Arapahoe County 2023 Legislative Report
Bill # PositionShort TitleSponsorsBill SummaryStatus HistoryMost Recent StatusFiscal Note
HB23-1024Amend Relative And Kin Placement Of A Child S. Gonzales-Gutierrez | E. Epps (D) / T. Exum (D) | K. Van Winkle (R) The act establishes several measures that protect the best interests of a child or youth and that will not hinder reunification with the child's or youth's family when the child or youth has been temporarily placed outside the family home with a relative or kin (relative), including: Permitting a relative to appeal when denied placement of the child or youth with the relative; Requiring the department of human services (department), to use reasonable efforts to help a relative whose barrier to caring for the child or youth is a lack of resources; Amending the court's advisement to the parent so it is consistent with changes to statute; Specifying what information should be included in a notice to relatives when the child or youth has been removed from the child's or youth's home; Requiring that courts give preference to a relative unless placement with that relative would negatively affect the child's or youth's mental, physical, or emotional needs, or hinder reunification with the child's or youth's family; Providing options for a relative to be allowed to participate in a child's or youth's care and planning; Creating a rebuttable presumption that placement with a relative is in the child's or youth's best interest. The presumption may be rebutted by a preponderance of the evidence, giving primary consideration to the child's or youth's mental, physical, and emotional needs, including the child's or youth's preference regarding placement. Requiring that caseworkers inform the court of efforts to identify and place a child or youth with a relative. Foster parents who have the child or youth in their care for 12 months or more may intervene, as a matter of right, with or without counsel, following adjudication. The purpose of intervention is to provide knowledge or information concerning the care and protection of the child or youth, including the child's or youth's mental, physical, and emotional needs. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year: $13,879 is appropriated to the department of human services from the general fund for use by the division of child welfare for Colorado TRAILS for the implementation of this act; and The general assembly anticipates that the department of human services will receive $7,473 in federal funds for use by the division of child welfare to assist in the implementation of this act. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/9/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
2/8/2023 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
3/1/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/10/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/14/2023 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/15/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/16/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/5/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Witness Testimony and/or Committee Discussion Only
4/12/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/18/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/20/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/21/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/12/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/15/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/15/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
6/5/2023 Signed by Governor
6/5/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1026Monitor Family Time For Grandparents R. English (D) / R. Fields (D) Current law allows a grandparent or great-grandparent to seek a court order granting the grandparent or great-grandparent the right to visit grandchildren or great-grandchildren when there is or has been a child custody case or a case concerning the allocation of parental responsibilities relating to that child. The act allows a court to appoint a child's legal representative to represent the child's best interests in a matter seeking to grant grandparents or great-grandparents family time (family time) with grandchildren or great-grandchildren. The act clarifies that in determining the best interests of a child for the purpose of family time, the court shall presume that any parental determination regarding family time is in the best interests of the child. A grandparent or great-grandparent may overcome the presumption by proving through clear and convincing evidence that the family time is in the child's best interests. The act changes the term "visitation rights" to "grandparent or great-grandparent family time". APPROVED by Governor May 23, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/9/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
3/21/2023 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/23/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/24/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over to 03/27/2023 - No Amendments
3/30/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over to 04/03/2023 - No Amendments
4/3/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over to 04/10/2023 - No Amendments
4/10/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/11/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/12/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/19/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/21/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/24/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/26/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/23/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1027Amend Parent And Child Family Time J. Joseph (D) | M. Weissman (D) / F. Winter (D) The act defines "family time," changes the term "visitation" to "family time" in various places in statute, creates new requirements for dependency and neglect court proceedings, and requires the task force on high-quality family time (task force) to commission and evaluate a state study on family time. On and after January 1, 2024, the act: Requires county departments of human or social services (county departments) to encourage maximum family time; Allows the court and the state department of human services (department) to rely on community resources, foster parents, or relatives to provide transportation or supervision for family time; Creates a presumption that supervised family time is supervised by relatives, kin, foster parents, or other supports (supports) and occurs in the community. This presumption can be rebutted if the health or safety of the child is at risk or if these supports are unavailable or unwilling to provide supervision. Limits the court's ability to restrict or deny family time to situations in which the child's safety or mental, physical, or emotional health is at risk; Requires the court to order family time in the least restrictive setting; Requires county departments to provide information to the court about proposed family time and participation in family time; Prohibits the court or county departments from limiting family time as a sanction for a parent's failure to comply with court-ordered treatment plans so long as the child's safety or mental, physical, or emotional health is not at risk; Prohibits the court, county departments, parents, or supports from limiting family time as a sanction for the child's behavior or as an incentive to improve the child's behavior; Requires the court and county departments to consider parents' and childrens' preferences when determining supervision, location, and timing of family time; States that a person's inclusion in family time does not confer rights not otherwise granted by law; and Gives the state board of human services the authority to promulgate rules to implement the provisions. The act appropriates $142,000 from the general fund to the judicial department for use by the office of the respondent parents' counsel for personal services and $13,879 from the general fund to the department for use by the division of child welfare for Colorado TRAILS. The act also anticipates an appropriation of $7,473 in federal funds for use by the division of child welfare. APPROVED by Governor June 1, 2023 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE June 1, 2023 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE January 1, 2024 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/9/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
2/8/2023 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/10/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/11/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/13/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/16/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
4/12/2023 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/18/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/20/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/21/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/1/2023 Signed by Governor
6/1/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1031 Mental Health Professionals Reporting Exemption T. Story (D) | J. Willford (D) / F. Winter (D) Under current law, every health-care provider is required to report specified information about an individual known to the provider to have a diagnosis of or a positive test for a sexually transmitted infection to the department of public health and environment or a local public health agency. The act exempts from this reporting requirement a mental health professional who is not engaged in testing a patient for, diagnosing a patient with, or treating a patient with a sexually transmitted infection. APPROVED by Governor April 10, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/9/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
2/7/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/10/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
2/13/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/15/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
3/9/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/14/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/15/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/16/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
3/20/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
3/31/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/3/2023 Sent to the Governor
