 2 of the bill extend the grant award distribution and reporting dates for the connecting Colorado students grant program.Section 4 5 creates the Colorado broadband office (broadband office) in the office of information technology (office) as a type 1 entity. Section 4 5 also creates the digital inclusion grant program fund and directs the state treasurer to transfer $35 million from the general fund to the fund for use by the broadband office to implement the digital inclusion grant program to award grant money to proposed broadband deployment projects throughout the state. Grant recipients other than Indian tribe or nation recipients are prohibited from using the grant money for last-mile broadband deployment. Section 5 also defines "community anchor institution" in relation to grants awarded through the digital inclusion grant program. Section 3 requires the chief information officer in the office to appoint a director of the broadband office.Section 5 6 defines "community anchor institution", "critically unserved" , and "income-qualified plan" in relation to grants awarded by the broadband deployment board (board) for proposed broadband deployment projects throughout the state.Section 6 7 creates the broadband stimulus grant program (grant program) and requires the board to implement the grant program by awarding grant money from the broadband stimulus account created in the broadband administrative fund. The state treasurer is directed to transfer $35 million from the general fund to the account for this grant program. The board is encouraged to award money under the grant program to applicants that previously applied for broadband deployment grants from the board but were denied due to insufficient funding. An applicant seeking money under the grant program must submit an income-qualified plan to the board.Section 7 9 updates the legislative declaration related to the division of local government in the department of local affairs (division) to include language indicating the importance of broadband deployment, and section 8 10 defines terms related to the division's work in deploying broadband.Section 9 11 requires the division to submit a copy of any application it receives for broadband deployment grant money to the board broadband office for the board broadband office to review and provide a recommendation regarding the application within 30 days after the division sends the copy to the board broadband office .

Section 9 11 also creates the interconnectivity grant program and requires the division to implement the grant program by awarding grant money for proposed projects that seek to achieve regional broadband deployment and provide interconnection between communities. Projects awarded money under this grant program, except for projects awarded to Indian tribes or nations, cannot use the money awarded for last-mile broadband deployment. To finance this grant program, section 9 11 also creates the interconnectivity grant program fund into which the state treasurer is directed to transfer $5 million from the general fund. Section 10 12 appropriates:

  • $35 million from the digital inclusion grant program fund to the office of information technology for use by the Colorado broadband office to implement the digital inclusion grant program;
  • $35 million from the broadband stimulus account in the broadband administrative fund to the department of regulatory agencies for use by the board to implement the broadband stimulus grant program; and
  • $5 million from the interconnectivity grant program fund to the department of local affairs for use by the division of local government to implement the interconnectivity grant program.

Sections 8 and 13 align the bill with House Bill 21-1109, which moves the board from the department of regulatory agencies to the office of information technology. Section 14 provides that sections 8 and 13 only become effective if House Bill 21-1109 is enacted. Section 14 provides that sections 6, 7, and 12 only become effective if House Bill 21-1109 is not enacted.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/8/2021 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-04-21
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Kennedy and Baisley, Titone-
Senate Sponsors: Bridges--

HB21-1290 Additional Funding For Just Transition 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: D. Esgar (D) | P. Will (R) / S. Fenberg (D) | B. Rankin (R)
Summary:

The bill makes general fund transfers of $8 million to the just transition cash fund (fund) and $7 million to a newly created coal transition worker assistance program account (account) in the fund. The just transition office (office) is required to expend at least 70% of the money transferred to the fund in by the close of state fiscal year (FY) 2021-22 and any remaining money in state FY 2022-23 to implement the final just transition plan for Colorado and to provide supplemental funding for existing state programs that the office identifies as the most effective vehicles for targeted investment in coal transition communities. In expending the money, the office is required to develop specific criteria for prioritizing the expenditures, emphasize investment in tier one transition communities, as defined by the bill, and support specified types of programs in accordance with specified requirements and limitations.

Subject to specified requirements and limitations, the department of labor and employment (CDLE) is required to expend at least 70% of the money transferred to the account in by the close of state FY 2021-22 and any remaining money in state FY 2022-23 first for assistance programs that directly assist coal transition workers and then, if money remains, to support family and other household members of coal transition workers and create and implement a pilot program to test innovative coal transition work support programs.

