2021 Rocky Mountain Partnership PLAN Master Bill Tracker
Bill # CommentsPositionCalendar NotificationBill TitleShort TitleSponsorsBill SummaryMost Recent StatusDate IntroducedAmendment Link
HB21-1007  Tuesday, June 8 2021
CONSIDERATION OF CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORT(S)
(3) in house calendar.  
Concerning a state apprenticeship registration program in the department of labor and employment, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. State Apprenticeship Agency T. Sullivan (D) | D. Ortiz / J. Danielson (D) | R. Rodriguez (D) The act creates the state apprenticeship agency (SAA) in the department of labor and employment (department) and specifies that it exercises its powers, duties, and functions, including rule-making, regulation, licensing, and registration, the promulgation of rates and standards, and the rendering of findings, orders, and adjudications, independently of the executive director of the department. The executive director of the department is required to appoint the director of the SAA. The purpose of the SAA is to:Serve as the primary point of contact with the United States department of labor's office of apprenticeship concerning apprentices and registered apprenticeship programs; Accelerate new apprenticeship program growth and assist in promotion and development; and Oversee apprenticeship programs, including registration, required standards for registration, certification, quality assurance, record-keeping, compliance with federal laws and standards, and provision of administrative and technical assistance. The director of the SAA is authorized to promulgate rules to implement the state apprenticeship registration program.The director of the SAA is required to establish the state apprenticeship council (SAC) and an interagency advisory committee (IAC) on apprenticeship. The governor and the director of the SAA appoint the members of the state apprenticeship council and the interagency advisory committee.The SAC is charged with overseeing registered apprenticeship programs for the building and construction trades in this state and ensuring compliance with state and federal laws and standards. The IAC is charged with the same responsibilities for all other apprenticeships not in the building and construction trades. Both entities are charged with:Registering with and maintaining the standards of the United States department of labor's office of apprenticeship and developing standards for registration for their respective apprenticeship programs; Resolving conflicts and complaints that arise between parties to apprenticeship agreements; Reviewing apprenticeship program performance; Making recommendations concerning apprenticeship programs to the director of the state apprenticeship agency; Providing technical and professional guidance and promoting best practices; Developing administrative policies to ensure safety and quality standards; Providing an annual report to the executive director of the department of labor and employment; and Advising the SAA concerning their assigned functions and formulating policies for their respective industries. The act establishes a joint resolution committee of the state apprenticeship council and the interagency advisory committee to resolve conflicts between the 2 entities and to define their respective jurisdictions.Additionally, the act requires the state apprenticeship agency to accept applications for registration of apprenticeship programs beginning July 1, 2023. The state apprenticeship agency may deregister an apprenticeship program for noncompliance with the requirements in the act. The state apprenticeship agency shall conduct a hearing upon request of the SAC or the IAC regarding issues of noncompliance and deregistration.The apprenticeship program is repealed, effective September 1, 2029, after a review of the director's functions is performed.To implement this act, $485,249 is appropriated to the department of labor and employment for use by the SAA. From this amount $85,072 is appropriated to the department of law, and $78,598 is appropriated to the office of the governor.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/23/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
HB21-1010  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning increasing the diversity of Colorado's educators in elementary and secondary public schools, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Diverse K-12 Educator Workforce Report N. Ricks | S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D) / R. Fields (D) The act directs the department of higher education and the department of education to convene a workgroup on diversity in the educator workforce (workgroup).The department of higher education and the department of education shall select the members of the workgroup. The departments may seek recommendations or nominations from interested stakeholders. The workgroup members must be representative of the racial and ethnic diversity of the Colorado student population by ensuring that at least 50% of the workgroup is comprised of persons from historically underrepresented minority groups.The workgroup shall investigate barriers to the preparation, retention, and recruitment of a diverse educator workforce and shall consider strategies to increase diversity in the educator workforce. The act includes specific issues for the workgroup to consider.The workgroup shall submit a written report of its findings and recommendations to the education committees of the general assembly no later than September 30, 2022. The workgroup may submit interim findings and recommendations during the 2022 legislative session.Under current law, the department of higher education reports annually concerning educator preparation programs, including enrollment, graduation rates, outcomes of graduates, and performance on assessments administered for licensure. The act requires the department of higher education to include the required information disaggregated by the candidates' or graduates' gender, race, and ethnicity. Further, the information contained in the annual report must be posted on the department of higher education's and the department of education's websites.The act appropriates $20,115 from the general fund and provides 0.3 FTE to the department of education to implement the act and appropriates $7,400 from the general fund to the department of higher education to implement the act.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/29/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
HB21-1054  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning a housing assistance exception to the requirement to verify lawful presence in the United States for public benefits. Housing Public Benefit Verification Requirement D. Jackson (D) / J. Gonzales (D) The act creates, unless otherwise required by federal law, a public or assisted housing benefit exception to the requirement that an applicant for federal, state, or local public benefits verify lawful presence in the United States.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/15/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
HB21-1067  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning a national assessment test score as an eligibility criterion for admission to a Colorado institution of higher education. College Admission Use Of National Test Score C. Kipp (D) | T. Exum (D) / T. Story (D) | J. Buckner  Under current law, the admission standards for first-time admitted freshmen students must use high school academic performance indicators and national assessment test scores. The act removes the requirement for a national assessment test score. The act states that the governing board of a state institution of higher education (institution) may, but is not required to, require a national assessment test score as an eligibility criterion for admission.An applicant may submit a national assessment test score to an institution that does not require a national assessment test score as an eligibility criterion and request that the institution consider the national assessment test score.Starting June 30, 2023, the department of higher education (department) shall publish and submit to the education committees an annual report of various data intended to determine whether requiring or not requiring a national assessment test score as an eligibility criterion for the admissions process provides greater diversity among institutions without causing negative student outcomes that are directly attributable to the change in the admissions process.On or before June 30, 2027, and on or before June 30, 2032, the commission on higher education shall publish and submit to the education committees a report analyzing the annual reports submitted by the department.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/25/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