4/3/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/10/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1054 Property Valuation L. Frizell (R) / B. Pelton (R)  Most real property is reassessed every odd-numbered year. The bill establishes a one-time exception by making the reassessment cycle beginning on January 1, 2021, a 4-year cycle so that the next reassessment cycle will begin in 2025 instead of 2023. Under current law, for the 2023 property tax year, the actual value used for purposes of valuation for assessment is reduced for commercial real property by $30,000 and for residential real property by $15,000. The bill eliminates these reductions. The bill also sets the assessment rates for nonresidential real property and multi-family residential real property for the 2024 property tax year, so that they are the same rates as for the 2023 property tax year. Lastly, the bill ensures that the actual value of property used for purposes of valuation for assessment does not increase by more than 5% between 2022 and 2025, for property that does not have an unusual condition which results in an increase or decrease in actual value. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/9/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
3/9/2023 House Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1057 Amenities For All Genders In Public Buildings K. McCormick (D) | S. Vigil (D) / S. Jaquez Lewis (D) Effective January 1, 2024, the act requires each newly constructed building and each building with qualifying restroom renovations that is wholly or partly owned by a state department, state agency, state institution of higher education, county, city and county, or municipality (public entity) to: Provide a non-gendered restroom facility or a multi-stall non-gendered facility on each floor where restrooms are available in a newly constructed building and wherever a restroom is accessible to the public in a building in which a restroom is being renovated; Ensure that all single-stall restrooms are not gender specific restrooms; Allow for the use of multi-stall restrooms by any gender if certain facility features are met under the International Plumbing Code and the Colorado Fuel Gas Code; Provide at least one safe, sanitary, and convenient baby diaper changing station that is accessible to the public on each floor where there is a public restroom in a newly constructed building and wherever a restroom is accessible to the public in a building in which a restroom is being renovated, in each gender-specific restroom if only gender-specific restrooms are available, and in each non-gendered single-stall or multi-stall restroom or provide such a changing station in an easily accessible location with equivalent privacy and amenities as a restroom; Ensure that each baby diaper changing station is cleaned with the same frequency as the restroom in which it is located, or restrooms on the same floor or in the space if it is not within a restroom, and maintained, repaired, and replaced as necessary to ensure safety and ease of use. Beginning July 1, 2024, but no later than July 1, 2026, a building that is wholly or partially owned or leased by a public entity must ensure that signage for the building or the portion of the building leased or owned by the public entity complies with the following signage requirements, subject to available appropriations: Include signage indicating the presence of a baby diaper changing station with a pictogram that is void of gender in all restrooms with baby diaper changing stations, include signage with a pictogram void of gender in all non-gendered restrooms, and include signage with a pictogram void of gender in all single-stalled restrooms; and Indicate in the central building directory, if such a directory exists, the location of any baby diaper changing station and of any non-gendered restroom with a pictogram void of gender. The act requires the department of personnel to complete a survey that determines the number and locations of signs needed to comply with the act signage requirements and requires the survey be provided to the general assembly and the capital development committee. The requirements of the act pertaining to baby diaper changing stations and providing a non-gendered single-stall restroom or a non-gendered multi-stall restroom in specified locations do not apply: To the extent that compliance with a requirement would result in failure to comply with applicable building standards governing the right of access for individuals with disabilities; To a project that has already progressed through the design review process, budgeting, and final approval by the governing body that has final approval over capital construction project expenditures as of the effective date of the act, or to a building designated as a certified historic structure. Beginning on July 1, 2025, the act requires a building that is wholly or partially owned by a public entity that is a newly constructed building that is accessible to employees or enrolled students, or a building undergoing a qualifying restroom renovation to: Provide a non-gendered single-stall restroom or a non-gendered multi-stall restroom; Ensure that any single-stall restroom is not a gender-specific restroom; and Allow for the use of a multi-stall restroom by any gender if certain facility features are met pursuant to the International Plumbing Code or the Colorado Fuel Gas Code as adopted by the state plumbing board. The act clarifies that an employee with a designated workplace in a public building may undertake the complaint process for alleged discriminatory or unfair practices including the failure to comply with providing the required amenities to all genders, as required, with the Colorado civil rights division charged with the enforcement of the Colorado anti-discrimination act. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, $450,000 is appropriated from the general fund to the department of personnel for use by the office of the state architect. To implement the act, the office may use $400,000 for statewide planning services and $50,000 for a restroom survey of state-owned buildings. APPROVED by Governor May 24, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/13/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs
2/13/2023 House Committee on State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/21/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/21/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/24/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
5/3/2023 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/4/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/4/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/5/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
5/7/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/24/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1058 Child-occupied Facility Lead-based Paint Abatement R. Dickson / J. Buckner (D) Current law defines "child-occupied facility" for the purposes of lead-based paint abatement as a building or portion of a building that is visited by a child on 2 or more days within any week, with each visit totaling 6 or more hours. The act reduces the total daily visit time to 3 or more hours. APPROVED by Governor March 31, 2023 EFFECTIVE March 31, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/13/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
1/25/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
1/30/2023 House Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
1/31/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
1/31/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
3/2/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/7/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/8/2023 Senate Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/9/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/21/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
3/22/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
3/23/2023 Sent to the Governor
3/31/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1075 Wildfire Evacuation And Clearance Time Modeling M. Snyder (D) | J. Joseph (D) / T. Exum (D) The act requires the office of emergency management (office) to study the efficacy and feasibility of local or interjurisdictional emergency management agencies with jurisdiction in a wildfire risk area to integrate evacuation and clearance time modeling into the emergency management plans that such an agency is required to adopt for its area. The report must be completed on or before December 1, 2023, and the office must report the findings of the study to specific committees of the general assembly during the 2024 legislative session. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, $45,000 is appropriated from the general fund to the department of public safety for program administration related to the office of emergency management. APPROVED by Governor May 12, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 12, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/19/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Agriculture, Water & Natural Resources
3/13/2023 House Committee on Agriculture, Water & Natural Resources Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/10/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/10/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/11/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/14/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Agriculture & Natural Resources
4/20/2023 Senate Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/26/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/26/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/27/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/4/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/5/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/5/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/12/2023 Governor Signed
5/15/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1076 Workers' Compensation L. Daugherty (D) / J. Marchman (D) Section 1 of the act increases the limit on medical impairment benefits based on mental impairment from 12 weeks to 36 weeks. Section 2 removes language authorizing an employee to petition the division of workers' compensation in the department of labor and employment (division) for the replacement of any artificial member, glasses, hearing aid, brace, or other external prosthetic device, including dentures. The treating physician must deem such replacement necessary. Section 3 allows an employee to request an expedited hearing when the employee's temporary total disability benefits end based on an attending physician's written release to return to regular employment. Section 4 specifies that when a physician recommends medical benefits after maximum medical improvement, the benefits admitted by the insurer or self-insured employer are not limited to any specific medical treatment. Current law requires an insurance carrier to provide an independent medical examiner and all other parties a complete copy of all medical records in its possession pertaining to an injury. Section 5 limits the medical records required to be provided to records relevant to the injury. Section 5 also specifies how the division is required to determine the amount and allocation of costs to be paid by the parties for an independent medical examination. Section 6 allows a prehearing administrative law judge to issue interlocutory orders resolving disputes regarding the content and format of the independent medical examiner's medical record packet, indigency status, and the allocation of independent medical examiner costs. Current law states that, in an unappealed case, a contingent attorney fee exceeding 20% of the amount of contested benefits is presumed to be unreasonable. Section 7 increases the amount to 25%. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, $731,640 is appropriated to the department of labor and employment from the from the workers' compensation cash fund for use by the division of workers' compensation in implementing the act. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/19/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Business Affairs & Labor