The bill also:

  • Amends and supplements existing definitions of "coal transition community" and "coal transition worker" to improve the implementation of just transition;
  • For state FY 2020-21, appropriates $8 million from the fund to CDLE for use by the office to implement the final just transition plan for Colorado and to provide supplemental funding for existing state programs that the office identifies as the most effective vehicles for targeted investment in coal transition communities as specified in the bill. Any portion of the appropriation not spent by the close of state FY 2020-21 remains available for expenditure by the office for the same purposes until the close of state FY 2022-23; and
  • For state FY 2020-21, appropriates $7 million from the account to CDLE for use by CDLE first for assistance programs that directly assist coal transition workers and then, if money remains, to support family and other household members of coal transition workers and create and implement a pilot program to test innovative coal transition work support programs as specified in the bill. Any portion of the appropriation not spent by the close of state FY 2020-21 remains available for expenditure by CDLE for the same purposes until the close of state FY 2022-23.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/11/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-04-21
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Esgar and Will-
Senate Sponsors: Fenberg and Rankin--

HB21-1304 Early Childhood System 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: E. Sirota (D) | A. Garnett (D) / S. Fenberg (D) | J. Buckner
Summary:

Effective July 1, 2022, the bill creates the department of early childhood (new department) to:

  • Provide early childhood opportunities;
  • Coordinate the availability of early childhood programs and services throughout Colorado;
  • Establish state and community partnerships for a mixed delivery of child care and early childhood programs through school- and community-based providers;
  • Prioritize the interests and input of children, parents, providers, and the community in designing and delivering early childhood services and programs;
  • Prioritize the equitable delivery of resources and supports for early childhood; and
  • Unify the administration of early childhood programs and services.

The bill moves the early childhood leadership commission (commission) to the new department, effective July 1, 2022.

The bill creates a transition working group (working group) consisting of the co-chairs of the commission and representatives of certain state agencies and the governor's office, and directs the co-chairs of the commission to convene a transition advisory group (advisory group).The bill directs the working group, working with a consultant and with the advice of the advisory group, to develop a transition plan (plan) for the coordination and administration of early childhood services and programs by the new department and the departments of education, human services, and public health and environment, including, to the extent necessary, the transition of existing programs and services to the new department. The bill includes specific requirements for the plan. The governor's office must submit the plan to the joint budget committee as part of the governor's 2022 budget request, and the working group must submit the plan to the commission for approval. As soon as practicable after the plan is approved, the governor's office must submit the approved plan to the joint budget committee with any necessary budget request amendments. The working group must submit the approved plan to other committees of the general assembly by November 15, 2021, and must meet with the early childhood and school readiness legislative commission by December 1, 2021, to present the plan.

The bill also directs the working group, working with the consultant and with the advice of the advisory group, to develop recommendations for a new voluntary, universal preschool program (recommendations) to be funded partially by the recently increased sales tax on tobacco and operated by the new department beginning in the 2023-24 school year. The bill specifies requirements that the new preschool program must meet. The working group must also convene and work with a subgroup that focuses on issues relating to serving children with disabilities through the new preschool program. The working group must submit the recommendations to the commission for approval and must then submit the recommendations to the joint budget committee and other committees of the general assembly by January 15, 2022.

The bill requires the governor's office to contract with one or more private entities to consult with the working group in developing and implementing the plan and in developing the recommendations and to analyze the current use of existing early childhood programs in the state.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/7/2021 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-05-06
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Sirota and Garnett-
Senate Sponsors: Fenberg and Buckner--

HB21-1330 Higher Education Student Success 
Position:
Calendar Notification: Tuesday, June 8 2021
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE - CONSENT CALENDAR
(4) in senate calendar.
Sponsors: J. McCluskie (D) | N. Ricks / R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Kirkmeyer
Summary:

Section 1: Legislative declaration. The bill explains why appropriating money to the Colorado opportunity scholarship initiative (COSI) and to the department of higher education (department) for programs to incentivize students to re-enroll and complete postsecondary credentials and degrees, and for a grant program to assist students in completing applications for financial assistance, are appropriate and lawful uses of a portion of the money the state receives pursuant to the "American Rescue Plan Act of 2021" (ARPA).Sections 2 through 5: Distribution of federal money to support student success. Beginning with the 2021-22 state fiscal year, the bill directs the COSI advisory board to allocate to public institutions of higher education (institution) an amount appropriated to the COSI fund from money received pursuant to ARPA. To receive a distribution of its allocation, an institution must submit a student assistance plan (plan) explaining how the institution will use the money to provide financial assistance and support services to students who have some postsecondary credits but stopped attending before obtaining a credential, and first-time students who were admitted to an institution for the 2019-20 or 2020-21 academic year but did not enroll for the 2020-21 academic year. The provision of financial assistance and support services is designed to decrease student debt and increase student enrollment, retention, and completion of credentials. The COSI advisory board must review each plan based on specified criteria and may require changes to a plan before approving a distribution. At the end of the fiscal year, each institution must submit a report of how it used the money and the results achieved. The COSI director must include the information in the report that the board annually prepares. The program to distribute the federal money in this manner is repealed July 1, 2026.

The bill creates the student aid applications completion grant program (grant program) in COSI. A school district, a charter school, or a board of cooperative services that operates a high school (local education provider) that chooses to apply for a grant must require the students enrolled by the local education provider to complete the free application for federal student aid and the Colorado application for state financial aid (student aid applications) before high school graduation, unless waived under conditions specified by the local education provider. The bill specifies the contents of the application and requires the COSI board to review the applications and approve the grant awards to be paid from an amount appropriated to the COSI fund in the bill. Each grant recipient must submit an annual report concerning use of the grant money, and the COSI board must include a summary report in the annual report that the COSI board submits to the education committees of the general assembly. The grant program is repealed July 1, 2026.

Section 6: Colorado re-engaged (CORE) initiative. The bill creates the Colorado re-engaged (CORE) initiative within the department to award an associate degree to an eligible student who enrolls in a baccalaureate degree program at a 4-year institution and earns at least 70 credit hours, but stops attending before attaining the degree. The bill specifies the role of the department in implementing the CORE initiative and the role of an institution that chooses to participate in the CORE initiative. Each institution that chooses to participate in the CORE initiative must annually submit to the department a report concerning implementation of the CORE initiative. The department must review and compile the reports and submit a summary report to the education committees of the general assembly.Sections 7 through 12: Bachelor of applied science degree programs. The bill repeals the requirement that a community college or a local district college must receive approval from the Colorado commission on higher education (commission) to offer a bachelor of applied science degree program. A community college or a local district college that seeks to offer a bachelor of applied science degree program must apply to its governing board, and the governing board may approve the program based on specified criteria. If a governing board approves a bachelor of applied science degree program, the governing board must notify the commission. The bill repeals the criteria the commission must apply in approving a bachelor's degree program for a local district college.Section 13: Study of role and mission and workforce development. The bill directs the commission to convene a task force to:

  • Review the role and mission and service area of each state institution of higher education, local district college, and area technical college;
  • The interaction between the institutions, the local district colleges, the area technical colleges, and the state work force development council in supporting and improving workforce development; and
  • Review and make recommendations concerning uses of ARPA money for assistance for populations disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 public health emergency that addresses or mitigates the impacts of the public health emergency on educational disparities.

The bill describes the membership of the task force and the issues the task force must address. By December 15, 2021, the task force must submit a report of findings and recommendations to the commission and to the education committees of the general assembly. The department must post the report on the department's website.

Section 14: Completion of student aid applications. The bill creates within the department a working group appointed by the governor to recommend strategies for increasing the student completion rate for the student aid applications. The working group must submit its recommendations to the commission, the state board of education, the joint budget committee, and the education committees of the general assembly by January 15, 2022.Section 15: Classification for in-state tuition. The bill allows the governing board of an institution to classify a qualified person as an in-state student, for tuition purposes only, if the qualified person moves to the state to accept employment, the employer is paying the qualified person's tuition, and the qualified person demonstrates the intent to establish permanent domicile in the state. The qualified person is not eligible to receive the state stipend for the first year of enrollment.
(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/8/2021 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-06-01
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: McCluskie and Ricks-
Senate Sponsors: Zenzinger--

SB21-001 Modify COVID-19 Relief Programs For Small Business 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: F. Winter (D) | K. Priola (R) / L. Herod (D) | S. Sandridge (R)
Summary:

The bill moves the COVID-19 relief program for minority-owned businesses from the minority business office to the Colorado office of economic development and expands the scope of the program to allow relief payments, grants, loans, and technical assistance and consulting support to small businesses disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Additionally, the bill extends the deadlines for allocating and distributing relief payments under the small business relief program.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 1/21/2021 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-01-13
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Herod and Sandridge-
Senate Sponsors: Winter and Priola--