HB21-1114  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the provision of internet service by a school district to enable individuals associated with the district to access a school district network. School District Provision Of Internet Service K. McCormick | M. Bradfield / S. Jaquez Lewis  With certain exceptions, a local government is currently required to obtain voter approval and meet other requirements before providing internet access (advanced service) to the public. The act specifies that these requirements do not apply to a school district or board of cooperative services providing advanced service that enables students, teachers, and staff members of the district to access a school-owned and operated network to facilitate remote learning.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/18/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
HB21-1117  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the ability of local governments to promote the development of new affordable housing units pursuant to their existing authority to regulate land use within their territorial boundaries. Local Government Authority Promote Affordable Housing Units S. Lontine (D) | S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D) / J. Gonzales (D) | R. Rodriguez (D) The act clarifies that the existing authority of cities and counties to plan for and regulate the use of land includes the authority to regulate development or redevelopment in order to promote the construction of new affordable housing units. The provisions of the state's rent control statute do not apply to any land use regulation that restricts rents on newly constructed or redeveloped housing units as long as the regulation provides a choice of options to the property owner or land developer and creates one or more alternatives to the construction of new affordable housing units on the building site. The act also states that it should not be construed to authorize a local government to adopt or enforce any ordinance or regulation that would have the effect of controlling rent on any existing private residential housing unit in violation of the existing statutory prohibition on rent control.The act prohibits a local government from exercising this new regulatory authority unless the local government demonstrates, at the time it enacts a land use regulation for the purpose of exercising such authority, it has taken one or more among a list of specified actions to increase the overall number and density of housing units within its jurisdictional boundaries or to promote or create incentives to the construction of affordable housing units.The act requires the department of local affairs to offer guidance to assist local governments in connection with its implementation.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/28/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
HB21-1125  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning suspending the administration of state assessments for the 2020-21 school year. Suspend State Assessments In 2020-21 School Year E. Sirota (D) | B. McLachlan (D) / R. Zenzinger (D) | D. Coram (R)  The bill suspends the administration of state assessments, contingent on a change to federal law or a waiver of federal law from the federal department of education, for the following instructional areas for the 2020-21 school year: Science administered to students enrolled in grades 5, 8, and 11; Math administered to students enrolled in grades 3 through 8; English language arts administered to students enrolled in grades 3 through 8; and Social studies administered to students enrolled in grades 4 and 7. The bill prohibits a school district from using student academic growth measures or student performance measures when evaluating teachers and principals for the 2020-21 school year. The bill requires a school or a school district to implement the school plan type that was assigned in the preceding school year. The bill requires the department of education, in determining the number of school years that a school or school district is on performance watch, to exclude the 2019-20 and 2020-21 school years, and count the 2021-22 school year as if it were consecutive to the 2018-19 school year. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  3/5/2021 House Committee on Education Postpone Indefinitely
2021-02-19 No amendments found
HB21-1149  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning supporting an energy sector career pathway for Colorado, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Energy Sector Career Pathway In Higher Education D. Jackson (D) | B. Titone (D) / T. Story (D) The act requires the Colorado work force development council (council), in collaboration with local work force boards, the department of education, superintendents of local school districts, the state board for community colleges and occupational education (community college board), and other postsecondary partners, to design a career pathway for students in the energy sector using an existing statutory model for the design and implementation of career pathways. The act defines "energy sector" to include electromechanical generation and maintenance, electrical energy transmission and distribution, energy efficiency and environmental technology, and renewable energy production.The act creates the strengthening photovoltaic and renewable careers (SPARC) workforce development program (SPARC program) in the department of labor and employment (department). The purpose of the SPARC program is to create capacity for and bolster training, apprenticeship, and education programs in the energy sector career pathway to increase employment in the energy sector, prioritizing in-demand and growing occupations in the energy sector. The department, the council, the community college board, and the department of higher education shall use money appropriated by the general assembly to expand the capacity of training programs and support the energy sector career pathway, as described in the act. The department, in consultation with the council, the community college board, and the department of higher education, shall determine the amount of money allocated to public institutions of higher education, local workforce development areas, and others. The act creates the SPARC program fund.By November 1, 2022, and each November 1 thereafter, the act requires the council to submit an annual report to the house of representatives business affairs and labor committee, energy and environment committee, and education committee, or their successor committees, and to the senate business, labor, and technology committee, transportation and energy committee, and education committee, or their successor committees , concerning the implementation of the SPARC program and the use of funding, and to present a summary of the report at the department's annual presentation to the general assembly. The act repeals the program, effective July 1, 2026.For the 2021-22 state fiscal year, the act appropriates:$90,048 and 1.3 FTE to the department from the SPARC program fund for one-stop workforce center contracts and the Colorado work force development council; and $1,724,590 to the department of higher education from the SPARC program fund for the community college board and state system community colleges.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/16/2021 Governor Signed
2021-03-03 Amendments