2/2/2023 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/18/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/18/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/19/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/21/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology
5/2/2023 Senate Committee on Business, Labor, & Technology Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/4/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/4/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/5/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/5/2023 Signed by Governor
6/5/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1090Support Limit Metropolitan District Director Conflicts M. Weissman (D) / R. Rodriguez (D)  For any proposed metropolitan district that has any property within its boundaries that is zoned or valued for assessment as residential, section 1 of the bill prohibits requires the service plan to include a prohibition on the purchase of district debt by any entity with respect to which any director of the district has a conflict of interest necessitating disclosure under current law. Section 2 prohibits a board of county commissioners from approving a service plan for such a metropolitan district unless the service plan includes the prohibition. Section 3 prohibits a court from considering a petition for the organization for such a metropolitan district unless the service plan includes the prohibition. Section 2 4 prohibits a member of the board of a metropolitan district that approved the issuance of any debt while the member was serving on the board from acquiring any interest in the debt individually or on behalf of any organization or entity for which the board member is engaged as an employee, counsel, consultant, representative, or agent unless the debt is acquired indirectly through an investment fund and the member has no input into or control over the individual securities that the fund purchases. Section 3 5 states that proof of a violation of the prohibition set forth in section 2 4 is proof that the violator has breached the actor's fiduciary duty and the public trust. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  1/19/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
2/7/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/10/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/13/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/17/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
2/21/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/23/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
3/28/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1100Support Restrict Government Involvement In Immigration Detention N. Ricks (D) | L. Garcia (D) / S. Jaquez Lewis (D) | J. Gonzales (D) Beginning on January 1, 2024, the state and any local government in the state or any agency, officer, employee or agent of the state or a local government (governmental entity) is prohibited from: Entering into an agreement for the detention of individuals in an immigration detention facility that is owned, managed, or operated by a private entity; Selling any government-owned property for the purpose of establishing an immigration detention facility that is or will be owned, managed, or operated by a private entity; Paying any costs related to the sale, purchase, construction, development, ownership, management, or operation of an immigration detention facility that is or will be owned, managed, or operated by a private entity; Receiving any payment related to the detention of individuals in an immigration detention facility that is owned, managed, or operated by a private entity; or Giving financial incentives or benefits to a private entity in connection with the sale, purchase, construction, development, ownership, management, or operation of an immigration detention facility that is or will be owned, managed, or operated by a private entity. Nothing in the act prohibits a governmental entity from providing heath and safety resources to individuals who are being detained for immigration purposes or a local government from contracting for health, utility, and sanitation services to immigration detention facilities. Beginning on January 1, 2024, a governmental entity is prohibited from entering into or renewing an agreement for payment to house or detain individuals for federal civil immigration purposes (immigration detention agreement). In addition, a governmental entity with an existing immigration detention agreement is required to exercise the termination provision contained in the agreement by January 1, 2024, or as soon as possible within the terms of the immigration detention agreement if termination by January 1, 2024 is not possible. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/23/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
2/7/2023 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/10/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/24/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
2/27/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/1/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
4/17/2023 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/19/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/20/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/4/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/5/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/5/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
6/6/2023 Signed by Governor
6/6/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1107 Crime Victim Services Funding M. Duran (D) | R. Pugliese (R) / B. Gardner (R) | F. Winter (D) The Colorado crime victim services fund and the state domestic violence and sexual assault services fund are scheduled for repeal in 2027. The act continues both funds indefinitely and clarifies that the money in each fund that originated from the federal coronavirus state fiscal recovery fund must comply with the requirements in the federal "American Rescue Plan Act of 2021" and related state law. The act requires the state treasurer to transfer $3 million from the general fund to the state domestic violence and sexual assault services fund on July 1, 2023. APPROVED by Governor May 25, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 25, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/23/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
3/1/2023 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/25/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/25/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/26/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/26/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Appropriations
5/2/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/2/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/25/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1113Support County Impact Notes By Legislative Council E. Hamrick (D) | L. Frizell (R)  The bill creates a new county impact note that analyzes the potential impact of a pending bill on a county or a city and county. The legislative council staff will draft county impact notes for up to 20 legislative measures per session, unless more are allowed by the director of research of the legislative council. A county, a city and county, a statewide organization or organizations representing counties or cities and counties, and the department of local affairs are required to cooperate with and provide information for the legislative council staff in preparing county impact notes.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/23/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
2/14/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1115Support Repeal Prohibition Local Residential Rent Control J. Mabrey (D) | E. Velasco (D) / R. Rodriguez (D)  The bill repeals statutory provisions prohibiting counties and municipalities from enacting any ordinance or resolution that would control rent on private residential property or a private residential housing unit (rent control) and sets the following guidelines for the enactment of rent control: Rent control must be uniformly applied among all renters that are similarly situated; Rent control must be uniformly applied among all private residential properties and private residential housing units that are similarly situated; except that: For 15 years from the date on which the first certificate of occupancy was issued, no rent control may be applied; Rent control may be applied to a mobile home or mobile home park regardless of the date the mobile home or mobile home park was built or the date a certificate of occupancy was issued; and No rent control may be applied to housing units provided by nonprofit organizations and regulated by fair market rents published by the United States department of housing and urban development or any other similar federal or state program; and Rent control that limits the amount of an annual rent increase must not impose a limit less than the percentage increase in the consumer price index plus three percentage points plus reasonable increases reflective of the actual costs of substantial renovations. Regardless of the first two of these guidelines, the bill permits a local government to have or adopt an ordinance or regulation that is expressly intended and designed to increase the supply of affordable housing. The bill also makes a conforming amendment. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  1/23/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
2/15/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/21/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/24/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