SB21-032 Mobile Veterans-support Unit Grant Program 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: K. Donovan (D) / D. Ortiz
Summary:

The bill establishes a mobile veterans-support unit grant program (grant program) to provide grant funding to a veteran-owned-and-focused organization to create a mobile veterans-support unit. A mobile veterans-support unit acts as a point of contact to veterans in rural areas or to veterans experiencing homelessness. The mobile veterans-support unit distributes supplies, transports veterans who do not have access to public or private transportation, and works with the office of economic development (office) to provide business and job opportunities to veterans.

The office administers the grant program.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/7/2021 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-16
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Ortiz-
Senate Sponsors: Donovan--

SB21-039 Elimination Of Subminimum Wage Employment 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: R. Zenzinger (D) | D. Hisey (R) / Y. Caraveo (D) | R. Pelton (R)
Summary:

The bill prohibits an employer that does not hold a special certificate from the United States department of labor that authorizes the employer to pay less than the minimum wage to employees whose earning capacity is impaired by age, physical or mental disability, or injury from paying an employee below minimum wage. The bill phases out subminimum wage employment for employers that hold a special certificate from the United States department of labor that authorizes the employers to pay less than the minimum wage to employees whose earning capacity is impaired by age, physical or mental disability, or injury. The bill and requires each employer that holds a special certificate to submit a transition plan to the Colorado department of labor and employment detailing how the employer plans to phase out subminimum wage employment by July 1, 2025. On and after July 1, 2025, an employer is prohibited from paying an employee with a disability less than minimum wage regardless of whether the employer was issued a special certificate.

The bill requires the employment first advisory partnership in the Colorado department of labor and employment (partnership) to:

  • Develop actionable recommendations to address structural and fiscal barriers to phasing out subminimum wage employment and successfully implementing competitive integrated employment; and
  • Report the recommendations to the general assembly.

The bill continues operation of the partnership, which is scheduled to repeal on July 1, 2021, indefinitely.

The bill requires the department of health care policy and financing (department) to add employment-related services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.$82, 641 is appropriated to the department to implement the bill. The department also expects to receive $391,075 in federal funds to implement the bill.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/11/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-16
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Caraveo and Pelton-
Senate Sponsors: Zenzinger and Hisey--

SB21-057 Private Lenders Of Student Loans Acts And Practices 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: F. Winter (D) | J. Gonzales (D) / M. Gray (D) | S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D)
Summary:

The bill expands the existing "Colorado Student Loan Servicers Act", which applies only to persons who service student loans, by adding a new part 2 covering private lenders, creditors, and collection agencies in connection with those student education loans that are not made, insured, or guaranteed under federal law and that are used for postsecondary education. The bill:

  • Requires lenders to grant a release to cosigners if certain conditions are met, including 12 months of consecutive, on-time payments, and to ensure that cosigners have access to all documentation and records related to the loan they have cosigned;
  • Expands disability discharge requirements so that a borrower or cosigner may be released from repayment obligations if permanently disabled;
  • Prohibits "robo-signing" of documents used in collection lawsuits and requires specific evidence of loan origination and chain of ownership of the debt before a loan creditor or collection agency may commence legal proceedings;
  • Prohibits auto-defaults, in which a loan is declared immediately due and payable upon the death or bankruptcy of a cosigner even when there has been no default in payments; and
  • Provides legal recourse for borrowers who are harmed by predatory acts and practices of a lender, creditor, or collection agency. A violation of the new part 2 is defined as a deceptive trade practice under the "Colorado Consumer Protection Act".
    (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/7/2021 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-16
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: -
Senate Sponsors: Winter and Gonzales, Bridges--

SB21-060 Expand Broadband Service 
Position:
Calendar Notification: Tuesday, June 8 2021
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(6) in house calendar.
Sponsors: K. Donovan (D) / D. Roberts (D)
Summary:

Section 1 of the bill amends the definition of "broadband network" to increase downstream and upstream speed requirements and adds a definition of "critically unserved", which means a household or area that lacks access to at least one provider of nonsatellite broadband service delivered at measurable speeds of at least 10 megabits per second downstream and one megabit per second upstream.Section 2 reduces the membership of the broadband deployment board (board) in the department of regulatory agencies from 16 members to 9 members.