HB21-1164  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning reductions in the property tax credits that apply to school districts' total program mill levies for purposes of funding the "Public School Finance Act of 1994". Total Program Mill Levy Tax Credit D. Esgar (D) | A. Garnett (D) / R. Zenzinger (D) | S. Fenberg (D) For the 2020 property tax year, the existing statute corrects the total program mill levies for school districts that are not subject to constitutional property tax revenue restrictions but whose mill levies were erroneously reduced. Each school district that levies a higher number of mills as a result of the correction must grant a tax credit for the number of mills by which the levy is increased.The act requires the department of education to adopt a correction schedule to begin phasing out the tax credits in the 2021 property tax year. The correction schedule must apply consistently to each affected school district; must require each district's tax credit to phase out as quickly as possible, but by no more than one mill per year; and must ensure that the tax credits are fully phased out in 19 years.The act specifies that, until the general assembly determines that stabilizing the state budget no longer requires a reduction in the appropriation for the state share of total program, the general assembly shall annually ensure that the savings to the state share that occurs as a result of the decrease in the temporary property tax credits is appropriated to fund a portion of the state share of total program.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/11/2021 Governor Signed
2021-03-05 Amendments
HB21-1200  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning financial literacy standards for public schools, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Revise Student Financial Literacy Standards C. Kipp (D) | J. Rich (R) / J. Bridges (D) | P. Lundeen (R) The act directs the state board of education (state board) to review, during a recurring interval specified in the act, standards relating to the knowledge and skills that a student should acquire in school to ensure that the financial literacy standards for ninth through twelfth grade include an understanding of the costs associated with obtaining a postsecondary degree or credential and how to budget for and manage the payment for those costs, including managing student loan debt and accessing student aid through completion of the free application for federal student aid (FAFSA) and the Colorado application for state financial aid (CASFA); understanding credit cards and credit card debt; understanding homeownership and mortgages; and understanding retirement plans, including investments and retirement benefits.The act adds to the resources contained in the existing financial literacy resource bank created and maintained by the state board specific references relating to assessing the affordability of higher education and how to budget and pay for higher education, as well as how to manage student loan debt; understanding the purpose of and how to access and complete the FAFSA or CASFA; understanding credit cards and credit card debt; understanding the home buying process, including home loans and managing mortgage debt; and understanding retirement plans, including investments and retirement benefits.The act adds assessing the affordability of higher education and how to budget and pay for higher education, as well as how to manage student loan debt to the suggested financial literacy curriculum that a school district is encouraged to adopt. Further, the act requires school districts and charter schools, as part of the process of establishing the individual career and academic plan for a student in grades 9 through 12, to inform the student and the student's parents of the importance of completing the FAFSA and CASFA and to provide help in completing the forms, if requested.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/22/2021 Governor Signed
2021-03-05 Amendments
HB21-1258  Tuesday, June 8 2021
CONSIDERATION OF SENATE AMENDMENTS TO HOUSE BILLS
(7) in house calendar.  
Concerning establishing a temporary program to facilitate youth mental health services in response to identified needs, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Rapid Mental Health Response For Colorado Youth D. Michaelson Jenet (D) | K. Van Winkle (R) / J. Buckner | R. Woodward (R) The act establishes a temporary youth mental health services program (program) in the office of behavioral health within the department of human services (department) to facilitate access to mental health services, including substance use disorder services, for youth to respond to identified mental health needs, including those needs that may have resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic. The program reimburses providers for up to 3 mental health sessions with a youth and may provide additional reimbursement subject to available money.As soon as practicable, but no later than August 1, 2021, the department is required to enter into an agreement with a vendor to create, or use an existing, website or web-based application as a portal available to youth and providers to facilitate the program.The program is repealed, effective June 30, 2022.The act appropriates $9,000,000 to the department of human services from the general fund to implement the act.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/18/2021 Governor Signed
2021-04-06 Amendments
HB21-1259  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the process for funding local education providers for extended learning opportunities to address disrupted learning. Extended Learning Opportunities J. Bacon / R. Fields (D) | J. Sonnenberg (R) To the extent possible, the department of education (department) is directed to streamline the application process and other requirements relating to the award of money to local education providers, including school districts, charter schools, and other authorized local education providers (local education providers), as defined in the act, to implement one or more extended learning opportunities to address COVID-19 learning impacts. The department is authorized to administer the programs as part of a single combined application, reporting, and evaluation process created by the department.Extended learning opportunities are defined in the act to include, in part, summer school programming, extended school days or extended school weeks, high-impact tutoring, creative enrichment tied to academic gains, social-emotional supports, and additional mental health supports tied to academic success.The combined application allows a needs-based approach to identify the programs and services that meet the needs of the eligible local education provider and allows the department to help match the local education provider with funding sources. In addition to a combined application, the department is authorized to streamline local-education-provider reporting to the department and department reporting to the general assembly and align reporting deadlines.The local education provider shall establish an internal progress-monitoring system to monitor progress using family- and community-informed practices to measure extended learning opportunities program effectiveness through student educational gains.The department shall ensure that eligibility requirements, application provisions, allowable uses of funding, data collection and reporting, and any other requirements specific to the program or funding source are met for all programs or services administered pursuant to this section.If required by law and subject to available funding, the department shall evaluate one or more extended learning opportunities implemented across local education providers using a common set of evaluation criteria and metrics.The state board may adopt any rules necessary for the implementation of the combined application, reporting, and evaluation process.The general assembly may appropriate money to the department for use by local education providers to implement extended learning opportunities.The act repeals the statute, effective July 1, 2026.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/7/2021 Governor Signed
2021-04-06 Amendments
HB21-1264  Tuesday, June 8 2021
CONSIDERATION OF SENATE AMENDMENTS TO HOUSE BILLS
(19) in house calendar.  