2/27/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/1/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/25/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1117Support Affidavit Support Eligibility Public Benefits I. Jodeh (D) | L. Garcia (D) / J. Gonzales (D) | N. Hinrichsen (D) The act eliminates the requirement for a person who is lawfully residing in the state, a legal immigrant who is a resident of the state, or a documented individual to refrain from executing an affidavit of support for the purpose of sponsoring a documented individual while the person is receiving public services or medical assistance. County departments responsible for administering benefits programs under the department of health care policy and financing and the department of human services shall identify and review all current county guidance materials that reference a prohibition on sponsorship as a condition of eligibility for benefits and shall remove all such references from verbal and digital communications and from all physical materials currently provided to applicants or beneficiaries. APPROVED by Governor April 11, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/24/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
2/8/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/13/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
2/14/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/15/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
3/16/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/21/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/23/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/24/2023 Senate Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/27/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/31/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/3/2023 Sent to the Governor
4/3/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/11/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1120Monitor Eviction Protections For Residential Tenants J. Joseph (D) | D. Ortiz (D) / R. Fields (D) | F. Winter (D) The act requires a landlord and residential tenant to participate in mandatory mediation prior to commencing an eviction action if the residential tenant receives supplemental security income, federal social security disability insurance, or cash assistance through the Colorado works program (collectively, "cash assistance"). The landlord and residential tenant do not have to participate in mediation if the residential tenant did not disclose or declined to disclose in writing to the landlord that the residential tenant receives cash assistance, the complainant is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that offers opportunities for mediation to residential tenants, or the complainant is a landlord with 5 or fewer single-family rental homes and no more than 5 total rental units. Failure to comply with mandatory mediation is an affirmative defense. The act prohibits a law enforcement officer from executing a writ of restitution against a residential tenant for at least 30 days after the entry of judgment if the residential tenant receives cash assistance, except in the case in which a court has ordered a judgment for possession for a substantial violation or in the case of a landlord with 5 or fewer single-family rental homes and no more than 5 total rental units. The act requires a written demand to include a statement that a residential tenant who receives cash assistance has a right to mediation prior to the landlord filing an eviction complaint with the court. The act requires a written rental agreement to include a statement that current law prohibits source of income discrimination and requires a non-exempt landlord to accept any lawful and verifiable source of money paid directly, indirectly, or on behalf of a person. The act prohibits a written rental agreement from including a waiver of mandatory mediation or a clause that allows a landlord to recoup any costs associated with mandatory mediation. The act appropriates $328,026 from the general fund to the judicial department for use by courts administration. To implement this act, the department may use this appropriation as follows: $246,076 for general courts administration; $75,000 for information technology infrastructure; and $6,950 for capital outlay. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2023 EFFECTIVE June 6, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/27/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
2/14/2023 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/10/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/10/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/12/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/13/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/17/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/25/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/28/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/28/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/5/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/6/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/6/2023 Signed by Governor
6/6/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1124Support Funding For Services For Colorado Employment First Participants M. Lindsay (D) / R. Fields (D)  The bill requires the general assembly to annually appropriate $1.5 million from the general fund to the department of human services for continued employment support and job retention services and to continue to support work-based learning opportunities for Colorado employment first participants.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/30/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
2/8/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/11/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1142Monitor Information Of Person Reporting Child Abuse R. Pugliese (R) / B. Kirkmeyer (R)  Current law requires reports of known or suspected child abuse or neglect to include the source of the report and the name, address, and occupation of the person making the report whenever possible. The bill requires a report of this information in all circumstances. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/31/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
3/14/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/17/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/3/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over to 07/01/2023 - No Amendments

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1160Monitor Colorado TRAILS System Requirements G. Evans (R)  Before adding a person suspected of child abuse or neglect (person) to the automated child welfare system (system), the bill requires the department of human services (state department) to provide a written notice to the person of the opportunity for a hearing. The person must request a hearing no later than 90 days after the date of the written notice. The bill prohibits the state department from releasing a finding of a person responsible for child abuse or neglect or the state department or a law enforcement entity from releasing information about the person or the allegations against the person to a third party until all administrative appeals are either exhausted or waived. When a hearing is requested, the bill requires an administrative law judge (ALJ) to contact the parties to schedule the hearing no later than 120 days after the date the person requests a hearing. If the ALJ finds that there is sufficient evidence to support the state department's allegations, the bill requires: The state department to enter the substantiated findings against the person into the system for a period of time proportionate to the severity of the findings; and Any law enforcement entity that created a record of the alleged incident of child abuse or neglect to retain the record pursuant to certain restrictions. If the ALJ finds there is insufficient evidence to support the state department's allegations, the bill requires: The ALJ to order the state department to amend the state department's findings accordingly and order that allegation not be entered into the system; and Any law enforcement entity that created a record of the alleged incident of child abuse or neglect to mark the record as unsubstantiated and retain and release the record pursuant to certain restrictions. The bill prohibits a finding from being entered against a person who is less than 13 years of age. The bill authorizes the state department, county departments of human and social services (county departments), and law enforcement entities to retain information concerning unsubstantiated reports of child abuse and neglect in casework files to assist in future risk and safety assessments; except that the state department, county departments, and law enforcement entities shall not release any information contained in any records that are accessible to the public or are used for purposes of employment or background checks in cases determined to be unsubstantiated or false. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/1/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
2/21/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Witness Testimony and/or Committee Discussion Only
3/14/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/11/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1165Support County Authority To Prohibit Firearms Discharge J. Amabile (D) | K. McCormick (D) / S. Jaquez Lewis (D)  Under existing law, a board of county commissioners (board) may designate unincorporated areas of a county where it is unlawful to discharge firearms (designated area) , except the board may not prohibit discharge of firearms in shooting galleries, on private grounds, or in residences under circumstances that do not endanger persons or property. A designated area must have an average population density of 100 persons or more per square mile. The bill repeals the exception for private property, repeals the minimum population density requirement, and instead requires that the designated area have 30 35 dwellings or more per square mile. A board is not allowed to prohibit discharge of a firearm in a designated area by a peace officer, in an indoor shooting gallery located in a private residence, or at a shooting range , pursuant to a wildlife management activity, or by a person engaged in a lawful hunting activity or livestock management. Under existing law, certain state laws concerning the state's liability for damages done to property by wild animals protected by the game laws of the state do not apply to a designated area. The bill repeals this exception. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  2/2/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
2/8/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
2/13/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily with Amendments - Committee, Floor
2/14/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
2/15/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/16/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/6/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