The board is required to develop a reimbursement program to reimburse certain households for up to $600 per year for broadband service. A household is eligible to apply for reimbursement if the household:

  • Includes children enrolled in grades K-12 who receive free or reduced-price lunch through a school's lunch program; or
  • Has an income that does not exceed the higher of the federal poverty level or 30% of area median income.

The board is also required to develop a request for proposal process through which the board will solicit bids for proposed projects to serve areas of the state that the office of information technology has determined lack access to broadband service at measurable speeds of at least 10 megabits per second downstream and one megabit per second upstream. Each year, the board is required to reserve at least 50% of the money from the high cost support mechanism that is allocated for broadband deployment to award grants to proposed projects solicited through the request for proposal process.

Section 2 also limits the notice and comment period for a local entity's review of an application from 60 days to 30 days and removes provisions requiring the board to apply for specific types of federal funding because the board has completed those applications.

Section 2 further requires the public utilities commission, in consultation with the board, to:

  • Adopt rules establishing speed testing protocols by which broadband grant applicants must abide; and
  • Consider, on a biennial basis starting in 2023, whether to modify by rule the definitions of "broadband network" and "critically unserved" and certain aspects of the reimbursement program, including eligibility for reimbursement and the maximum amount of money that the board may annually reimburse a household.

Section 3 repeals the current board composition requirements on August 31, 2021.
(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 6/8/2021 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-16
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Roberts-
Senate Sponsors: Donovan--

SB21-095 Sunset Employment First Advisory Partnership 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: J. Danielson (D) / N. Ricks
Summary:

Sunset Process - Senate Business, Labor, and Technology Committee. The bill implements the recommendation of the department of regulatory agencies in its sunset review and report on the employment first advisory partnership by continuing the partnership indefinitely.The bill also creates a pilot program to create a hiring preference for people with disabilities. Each department of state government may participate in the program, but a participating department must submit a report to the state personnel director, who will submit a report to the house business affairs and labor committee and the senate business, labor, and technology committee. A candidate qualifies for the program when the candidate:

  • Meets the minimum qualifications for the position;
  • Is a person with a disability, as defined in the federal "Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990", and who has requested to participate in the pilot program; and
  • Submits proof of a disability in a form and manner specified under the pilot program.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/11/2021 Signed by the Speaker of the House
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-17
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: -
Senate Sponsors: Danielson, Rodriguez--

SB21-106 Concerning Successful High School Transitions 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: J. Coleman | K. Priola (R) / B. McLachlan (D) | M. Baisley (R)
Summary:

The bill amends the high school innovative learning pilot program (ILOP) that authorized school districts, district charter schools, and institute charter schools (local education providers) to count as full-time students high school students participating in innovative learning opportunities regardless of whether they meet the number of teacher-pupil instruction and contact hours for full-time enrollment. The bill allows a school of a school district to participate in an ILOP with a district or independently and requires all applicants to demonstrate how their innovative learning plan disproportionately benefits underserved students.

In selecting applicants to participate in the pilot program, the bill requires the department of education (department) and the state board of education (state board) to consider whether the innovative learning plan includes opportunities for students to participate in registered or unregistered apprenticeships, internships, and technical training or skills programs through an industry provider, teacher training opportunities, concurrent enrollment, and industry certificates.

Further, subject to available appropriations, the state board is encouraged to select up to 20 applicants and is not limited to choosing applicants that had part-time students in the prior year and that enroll fewer than 5,000 students.

The bill creates the fourth year innovation pilot program (pilot program) in the department of higher education to disburse state funding to postsecondary education and training programs on behalf of low-income students who graduate early from a high school participating in the pilot program prior to enrolling in the fourth year of high school or prior to enrolling in the second semester of their fourth year in high school.

The state funding awarded to a student graduating prior to enrolling in the fourth year of high school is equal to the greater of 75% of the average state share amount of the statewide average per-pupil funding for public elementary and secondary schools for the 2021-22 budget year or $3,500. The state funding for a student graduating prior to the second semester of their fourth year in high school is equal to the greater of 45% of the average state share amount of the statewide average per-pupil funding for public elementary and secondary schools for the 2021-22 budget year or $2,000. The state funding is disbursed to the postsecondary program on behalf of the eligible graduate and may be used for the eligible graduate's cost of attendance for the postsecondary program, as determined by the department of higher education. The local education provider from which the student graduated early prior to the fourth year of high school receives a portion of the state savings for school finance obligations due to the early graduation.