Concerning the allocation of state money for workforce development activities to increase the skills of Colorado workers, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Funds Workforce Development Increase Worker Skills T. Sullivan (D) | M. Young (D) / C. Kolker | D. Hisey (R) The act creates the workers, employers, and workforce centers cash fund (fund) for the purpose of responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency and the negative economic impacts of the pandemic as follows:To provide assistance to unemployed workers, including job training; To provide assistance to households; For programs, services, or other assistance for populations disproportionately impacted by the public health emergency, including programs or services to address or mitigate the effects on education; To provide aid to impacted industries, small businesses, and nonprofit organizations through the provision of related educational and job training services; and For related administrative costs. The act directs the state treasurer to transfer to the fund $200 million of the money the state received pursuant to the federal "American Rescue Plan Act of 2021" (ARPA) and $25 million from the general fund. Of this amount, the act appropriates a total of $75 million for use in the 2021-22 state fiscal year, allocated in the following amounts and for the following purposes related to assisting unemployed workers, aiding impacted industries, and addressing or mitigating the impacts of the public health emergency on education:$25 million for the investments in reskilling, upskilling, and next-skilling workers program (program), which is an initiative of the state work force development council (state council) to facilitate training for unemployed and underemployed workers in the state during times of substantial unemployment, defined as an unemployment rate that exceeds 4% statewide or within a work force development area. Of this amount, the state council, in collaboration with the department of labor and employment (department), is directed to allocate: $20.75 million to local work force development areas for the program; $3 million for a grant program developed by the state council to award grants to other partners to provide reskilling, upskilling, and next-skilling supports to eligible individuals for up to 13 months; and $1.25 million for the department to conduct outreach and recruitment, provide access to digital platforms for career navigation, issue licenses for virtual training classes, and implement, administer, and report on the program, with any portion of the $1.25 million that is unencumbered and unexpended as of June 30, 2022, reallocated for the program and the grant program. $35 million for programs and initiatives established under the "Work Force Innovation Act", including $17.5 million for allocation to work force development boards for the work force innovation grant program to promote innovation to improve outcomes for learners and workers by helping prepare Coloradans for well-paying, quality jobs; and $17.5 million for use by the state council for statewide work force innovation initiatives; $10 million to the department of higher education for allocation by the state board for community colleges and occupational education to specified career and technical education providers to expand equipment, facility, and instruction capacity in key career and technical education job demand areas identified in the annual Colorado talent report; and $5 million to the department of education for the adult education and literacy grant program. As required by ARPA, the money appropriated in the act must be obligated by December 31, 2024, and expended by December 31, 2026, and recipients of ARPA money must comply with reporting requirements specified in ARPA and by the state controller.The act also authorizes the department to receive and expend money from the general fund or any other state source that is appropriated by the general assembly or passed through another entity for purposes of distributing state funds to work force development areas to implement work force development activities. The act specifies that state money appropriated or passed through to the department is not subject to limits imposed on the use of money received by the department pursuant to specified federal laws.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/23/2021 Governor Signed
2021-04-06 Amendments
SB21-013  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning measures to address student learning loss occurring as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Reversing COVID-related Learning Loss R. Fields (D) / J. Bacon | M. Froelich (D) The act directs the department of education (department) to identify educational products, strategies, and services that have demonstrated effectiveness in identifying and reversing student learning loss that has been caused by the suspension of in-person learning. The department must create and maintain a resource bank of examples of educational products, explanations of and instructions for implementing strategies and educational services, and models of professional development programs related to using the products and implementing the strategies and services. School districts, boards of cooperative services, and charter schools (local education providers) may submit information to the department concerning products, strategies, and services that they have used with success, and the department must include them in the resource bank. The department must also provide information concerning public or private nonprofit entities that local education providers may work with in providing student support. The act also directs the department, to the extent possible within existing resources, to provide technical assistance to local education providers upon request.The act recognizes the amount of federal COVID-relief money that the department is expected to receive and encourages the department to use as much as possible of the amount received to fund learning recovery initiatives. The act requires the department to prepare a report concerning the department's use of the federal money received and submit the report to the education committees of the general assembly and post the report on the department's website.The act directs the board of cooperative services that administers the statewide supplemental online and blended learning program (administering BOCES) to partner with local education providers for delivery of supplemental online learning recovery courses for students in elementary and secondary schools. The administering BOCES and local education providers are also directed to partner with nonprofit entities and community-based organizations to expand the availability of, and students' access to, supplemental online learning recovery courses. The administering BOCES and the local education providers must provide information concerning the availability of the learning recovery courses and other supplemental online courses.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/13/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