5/4/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1172 Child Welfare And Juvenile Court Jurisdiction J. Parenti (D) / S. Jaquez Lewis (D) The act provides juvenile courts jurisdiction to enter permanent allocations of parental responsibilities, without requiring a full court determination of a child as dependent or neglected as to each parent, in certain circumstances. Juvenile courts are granted concurrent jurisdiction to district and county courts to order name changes for children or youth who appear in dependency and neglect and foster youth in transition cases. The requirement to give public notice of name changes through publication for a child or youth determined by the court to be dependent or neglected or subject to a continued dependency or neglect case is eliminated. APPROVED by Governor April 12, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/6/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
2/22/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
2/27/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
2/28/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/2/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
3/13/2023 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/16/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/17/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/31/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/3/2023 Sent to the Governor
4/3/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/12/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1184Support Low-income Housing Property Tax Exemptions W. Lindstedt (D) | L. Frizell (R) / D. Roberts (D) Section 2 of the act clarifies and expands the current property tax exemption for property acquired by nonprofit housing providers for low-income housing. Section 2 also clarifies that property may qualify for the property tax exemption, through construction on the property, until the property is sold or transferred. The act expands the definition of "low-income" applicants to include individuals or families who are at or below 100% of the area median income or, if the property is in a rural resort community, at or below 120% of the area median income, as well as individuals or families who are at or below 80% of the area median income and were already included in the definition. Section 1 of the act requires applicants for the exemption described in section 2 of the act to follow the same process and submit the same forms that are required for applicants for similar exemptions. Section 3 deems certain property held by community land trusts and nonprofit affordable homeownership developers to be used for a strictly charitable purpose and to consequently be exempt from property taxation in accordance with the state constitution. To qualify for the exemption, the property must be split into a separate taxable parcel from the improvements on the property and leased to the owner of the improvements as an affordable homeownership property. APPROVED by Governor May 25, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/8/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
2/28/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Finance
3/6/2023 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/30/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/3/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/10/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/11/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/12/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/25/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/28/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/28/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/25/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1190Support Affordable Housing Right Of First Refusal A. Boesenecker (D) | E. Sirota (D) / F. Winter (D) | S. Jaquez Lewis (D) The act creates a right of first refusal of a local government to match an acceptable offer for the sale of a multifamily residential or mixed-use rental property consisting of 15 or more units in an urban county or 5 or more units in a rural or rural resort county (property). The right to the purchase of the property by the local government is effective on and after August 7, 2023 until August 1, 2028, is subject to the local government's commitment to using the property as long-term affordable housing, and, if the property is mixed-use, applies only to the residential portion of the property. The local government may assign its right of first refusal to a housing authority that is within the local government's jurisdiction, to a regional housing authority, or to the Colorado housing and finance authority subject to the limitation that the assignee make the same commitment to using the property as long-term affordable housing. The act requires notices to be given by the seller to the local government and by the local government to the seller and to residents of the property. Upon receiving notice of intent to sell or of a potential sale of property, the local government has 7 calendar days to preserve its right of first refusal and an additional 30 calendar days to make an offer and must agree to close on the property within 60 calendar days if practicable but within not more than 90 calendar days of the execution of an agreement for the sale and purchase of the qualifying property; except that there are certain circumstances that may allow these periods to be tolled. Prior to the sale of a property, the seller is required to execute and record an affidavit in the real property records of the county in which the property is located certifying that either the rights and property interests of the local government have expired or been released or waived or that the local government or its assignee is the purchaser of the property. The act allows certain sales of property to be exempt from the right of first refusal and the requirements established by the act for the right of first refusal. The act also allows the local government to waive its right of first refusal to purchase a property if the local government elects to disclaim its rights to any proposed transaction or for any duration of time or if there is a third-party buyer interested in purchasing the property with the same commitment to preserving or converting the property for long-term affordable housing that enters into an agreement with the local government concerning the third-party buyer's commitment to long-term affordable housing. If the local government, its assignee, or a third-party buyer who has committed to preserving or converting the property for long-term affordable housing has acquired the property and maintained the property for long-term affordable housing for 50 years, the property may be converted to another use if the following conditions are met: Notice is given to residents prior to the conversion; Any displaced residents are provided with compensation for relocation; and The local government, its assignee, or a third-party buyer who has committed to preserving or converting the property for long-term affordable housing guarantees the development or conversion of an equal or greater amount of units within the boundaries of the local government for long-term affordable housing and offers the units first to any residents displaced by the conversion of the property. The act also provides that the attorney general's office has responsibility to enforce the provisions of the act and that the attorney general's office, the local government, or a mission-driven organization has standing to bring a civil action for violations of the right of first refusal established by the act. If a court finds that a seller or a third-party buyer that has entered into an agreement with the local government for the waiver of the local government's right of first refusal has materially violated the law with respect to the provisions of the right of first refusal, the court must award a statutory penalty of not less than $50,000 or an amount equal to 30% of the purchase or listing price of the property, whichever amount is greater. VETOED by Governor June 6, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/10/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
2/28/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/3/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/6/2023 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
3/7/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/9/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/4/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/10/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/12/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/17/2023 - No Amendments
4/21/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/24/2023 - No Amendments
4/25/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 05/01/2023 - No Amendments
5/1/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/6/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/7/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/8/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/6/2023 Vetoed by Governor
6/6/2023 Governor Vetoed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1194Support Closed Landfills Remediation Local Governments Grants B. McLachlan (D) | R. Pugliese (R) / C. Simpson (R) | J. Ginal (D) The act creates the closed landfill remediation grant program (grant program) to help eligible local governments pay the costs of environmental remediation efforts and landfill management. On and after July 1, 2024, the department of public health and environment (department) is required to administer the grant program in accordance with rules promulgated by the solid and hazardous waste commission (commission) in the department. The department, in consultation with a 5-person advisory committee created in the act, may award grants from money in the closed landfill remediation grant program fund (fund), which fund is also created in the act. On or before February 1, 2026, and on or before each February 1 every 3 years thereafter, the commission must evaluate the current and future financial needs of the grant program and make written recommendations to the general assembly regarding funding. Additionally, the department must prepare and post on its public website an annual report that summarizes the use of all grant money awarded under the grant program in the preceding fiscal year. The grant program is repealed, effective September 1, 2033, subject to a sunset review by the department of regulatory agencies. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $15,000,000 from the general fund to the fund for use by the department. Of this amount, $170,702 is reappropriated to the department for the solid waste control program. Of this reappropriated amount, $87,976 is appropriated to the department of law to pay for legal services provided to the department. APPROVED by Governor May 19, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/13/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
3/29/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/14/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/17/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/17/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/3/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/4/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/5/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/5/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Appropriations