An eligible graduate must enroll in a postsecondary program and use the state funding award before the eligible graduate's twenty-first birthday , at which time the unused portion of within eighteen months after graduating or the state funding is forfeited.

The bill requires the department of higher education to report annually to certain committees of the general assembly certain information relating to the pilot program. The bill creates a fund for the pilot program.

The pilot program repeals, effective December 31, 2027.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/11/2021 Signed by the Speaker of the House
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-18
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: McLachlan and Baisley-
Senate Sponsors: Coleman and Priola, Bridges--

SB21-119 Increasing Access To High-Quality Credentials 
Position: Monitor
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: J. Bridges (D) | P. Lundeen (R) / D. Esgar (D) | T. Geitner (R)
Summary:

The career development success program provides financial incentives for participating school districts and participating charter schools to encourage pupils enrolled in grades 9 through 12 to enroll in and successfully complete qualified industry-credential programs; qualified internship, residency, or construction industry pre-apprenticeship or apprenticeship programs; and qualified advanced placement courses (programs and courses). The bill amends the list of qualified programs by removing residency programs and expanding pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs to include any industry program, not just construction industry programs.

The bill expands the definition of a qualified industry-credential program to include a career and technical education program that, upon completion, results in an industry-recognized credential with labor market value aligned with a high-skill, high-wage, in-demand job.

Current law requires the work force development council (council) to identify the programs and courses by identifying the jobs included in the Colorado talent report with the greatest regional and state demand, including jobs in in-demand industries. The bill requires the council to consult with relevant industries to identify the programs and courses by identifying high-skill, high-wage jobs in in-demand industries that have labor market value. Any programs and courses the council determines do not demonstrate labor market value may be removed from the council's website.

Beginning in the 2022-23 school year, and each school year thereafter, the department of education (department), in coordination with the department of labor and employment, the department of higher education, the Colorado community college system, and employers from in-demand industries, shall identify the top 10 industry-recognized credentials that may be awarded to high school students. For each identified credential, the department shall specify how the courses taken to earn the credential align with the state academic standards.

The bill requires each participating school district, each nonparticipating school district on behalf of its participating charter schools, and the state charter school institute on behalf of each participating institute charter school to report to the department the total number of pupils who successfully complete a program or course, disaggregated by the student's race, ethnicity, and gender, and whether the student is a student with a disability, an English language learner, or eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.

Current law requires each participating school district and each participating charter school to regularly communicate to all high school students the availability of programs and courses and the benefits a student receives as a result of successfully completing one of the programs or courses. The bill expands this requirement to all middle school students and the students' families.

The bill requires each participating school district and each participating charter school to communicate how industry-recognized credentials and guaranteed-transfer pathways courses that are included in such credentials are aligned with postsecondary degrees and high-skill, high-wage, in-demand jobs, and the top 10 industry-recognized credentials identified by the department. The communications must be provided in a language that the students and the students' families understand.

The bill updates the department's annual reporting requirements to the general assembly to include:

  • Whether the students participating in the programs and courses enlisted in the military or entered the workforce after graduation;
  • How money received under the career development success program was used to promote the availability of programs and courses; and
  • How the participating school district or participating charter school determined which programs and courses to offer, including how the programs and courses are aligned with local workforce needs.

No later than July 1, 2022, the department, in collaboration with the Colorado community college system, shall publish and disseminate materials through existing and relevant platforms used to engage with districts that include, at a minimum, the top 10 industry-recognized credentials and a sample communications plan for how a participating school district or participating charter school may communicate the value of credentials and experiences to students and families.

The bill requires participating school districts and participating charter schools to utilize program funding to promote access to programs and courses.