SB21-027  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning emergency supplies for Colorado babies and families, and, in connection therewith, providing diapering essentials through diaper distribution centers and making an appropriation. Emergency Supplies For Colorado Babies And Families B. Pettersen (D) | J. Danielson (D) / S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D) | K. Tipper (D) The act creates the diaper distribution program (program) in the department of human services (department) to provide diapering essentials to eligible individuals. The department shall solicit interest and cost distribution proposals from diaper distribution centers to administer the program for not more than twelve months after which the department shall commence a selection process that complies with the state procurement code. Diapering essentials must be made available to all parents, guardians, or family members of a child who wears diapers and resides in Colorado.The act allows the department to contract with a third party vendor to solicit, vet, award, and monitor food pantry assistance grants.The act appropriates $2,000,000 from the general fund to the department of human services for use by the office of self sufficiency to implement the diaper distribution program and $5,000,000 from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to the department of human services for use by the office of self sufficiency for the food pantry assistance grant program.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  7/6/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
SB21-029  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning in-state tuition classification for members of American Indian tribes with historical ties to Colorado. Colorado American Indian Tribes In-stateTuition S. Fenberg (D) / A. Garnett (D) | A. Benavidez (D) Beginning with the 2021-22 academic year, the act requires a state institution of higher education (institution) to adopt a policy to offer in-state tuition classification to students who would not otherwise qualify for in-state tuition if the student is a federally recognized member of a federally recognized American Indian tribe with historical ties to Colorado, as designated by the Colorado commission of Indian affairs in partnership with history Colorado.The institution may count the student as a resident student for any purpose within the tuition classification statutes and for purposes of resident enrollment requirements. The student is eligible to apply for the Colorado opportunity fund stipend and state-funded financial aid, and may be eligible for private financial aid programs.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/28/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
SB21-039  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the elimination of subminimum wage employment by providing supports to ensure successful transitions for individuals currently working in subminimum wage jobs, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Elimination Of Subminimum Wage Employment R. Zenzinger (D) | D. Hisey (R) / Y. Caraveo (D) | R. Pelton (R) Beginning July 1, 2021, the act prohibits an employer from paying an employee whose earning capacity is impaired by age, physical or mental disability, or injury less than minimum wage if the employer does not hold a special certificate issued on or before June 30, 2021, by the United States department of labor that authorizes the employer to pay wages below minimum wage to those employees. The act phases out subminimum wage employment for employers that hold a special certificate and by June 30, 2022, requires each employer that holds a special certificate to submit a transition plan to the department of health care policy and financing (department) detailing how the employer plans to phase out subminimum wage employment by July 1, 2025. On and after July 1, 2025, an employer is prohibited from paying an employee with a disability less than minimum wage regardless of whether the employer was issued a special certificate.The act requires the employment first advisory partnership in the Colorado department of labor and employment (partnership) to:Develop actionable recommendations to address structural and fiscal barriers to phasing out subminimum wage employment and successfully implementing competitive integrated employment; and Report the recommendations to specified committees of the general assembly. The act also continues operation of the partnership, which was scheduled to repeal on July 1, 2021, indefinitely.The act requires the department to seek federal approval to add employment-related services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities under the state's medicaid waiver services.$90,691 is appropriated to the department to implement the act. The department also expects to receive $409,885 in federal funds to implement the act.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/29/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
SB21-053  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning adjustments to school funding for the 2020-21 budget year, and, in connection therewith, making appropriations. Adjustments To School Funding Fiscal Year 2020-21 D. Moreno (D) | R. Zenzinger (D) / J. McCluskie (D) | B. McLachlan (D) The actual funded pupil count and the actual at-risk pupil count for the 2020-21 budget year were lower than anticipated when the appropriation amount was established during the 2020 legislative session, resulting in a decrease in total program funding for the 2020-21 budget year. In addition, local property tax revenue and specific ownership tax revenue were less than anticipated, resulting in a decrease in the local share of total program funding.The act declares the general assembly's intent to maintain total program funding at the dollar amount of the original appropriation made during the 2020 legislative session, thereby reducing the budget stabilization factor.The act appropriates additional funding for the 2020-21 budget year for districts that experienced a percentage decrease in total program funding from that estimated during the 2020 legislative session that was greater than the district's percentage decrease in funded pupil count from that estimated during the 2020 legislative session. In addition, the act includes additional funding for districts that have an overall reduction in total program funding that is more than 2% below the districts' estimated total program funding during the 2020 legislative session.Charter schools in districts that qualify for additional funding receive a per-pupil share of the additional funding. If an institute charter school experiences a reduction in total program funding from that estimated during the 2020 legislative session and is in an accounting district that receives additional funding, the institute charter school receives a per-pupil amount of additional funding.Additionally, the act includes an appropriation for rural school funding pursuant to section 22-54-142.For the 2020-21 state fiscal year, the act appropriates to the department of education:$14,710,777 and $4,578,464 from the general fund for additional state funding for school districts and district charter schools; $569,849 from the general fund for additional state funding for institute charter school; and $25,000,000 from the rural schools cash fund for rural school funding.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/15/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-16 Amendments