5/6/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/6/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/12/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/15/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/15/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/19/2023 Signed by Governor
5/19/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1202 Overdose Prevention Center Authorization E. Epps (D) | J. Willford (D) / K. Priola (D) | J. Gonzales (D)  The bill specifies that a city may authorize the operation of an overdose prevention center within the city's jurisdiction for the purpose of saving the lives of persons at risk of preventable overdoses. (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  2/15/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
3/1/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
3/6/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/9/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/10/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
3/11/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/12/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/20/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed
4/20/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Witness Testimony and/or Committee Discussion Only
4/26/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1222Monitor Cases Of Domestic Violence In Municipal Court M. Duran (D) | M. Weissman (D) / D. Roberts (D) | F. Winter (D) Beginning January 1, 2024, the act requires a municipality that has a municipal ordinance that criminalizes an act of domestic violence to adopt an ordinance establishing: Protections and rights for victims, victims' families, and witnesses; sentencing guidelines; conditions of probation; conditions of release on bond; and guidelines and standards that are consistent with similar provisions for prosecuting an act of domestic violence in district court; and A requirement that the prosecuting attorney who initially meets with the victim after the charges are filed makes a reasonable effort to remain as the prosecuting attorney throughout the proceeding. In a case involving an alleged violation of a municipal ordinance that criminalizes an act of domestic violence, the act requires a municipal court to issue a protection order; report or cause to be reported the alleged violation to the Colorado bureau of investigation (CBI) and enter the information into the Colorado crime information center (CCIC) database and the national crime information center (NCIC) database; and search the CBI, CCIC database, and the NCIC database to determine if the respondent has a history of domestic violence. The act states that any case involving an alleged violation of a municipal ordinance that criminalizes an act of domestic violence is a misdemeanor for the purposes of complying with federal law. The act authorizes any affected person to enforce compliance with the act by notifying the crime victim services advisory board of any noncompliance. If the board determines that the report of noncompliance has a basis in fact and cannot be resolved, the act requires the board to refer the report to the governor, who shall request that the attorney general file suit to enforce compliance. Beginning January 2025 and each year thereafter until January 2029, the act requires the department of public safety to report during the department's "SMART Act" hearing the total number of reports and inquiries submitted to CBI, the CCIC database, and the NCIC database. APPROVED by Governor May 25, 2023 EFFECTIVE January 1, 2024 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/1/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
4/18/2023 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/20/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/21/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
5/2/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/2/2023 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/12/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/15/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/15/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/25/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1232Support Extend Housing Toolkit Time Frame J. McCluskie (D) | I. Jodeh (D) / D. Roberts (D) Sections 1 and 4 of the act clarify that money that was transferred from the general fund or the affordable housing and home ownership cash fund to the Colorado heritage communities fund on June 27, 2021, or as soon as was practicable thereafter, must be expended before July 1, 2025. Section 2 clarifies that money that was transferred from the general fund to the housing development grant fund on June 27, 2021, must be expended before July 1, 2025. Section 3 clarifies that the division of housing may award multiple grants to multiple grant recipients for multiple regional navigation campuses in the Denver metropolitan area to respond to and prevent homelessness. APPROVED by Governor May 17, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 17, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/7/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
3/15/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
3/17/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
3/20/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/22/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/13/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/18/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
4/19/2023 Senate Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/20/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/21/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/26/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/4/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/5/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/5/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1233Monitor Electric Vehicle Charging And Parking Requirements T. Mauro (D) | A. Valdez (D) / K. Priola (D) | F. Winter (D) Section 2 of the act requires the state electrical board (board) to adopt rules requiring compliance, starting March 1, 2024, with the provisions of the model electric ready and solar ready code that require multifamily buildings to comply with the electric vehicle (EV) power transfer infrastructure requirements. The board is precluded from adopting rules that prohibit the installation or use of EV charging stations unless the rules address a bona fide safety concern. Sections 3 and 4 expand the prohibition against a landlord of rental property or a management association (association) of a common interest community from unreasonably prohibiting the installation of EV charging equipment in the leased premises or a unit in the common interest community (unit) to also apply to an assigned or a deeded parking space for the leased premises or unit, to parking spaces accessible to both the tenant or unit owner and other tenants or unit owners, and to commercial rental property.A landlord or association must also allow an EV or a plug-in hybrid vehicle to park on the premises. Colorado law grants a local government the ability to regulate parking, and this regulation includes requiring that buildings meet minimum parking standards. Sections 5, 6, and 7 require a local government, when counting minimum parking spaces, to count: Any parking space that is served by an EV charging station as at least one standard automobile parking space; and Any van-accessible parking space that is wheelchair accessible and served by an EV charging station as at least 2 standard automobile parking spaces. Sections 8 and 9 prohibit local governments from adopting an ordinance or a resolution that prohibits the installation or use of EV charging stations or restricts parking based on a vehicle being a plug-in hybrid vehicle or plug-in electric vehicle unless the ordinance or resolution addresses a bona fide safety concern. The decision is subject to judicial review. Sections 10 and 11 give local governments that have electrical, elevator and escalator, and plumbing codes adopted by reference to state codes the option to not adopt certain energy efficiency codes when their electrical, elevator and escalator, and plumbing codes are automatically updated because the state has updated these codes. Section 12 exempts, until 2030, EV charging systems from the levy and collection of property tax. Federal law prohibits the construction of automotive service stations or other commercial establishments for serving motor vehicle users along interstate highway rights-of-way, including rest areas. Due to this prohibition, the state cannot construct EV charging systems along interstate highway rights-of-way, including rest areas, in the state. Section 13 specifies that, when the federal law no longer prohibits the construction of EV charging systems along interstate highway rights-of-way, the department of transportation may collaborate with public or private entities to develop projects for the construction of EV charging systems along interstate highway rights-of-way. In addition, the department of transportation may develop these types of projects along state highways. Section 14 defines the phrase "disproportionately impacted community" for state government to include communities in which: The proportion of households that are below 200% of the federal poverty level is greater than 40%; The proportion of households that spend more than 30% of household income on housing is greater than 50%; The proportion of the population that identifies as people of color is greater than 40%; The proportion of the population that is linguistically isolated is greater than 20%; The population has a history of being subject to environmental racism perpetuated through redlining or through anti-indigenous, anti-immigrant, anti-Latino, or anti-Black laws, policies, or practices and that present-day demographic factors and data demonstrate that the community currently faces environmental health disparities; The community is identified by a statewide agency as being one where multiple factors, including socioeconomic stressors, vulnerable populations, disproportionate environmental burdens, vulnerability to environmental degradation or climate change, and lack of public participation, may act cumulatively to affect health and the environment and may contribute to persistent disparities; The community is a mobile home park; or The community is located on the Southern Ute or Ute Mountain Ute Indian reservation. All statewide agencies are required to use the definition of disproportionately impacted community, but the agencies are given flexibility in applying the definition. APPROVED by Governor May 23, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 23, 2023(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/8/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment
3/29/2023 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/3/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/10/2023 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/10/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - No Amendments
4/11/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/14/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
4/19/2023 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/21/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 04/24/2023 - No Amendments
4/24/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/28/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/1/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/2/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/3/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
5/4/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/23/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1236Amend Implementation Updates To Behavioral Health Administration M. Young (D) | J. Amabile (D) / C. Kolker (D) | C. Simpson (R) The act transfers certain administrative responsibilities from: The behavioral health administration (BHA) to the department of human services (department); The office of behavioral health (OBH) to the department; OBH to the BHA; and The department to the BHA. The act repeals OBH as an office in the department. The act requires the chief information officer of the office of information technology to invite the commissioner of the BHA to select a member to represent the BHA on the government data advisory board. The act adds the commissioner of the BHA to the health equity commission. The act states that the BHA is a health oversight agency charged with overseeing the behavioral health-care system in Colorado and discharging the BHA's duties. The act authorizes the BHA to seek, accept, and expend gifts, grants, or donations for the purpose of administering any behavioral health program and service. The act requires a behavioral health safety net provider to include services that address the necessary language and cultural barriers to serve communities of color and other underserved populations. Current law requires the department of public health and environment to continue issuing and renewing behavioral health entity licenses until June 30, 2023. The act extends the date to December 31, 2023. The act requires the statewide behavioral health safety net system to include services for adults who have a serious mental illness and children and youth who have a serious emotional disturbance. The act authorizes the BHA to revoke or refuse to renew a behavioral health entity's license if the owner, manager, or administrator of the entity has been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor involving conduct that the BHA determines could pose a risk to the health, safety, or welfare of the entity's consumers. The act requires the BHA to include in the contract for designated behavioral health administrative services organizations (BHASO) a requirement that the BHASO perform appropriate fiscal management and quality oversight of providers in its network. Current law requires the BHA to create one regional subcommittee of the advisory council for each behavioral health administrative services organization region. The act requires the BHA to create a regional subcommittee structure as part of the BHASO to promote local community input pertaining to behavioral health service needs. The act adds certain members to the regional subcommittee. The act requires the BHA to serve as the central organizing structure and responsible entity for jail-based behavioral health services. Current law requires the commissioner to select and contract with regionally based behavioral health organizations to establish, administer, and maintain adequate networks of behavioral health safety net services and care coordination no later than July 1, 2024. The act extends the date to July 1, 2025. For state fiscal year 2023-24, the act requires the BHA to safeguard partnerships between community-based behavioral health providers and rural hospitals by allocating money to community-based behavioral health providers. To implement the care navigation program, the act requires the BHA to provide, directly or through contract, care navigation services and align the care navigation services with the care coordination infrastructure. The act continuously appropriates money to the 988 crisis hotline cash fund. Current law specifies the rights of a person detained by a certified peace officer or emergency medical services provider and transported to an outpatient mental health facility or facility designated by the commissioner of the BHA. The act expands the rights to any person detained whether or not the person is transported to an outpatient mental health facility or facility designated by the commissioner of the BHA. If a person detained is transported to an emergency medical services facility, the transportation hold expires upon the facility receiving the person for screening by an intervening professional. Current law states the BHA is responsible for licensing mental health residential facilities on and after July 1, 2023. The act extends the date to October 1, 2023. The act extends the date that behavioral health entities can legally operate without a license from July 1, 2024, to January 1, 2024. The act decreases the general fund appropriation for use by the BHA and increases the general fund appropriation for use by the OBH for jail-based behavioral health services by $2,250,400. APPROVED by Governor May 16, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 16, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/8/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
3/28/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
3/31/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/10/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/11/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/12/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/26/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/1/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/2/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/2/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/2/2023 Senate Third Reading Reconsidered - No Amendments
5/4/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/11/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/12/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/12/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/16/2023 Signed by Governor
5/16/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1244Monitor Regional Health Connector Program C. deGruy Kennedy (D) | E. Velasco (D) / K. Priola (D) The act moves the regional health connector program (program) from the university of Colorado school of medicine to the prevention services division (division) in the department of public health and environment (department). The act requires the division to administer the program and requires the department to contract with a third-party entity to coordinate and oversee the program. The contracted entity is required to distribute money to each locally based host organization, which hires and supports a regional health connector to engage in program activities. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $1.5 million to the department of higher education for use by the regents of the university of Colorado for allocation to the school of medicine and $71,903 to the department for use by the division for the program. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act annually appropriates $1.5 million to the division for the program. APPROVED by Governor June 7, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/13/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
3/28/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/14/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/14/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/15/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/17/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/26/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/1/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/1/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/2/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
5/4/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/22/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/22/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/22/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/7/2023 Signed by Governor
6/7/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1249Oppose Reduce Justice-involvement For Young Children R. Armagost (R) | S. Gonzales-Gutierrez / C. Simpson (R) | J. Coleman (D) The act requires that the department of human services (department) add to its report information on the number of youth who at the time they received services from the county department of human or social services (county department) or were placed in out-of-home placement by a county department had an open delinquency case in a district court, were on juvenile probation, or had a juvenile deferred sentence. The act repeals the requirement to created performance measures for local collaborative management programs. The act requires a local collaborative management program to create one or more individualized service and support teams which may refer a child to services and establish a service and support plan for a child in need of services. The act requires the department to create an information form to be used by certain agencies and individuals to refer a child to a local collaborative management program for services. The act delineates who has access to the records created by an individualized service and support team. The act requires the department to include strategies for children who would benefit from integrated multi-agency services in its training for counties participating in a local collaborative management program. The act requires each interagency oversight group to add to its report to the executive director of each department and agency that is a party to a memorandum of understanding certain demographic, status, and referral information on children and families served and referred to services through a local collaborative management program. On July 1, 2023 and annually thereafter, the act requires the general assembly to appropriate money to the collaborative management cash fund (fund) to serve children who would benefit from integrated multi-agency services. Beginning July 1, 2024, the act requires the executive director of the department to provide an annual sum to each local collaborative management program to provide services to children who would benefit from integrated multi-agency services based on a funding formula that takes into account the amount of available funds, the need for a base of resources to direct a child and family members to appropriate services, and the number of children in the population to be served. On or before July 1, 2024, a local collaborative management program nd each July 1 thereafter, the act requires the district attorney of each judicial district to submit a report to the house of representatives judiciary committee and the senate judiciary committee that includes information on children who are offered an opportunity to participate in a diversion program. The act appropriates $2,257,411 from the general fund to the department for use by the division of child welfare. From this appropriation, $257,411 must be used for collaborative management program administration and evaluation and $2,000,000 must be used to assist interested counties that do not already operate a local collaborative management program with establishing a local collaborative management program or joining an existing local collaborative management program. The act further appropriates $1,165,039 from the general fund to the fund for use by the division of child welfare for distribution to existing local collaborative management programs. APPROVED by Governor June 1, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/20/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