The bill requires the return on investment report to include information specifically identifying the number of high school students enrolled and the number of degrees and certificates awarded through the career development success program.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/8/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-02-23
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: -
Senate Sponsors: Bridges and Lundeen--

SB21-179 Colorado Opportunity Scholarship Initiative Advisory Board 
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Kirkmeyer / C. Kipp (D) | M. Lynch
Summary:

The bill amends the composition of the Colorado opportunity scholarship initiative advisory board.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 5/7/2021 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-10
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Kipp and Lynch-
Senate Sponsors: Zenzinger and Kirkmeyer--

SB21-185 Supporting Educator Workforce In Colorado 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Rankin (R) / B. McLachlan (D) | J. McCluskie (D)
Summary:

Current law limits the content areas in which a person who holds an adjunct instructor authorization may teach. The bill allows a school district or charter school to employ a person who holds an adjunct instructor authorization to teach in all content areas in order to address recruiting challenges and establish a diverse workforce. A person who holds an adjunct instructor authorization may be employed under the authorization only in the school district or charter school that requested the person's services. A person who holds an adjunct instructor authorization and is employed by a school district may teach only under the general supervision of a licensed professional. A school district and a charter school may not employ the person as a full-time teacher. The bill creates an exception for rural school districts. A rural school district may employ a person who holds an adjunct instructor authorization as a full-time teacher only if there are no other qualified, licensed applicants for the position.

The bill requires the department of education (department) to direct resources to publicize existing teacher preparation programs to facilitate entry into the teaching profession. The bill also requires the department to provide technical support to school districts, boards of cooperative services, and charter schools to assist them in accessing the existing programs and in recruiting individuals to pursue teaching careers.

The bill requires the state board for community colleges and occupational education to collaborate with the department and department of higher education, in collaboration with the department of education, the state board for community colleges and occupational education, and the deans of the schools of education and academic administrators in Colorado institutions of higher education, or their designees, to design a teaching career pathway for individuals to enter the teaching profession. The bill outlines the components of the teaching career pathway program.

The bill creates the teacher recruitment education and preparation program (TREP program). Two of the main objectives of the TREP program are to increase the number of students entering the teaching profession and to create a more diverse teacher workforce to reflect the ethnic diversity of the state. A qualified TREP program participant may concurrently enroll in postsecondary courses in the 2 years directly following the year in which the participant was enrolled in the twelfth grade of a local education provider. The bill outlines the selection criteria and requirements for the TREP program.

The bill creates the educator recruitment and retention program (ERR program) in the department to provide support to members of the armed forces, nonmilitary-affiliated educator candidates, and local education providers to recruit, select, train, and retain highly qualified educators across the state. The state board of education and the state board for community colleges and occupational education shall promulgate rules to implement the ERR program. The bill outlines the eligibility criteria and program services. Eligible ERR program participants may receive up to $10,000 for the tuition cost of participating in an educator preparation program. If an applicant does not fulfill the service condition of the program, the applicant is required to repay the awarded financial assistance to the department.

The bill adds criteria for the commission on higher education to select eligible applicants for the educator loan forgiveness program.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/10/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-19
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: McLachlan and McCluskie-
Senate Sponsors: Zenzinger and Rankin--

SB21-204 Rural Economic Development Initiative Grant Program Funding 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: K. Donovan (D) | B. Rankin (R) / M. Young (D) | T. Van Beber
Summary:

In 2020, the Colorado general assembly created the rural economic development initiative (REDI) grant program in the department of local affairs (department). The department, in consultation with the office of economic development, may provide grants to a new employer or the expansion of an existing employer and for projects that create diversity and resiliency in the local economies of rural communities. Or, if the department determines that a rural community needs resources or assistance because it has been impacted by a significant economic event or an anticipated event that has been announced, the department may use all or a portion of the money appropriated for the REDI grant program for the purposes of the "Rural Economic Advancement of Colorado Towns (REACT) Act".

Section 2 of the bill appropriates $5 million to the department for the REDI grant program. Section 1 ensures that the department will use all of this appropriation for the purposes of the grants or REACT permits the department to use up to 3.75% of the appropriation for any direct and indirect administrative expenses related to the REDI program grants that are awarded from the appropriation.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/15/2021 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-31
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Young and Van Beber-
Senate Sponsors: Donovan and Rankin--

SB21-229 Rural Jump-start Zone Grant Program 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: J. Danielson (D) | T. Story (D) / J. Amabile (D) | H. McKean (R)
Summary:

The bill creates the rural jump-start zone grant program (grant program) and authorizes the Colorado economic development commission (commission) to issue grants, subject to available appropriations, as follows:

  • Up to $20,000 to new businesses to establish operations;
  • Up to $40,000 to new businesses to establish operations in a tier one transition community;
  • Up to $2,500 to new businesses for each new hire; and
  • Up to $5,000 to new businesses for each new hire who is hired for operations established in a tier one transition community.