SB21-106  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning measures to improve successful transitions from high school to post-high school training, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Concerning Successful High School Transitions J. Coleman | K. Priola (R) / B. McLachlan (D) | M. Baisley (R) The act amends the high school innovative learning pilot program (ILOP) that authorizes school districts, district charter schools, and institute charter schools (local education providers) to count as full-time students high school students participating in innovative learning opportunities regardless of whether they meet the number of teacher-pupil instruction and contact hours for full-time enrollment. The act allows a school of a school district to participate in an ILOP with a district or independently and requires all applicants to demonstrate how their innovative learning plan disproportionately benefits underserved students.In selecting applicants to participate in the pilot program, the act requires the department of education (department) and the state board of education (state board) to consider whether the innovative learning plan includes opportunities for students to participate in registered or unregistered apprenticeships, internships, and technical training or skills programs through an industry provider, teacher training opportunities, concurrent enrollment, and industry certificates.Further, subject to available appropriations, the state board is encouraged to select up to 20 applicants and is not limited to choosing applicants that had part-time students in the prior year and that enroll fewer than 5,000 students.The act creates the fourth-year innovation pilot program (pilot program) in the department of higher education to disburse state funding to postsecondary education and training programs on behalf of low-income students who graduate early from a high school participating in the pilot program prior to enrolling in the fourth year of high school or prior to enrolling in the second semester of their fourth year in high school.The state funding awarded to a student graduating prior to enrolling in the fourth year of high school is equal to the greater of 75% of the average state share amount of the statewide average per-pupil funding for public elementary and secondary schools for the 2021-22 budget year, as calculated during the 2021 legislative session, or $3,500. The state funding for a student graduating prior to the second semester of their fourth year in high school is equal to the greater of 45% of the average state share amount of the statewide average per-pupil funding for public elementary and secondary schools for the 2021-22 budget year, as calculated during the 2021 legislative session, or $2,000. The state funding is disbursed to the postsecondary program on behalf of the eligible graduate and may be used for the eligible graduate's cost of attendance for the postsecondary program, as determined by the department of higher education. The local education provider from which the student graduated early prior to the fourth year of high school receives a portion of the state savings for school finance obligations due to the early graduation. An eligible graduate must enroll in a postsecondary program within 18 months after graduating or the state funding is forfeited.The act requires the department of higher education to report annually to the department, the governor's office of state planning and budgeting, the joint budget committee, and the education committees of the general assembly concerning certain information specified in the act relating to the pilot program. The act creates the fourth-year innovation pilot program fund for the pilot program. The pilot program repeals, effective December 31, 2027.For the 2021-22 state fiscal year, the act appropriates:$220,115 and 0.3 FTE to the department of education for the high school innovative learning pilot program; and $44,222 and 0.6 FTE to the department of higher education to implement the for the fourth-year innovation pilot program .(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  7/7/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-18 Amendments
SB21-119  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning increasing access in high school to high-quality credentials within the career development success program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Increasing Access To High-Quality Credentials J. Bridges (D) | P. Lundeen (R) / D. Esgar (D) | T. Geitner (R) The career development success program provides financial incentives for participating school districts and participating charter schools to encourage pupils enrolled in grades 9 through 12 to enroll in and successfully complete qualified industry-credential programs; qualified internship, residency, or construction industry pre-apprenticeship or apprenticeship programs; and qualified advanced placement courses (programs and courses). The act amends the list of qualified programs by removing residency programs and expanding pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs to include any industry program, not just construction industry programs.The act expands the definition of a qualified industry-credential program to include a career and technical education program that, upon completion, results in an industry-recognized credential with labor market value aligned with a high-skill, high-wage, in-demand job.Current law requires the work force development council (council) to identify the qualified programs and courses by identifying the jobs included in the Colorado talent report with the greatest regional and state demand, including jobs in in-demand industries. The act requires the council to consult with relevant industries to identify the programs and courses by identifying high-skill, high-wage jobs in in-demand industries that have labor market value. Any programs and courses the council determines do not demonstrate labor market value may be removed from the council's website.Beginning in the 2022-23 school year, and each school year thereafter, the department of education (department), in coordination with the department of labor and employment, the department of higher education, the Colorado community college system, and employers from in-demand industries, shall identify the top 10 industry-recognized credentials that may be awarded to high school students. For each identified credential, the department shall specify how the courses taken to earn the credential align with the state academic standards.The act requires each participating school district, each nonparticipating school district on behalf of its participating charter schools, and the state charter school institute on behalf of each participating institute charter school to report to the department the total number of pupils who successfully complete a program or course, disaggregated by each student's race, ethnicity, and gender, and whether each student is a student with a disability, an English language learner, or eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.Current law requires each participating school district and each participating charter school to regularly communicate to all high school students the availability of programs and courses and the benefits a student receives as a result of successfully completing one of the programs or courses. The act expands this requirement to all middle school students and the students' families.The act requires each participating school district and each participating charter school to communicate how industry-recognized credentials and guaranteed-transfer pathways courses that are included in such credentials are aligned with postsecondary degrees and high-skill, high-wage, in-demand jobs, and the top 10 industry-recognized credentials identified by the department. The communications must be provided in a language that the students and the students' families understand.The act updates the department's annual reporting requirements to the general assembly to include:Whether the students participating in the programs and courses enlisted in the military or entered the workforce after graduation; How money received under the career development success program was used to promote the availability of programs and courses; and How the participating school district or participating charter school determined which programs and courses to offer, including how the programs and courses are aligned with local workforce needs. No later than July 1, 2022, the department, in collaboration with the Colorado community college system, shall publish and disseminate materials through existing and relevant platforms used to engage with districts that include, at a minimum, the top 10 industry-recognized credentials and a sample communications plan for how a participating school district or participating charter school may communicate the value of credentials and experiences to students and families.The act requires participating school districts and participating charter schools to utilize program funding to promote access to programs and courses.The act requires the return on investment report to include information specifically identifying the number of high school students enrolled and the number of degrees and certificates awarded through the career development success program.The act appropriates $20,000 from the general fund to the department of education to implement the act.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/30/2021 Governor Signed
2021-02-23 Amendments
SB21-148  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the creation of the financial empowerment office in the department of law, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Creation Of Financial Empowerment Office J. Gonzales (D) | C. Kolker / D. Esgar (D) | K. Tipper (D) The act creates the financial empowerment office (office) and the director of the office (director) in the department of law to grow the financial resilience and well-being of Coloradans through specified community-derived goals and strategies. The director is appointed by the attorney general and may hire staff as necessary to perform the duties and functions of the office. The office also consists of a manager who is appointed by the director.The office is authorized to partner with governmental bodies, community organizations, financial institutions, local service providers, philanthropic organizations, and other organizations as necessary to achieve the purposes of the office. The office is also authorized to develop or promote new or existing:Methods to increase access to safe and affordable financial products; Tools and resources that advance, increase, and improve Colorado residents' financial management; Community-informed strategies that dismantle systemic barriers to building ownership and wealth for all, especially low-income communities and communities of color; and Tools that promote financial stability such as those that assist with service navigation, eviction avoidance, or connections to income supports. The financial empowerment office is required to:Support the organization of community efforts to define and lead financial resilience strategies; Align, support, and build ties to build financial education and well-being in communities across the state; Establish a council to assist the director; Work with stakeholders to increase access to safe and affordable credit-building loans and financial products and to identify products and practices that may undermine financial stability; Develop technical assistance to launch or expand local financial coaching and counseling efforts; Raise money to support coaching, safe and affordable banking, and potential loan funds; and Track community feedback on consumer financial abuses. The department of law is required to report on affordable banking access in Colorado and other specified information as part of its presentation under the "State Measurement for Accountable, Responsive, and Transparent (SMART) Government Act".(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/24/2021 Governor Signed
2021-03-02 Amendments
SB21-172  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning creation of a fund to assist in increasing the amounts paid to persons employed by local education providers. Educator Pay Raise Fund J. Danielson (D) | L. Garcia (D) / S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D) | D. Ortiz  The act creates the educator pay raise fund (fund), which consists of money that the general assembly may appropriate or transfer to the fund. The creation of the fund is conditioned on passage of a ballot measure by November 2027 that increases state tax revenue and requires the revenue to be deposited into the fund. The department of education (department) must distribute any money appropriated from the fund to assist school districts, charter schools, and boards of cooperative services in increasing teacher salaries and the hourly wage paid to other employees.The act creates the educator pay raise fund task force (task force) to recommend a process by which the department will disburse money from the fund to school districts and charter schools. The act specifies considerations that the process must address, including requiring that a school district or charter school must at least maintain the level of funding it provides for educator salaries and wages from revenue other than money received from the fund. The president of the senate and the speaker of the house of representatives must appoint the task force members who represent specific constituencies listed in the act. The task force must submit its recommendations to the education committees of the general assembly by January 15, 2022.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  7/7/2021 Governor Signed
2021-03-04 Amendments
SB21-179  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the composition of the Colorado opportunity scholarship initiative advisory board. Colorado Opportunity Scholarship Initiative Advisory Board R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Kirkmeyer / C. Kipp (D) | M. Lynch  The act amends the composition of the Colorado opportunity scholarship initiative advisory board.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/7/2021 Governor Signed
2021-03-10 Amendments