The bill also authorizes the commission to issue grants, at its discretion and subject to available appropriations, not to exceed $30,000 per applicant, to a state institution of higher education or an economic development organization that collaborates with a new business in order to support the new business in meeting the requirements for the business under the grant program.

The bill creates the rural jump-start zone grant fund account in the Colorado economic development fund, which consists of any money appropriated to the fund by the general assembly, and may be used:

  • By the commission to issue grants; and
  • For the direct and indirect costs that the Colorado office of economic development incurs, not to exceed a specified amount, to administer the grant program.

(Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.)


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/15/2021 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-31
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Amabile and McKean-
Senate Sponsors: Danielson and Story--

SB21-232 Displaced Workers Grant 
Position: Support
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Kirkmeyer / C. Kipp (D) | S. Bird (D)
Summary:

The bill appropriates money to the department of higher education for the Colorado opportunity scholarship initiative's displaced workers grant.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/15/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-03-31
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Kipp and Bird-
Senate Sponsors: Zenzinger and Kirkmeyer--

SB21-236 Increase Capacity Early Childhood Care & Education 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: T. Story (D) | J. Sonnenberg (R) / K. Tipper (D) | T. Van Beber
Summary:

The bill creates 4 new grant programs to increase capacity for early childhood care and education, improve recruitment and retention rates for early childhood educators (educators), and improve salaries for educators.

Specifically, the bill creates the following programs:

  • The employer-based child care facility grant program;
  • The early care and education recruitment and retention grant and scholarship program;
  • The child care teacher salary grant program; and
  • The community innovation and resilience for care and learning equity (CIRCLE) grant program.

The bill also eliminates the repeal dates for the child care sustainability grant program and the emerging and expanding child care grant program.

The bill appropriates money for the grant programs from the general fund as well as from federal funds from the child care development fund.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/10/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-04-06
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Tipper and Van Beber-
Senate Sponsors: Story and Sonnenberg--

SB21-239 2-1-1 Statewide Human Services Referral System 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: C. Kolker | R. Zenzinger (D) / J. Amabile (D) | M. Young (D)
Summary:

The bill expands the necessary human referral services authorized by the Colorado 2-1-1 collaborative (collaborative) to include necessary referrals for behavioral health services and other resources in the state for Coloradans, particularly for individuals who are unemployed, regardless of whether they receive benefits.

The bill requires the department of human services' office of behavioral health to contract with the collaborative to hire and train specialized personnel. The bill also requires the office of behavioral health to collaborate with the collaborative to engage in targeted marketing and outreach, and to ensure the marketing and outreach are targeted to traditionally underserved communities, such as immigrant, low-income, and communities of color.

The bill also requires the collaborative to coordinate with the department of labor and employment (department) to target, conduct outreach, and market to individuals who are unemployed, regardless of whether they receive benefits, and may need referrals for behavioral health services and other resources. The department is required to update its unemployment application web page and specified websites to include contact information for the collaborative.

The bill makes an appropriation.


(Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)

Status: 6/10/2021 Sent to the Governor
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-04-12
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Amabile and Van Beber-
Senate Sponsors: Kolker and Zenzinger--

SB21-241 Small Business Accelerated Growth Program 
Position:
Calendar Notification: NOT ON CALENDAR
Sponsors: R. Fields (D) | J. Bridges (D) / N. Ricks | L. Daugherty
Summary:

The bill creates the small business accelerated growth program (program) administered by the Colorado office of economic development (office). The program provides business development support to small businesses with 19 or fewer employees. The office is required to develop a marketing initiative for the program in coordination with the minority business office, the small business development center, and local and regional economic development entities to promote the program. The businesses selected to participate in the program have one year to use the business development support offered by the program, and $1,350,000 in grants from the Colorado startup loan fund are for participants demonstrating need and success under the program. The bill makes an appropriation.
(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)

Status: 6/14/2021 Governor Signed
Fiscal Notes Status: No fiscal impact for this bill
Date Introduced: 2021-04-12
Amendments: Amendments
Status History: Status History
House Sponsors: Ricks and Daugherty-
Senate Sponsors: Fields and Bridges--