SB21-181  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning state agencies addressing health disparities in Colorado, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Equity Strategic Plan Address Health Disparities R. Fields (D) | D. Coram (R) / L. Herod (D) | Y. Caraveo (D) The act renames the existing "health disparities grant program" as the "health disparities and community grant program" (program) and expands the program to authorize the office of health equity (office) to:Award grants from money currently transferred from the prevention, early detection, and treatment fund to the health disparities grant program fund (fund) for the purpose of positively affecting social determinants of health to reduce the risk of future disease and exacerbating health disparities in underrepresented populations; and Award grants from any additional money appropriated by the general assembly to the fund to community organizations to reduce health disparities in underrepresented communities through policy and systems changes regarding the social determinants of health. On or before July 1, 2022, and continuing every 2 years thereafter, the department of public health and environment (department), in collaboration with the health equity commission and other stakeholders, is required to conduct an assessment and publish a report concerning health disparities and inequities that includes an assessment of the impact of social determinants of health on health disparities and inequities and recommended strategies to begin to address such inequities.Within 6 months after the publication of the department's first report, the governor is required to convene the health equity commission to develop an equity strategic plan and to ensure that there is coordination in equity-related work across state agencies to address the social determinants of health. Additional state agencies are added to and required to participate on the commission and are required to develop an equity strategic plan in the agency's respective area.$4,872,818 is appropriated to the department for use by the office of health equity to implement the act. Of the total amount appropriated, $4,821,035 is from the general fund and $51,783 is from the health disparities grant program fund.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  7/6/2021 Governor Signed
2021-03-10 Amendments
SB21-232  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning an appropriation to the department of higher education for the Colorado opportunity scholarship initiative's displaced workers grant. Displaced Workers Grant R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Kirkmeyer / C. Kipp (D) | S. Bird (D) The act appropriates $15,000,000 from the workers, employers, and workforce centers cash fund and the federal coronavirus recovery fund to the department of higher education for the Colorado opportunity scholarship initiative's displaced workers grant.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/24/2021 Governor Signed
2021-03-31 Amendments
SB21-236  NOT ON CALENDARConcerning increasing the capacity of quality early childhood education through grant programs, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Increase Capacity Early Childhood Care & Education T. Story (D) | J. Sonnenberg (R) / K. Tipper (D) | T. Van Beber  The act creates 4 new grant programs to increase capacity for early childhood care and education, improve recruitment and retention rates for early childhood educators (educators), and improve salaries for educators. The act makes an appropriation.Specifically, the act creates the following programs:The employer-based child care facility grant program; The early care and education recruitment and retention grant and scholarship program; The child care teacher salary grant program; and The community innovation and resilience for care and learning equity (CIRCLE) grant program. The act also eliminates the repeal dates for the child care sustainability grant program and the emerging and expanding child care grant program.The act appropriates money for the grant programs from the general fund as well as from federal funds from the child care development fund.The act makes the following appropriations:During the 2020 special session, the general assembly appropriated money for early childhood education. The act states that any of that money not expended prior to July 1, 2021, is further appropriated to the department of human services for the next fiscal year for the same purpose. For the 2020-21 state fiscal year, $8,800,000 is appropriated to the department of human services for use by the office of early childhood. This appropriation is from the general fund. To implement this act, the office of early childhood may use this appropriation as follows: $100,000 for administration, which amount is based on an assumption that the office will require an additional 1.0 FTE; and $8,700,000 for the employer-based child care facility grant program. Any money appropriated but not expended prior to July 1, 2021, is further appropriated to the department of human services for use by the office of early childhood for the 2021-22 state fiscal year for the same purposes. For the 2021-22 state fiscal year, $320,241,576 is appropriated to the department of human services for use by the office of early childhood. This appropriation is from federal funds from child care development funds. To implement this act, the office of early childhood may use this appropriation as follows: $292,700,664 for the child care sustainability grant program, which amount is based on an assumption that the office will require an additional 3.0 FTE. Any money appropriated for the child care sustainability grant program but not expended prior to July 1, 2022, is further appropriated for use by the office of early childhood for the 2022-23 state fiscal year for the same purposes; $16,800,000 for the community innovation and resilience for care and learning equity (CIRCLE) grant program, which amount is based on an assumption that the office will require an additional 1.0 FTE. Any money appropriated to the community innovation and resilience for care and learning equity (CIRCLE) grant program but not expended prior to July 1, 2022, is further appropriated for use by the office of early childhood for the 2022-23 state fiscal year for the same purposes; $7,200,000 for the early care and education recruitment and retention grant and scholarship program, which amount is based on an assumption that the office will require an additional 4.0 FTE; $3,000,000 for the child care teacher salary grant program, which amount is based on an assumption that the office will require an additional 1.0 FTE; and $540,912 for the administration, monitoring, compliance, and reporting requirements associated with the money appropriated in this subsection (3), which amount is based on an assumption that the office will require an additional 4.0 FTE. For the 2021-22 state fiscal year, $58,622,936 is appropriated to the department of human services for use by the office of early childhood. This appropriation is from federal funds from child care development funds. The office of early childhood may use this appropriation as follows: $23,845,252 for the child care assistance program; $32,455,511 for child care grants for quality and availability and federal targeted funds requirements, which amount is based on an assumption that the office will require an additional 6.0 FTE; $2,150,000 for the early childhood mental health consultation program, which amount is based on an assumption that the office will require an additional 1.0 FTE; and $172,173 for the administration, monitoring, compliance, and reporting requirements associated with the money appropriated in this subsection (4), which amount is based on an assumption that the office will require an additional 2.0 FTE.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/16/2021 Governor Signed
2021-04-06 Amendments