4/5/2023 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/14/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/15/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/17/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
4/26/2023 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/28/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/1/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily with Amendments - Floor
5/2/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over with Amendments to 05/02/2023 - Floor
5/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily with Amendments - Floor
5/6/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/8/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/1/2023 Signed by Governor
6/1/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1253 Task Force To Study Corporate Housing Ownership S. Sharbini | M. Lindsay (D) / N. Hinrichsen (D) The act creates the task force on corporate housing ownership (task force) in the state demography office in the department of local affairs and directs the task force to: Examine housing ownership by corporate entities and residential real estate transactions by corporate entities in Colorado since January 1, 2008, including purchases resulting from foreclosures; Determine a methodology by which to examine the impacts of corporate acquisition and ownership of residential property, with a focus on single-family homes, condominiums, and townhomes; Gather and analyze data, reports, and public records related to corporate ownership of housing; Make legislative recommendations to mitigate any negative impacts related to corporate ownership of housing that are identified by the task force; and Report to specified legislative committees certain information concerning the impacts of corporate ownership of housing. The task force must report its findings to the transportation, housing, and local government committee of the house of representatives and the local government and housing committee of the senate, or to any successor committees, by October 1, 2025. The task force is repealed, effective September 1, 2027. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the act appropriates from the general fund: $122,549 to the department of local affairs for use by the state demography office; and $1,416 to the legislative department for use by the general assembly. APPROVED by Governor June 7, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/20/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/5/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/25/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/27/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/1/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/2/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/2/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
5/4/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/5/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/5/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/6/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/7/2023 Signed by Governor
6/7/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1255Monitor Regulating Local Housing Growth Restrictions W. Lindstedt (D) | R. Dickson / J. Gonzales (D) The act preempts any existing local governmental entity housing growth restriction that explicitly limits either the growth of the population in the local governmental entity's jurisdiction or the number of development permits or building permit applications for residential development or the residential component of any mixed use development submitted to, reviewed by, approved by, or issued by a governmental entity for any calendar or fiscal year and forbids the enactment or enforcement of any such future local housing growth restriction unless the governmental entity has experienced a disaster emergency, has developed or amended land use plans or land use laws covering residential development or the residential component of a mixed-use development, or is extending or acquiring public infrastructure, public services, or water resources. A governmental entity that experiences one of these events may implement a growth cap for up to 24 months in a 5-year period. APPROVED by Governor June 7, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/24/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/5/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/11/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/21/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/24/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
5/2/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/4/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/5/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
5/7/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/11/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/12/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/12/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
6/7/2023 Signed by Governor
6/7/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1257 Mobile Home Park Water Quality E. Velasco (D) | A. Boesenecker (D) / L. Cutter (D) | K. Priola (D) The act creates a water testing program for mobile home parks (parks). The testing program is developed and administered by the water quality control division (division) in the department of public health and environment (department). The act also sets testing prioritization criteria and testing standards. Within 10 days after receiving test results, the division will notify the following of the test results and, if the testing reveals a water quality issue, include information about the availability of the complete test results, any violation of water quality standards, recommended actions, remediation, and the grant program established in the act: The park owner; The county department of health where the park is located; The municipality where the park is located, if any; The division of housing in the department of local affairs; The water supplier; and The environmental justice ombudsperson (ombudsperson). Upon receiving the notice, the park owner must: Notify the park residents within 5 days in the language chosen by the residents; Comply with orders of the division; and Not impose the cost of compliance on park residents. Within 120 days after receiving the notice, the park owner must prepare and submit to the division a remediation plan. The park owner must complete the remediation plan based on a schedule approved by the division, consult with the division, and provide a reasonable and sufficient amount of accessible drinking water or department-approved filters to park residents if necessary to address acute health risks. The division will coordinate with the division of housing in the department of local affairs to identify potential money, including grant money from the grant program created in the act, to support park water quality remediation. The division will develop an action plan to address and improve water quality in parks. Standards are established for the action plan and the development of the action plan. The act creates a grant program to help park owners, nonprofit entities, and local governments address water quality issues in parks. Standards are set for obtaining and spending grants. The division will implement and administer the grant program. The general assembly will annually appropriate money to the department to fund the grant program. The act is enforced by the attorney general and the division, which may issue cease-and-desist orders. The attorney general may request a temporary restraining order, preliminary injunction, permanent injunction, or any other relief necessary to protect the public health, water quality, or environment. The act establishes that: The division may impose a civil penalty of up to $10,000 plus an additional $5,000 per full calendar month the violation continues; A park owner that fails to register under the "Mobile Home Park Act Dispute Resolution and Enforcement Program" violates the "Colorado Consumer Protection Act"; Retaliation against a tenant for making a complaint is prohibited; and A person may bring a civil action under the "Mobile Home Park Act". Civil penalties are deposited in the mobile home park water quality fund to be used to provide grants through the grant program and for the division to administer and enforce the act. The ombudsperson is given the duty to represent park residents in matters of water quality. The act adds water quality issues to the database created by the "Mobile Home Park Act Dispute Resolution and Enforcement Program", which tracks complaints filed against parks. To implement the act, $3,611,859 is appropriated from the general fund to the mobile home park water quality fund, of which $3,407,448 is reappropriated to the department for administration, personal services, and the purchase of legal services, and $136,885 is appropriated from the general fund to the mobile home park act dispute resolution and enforcement program fund for use by the department of local affairs. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2023 EFFECTIVE June 5, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/26/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/12/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Finance
4/17/2023 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/25/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/26/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/27/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/29/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
5/4/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/5/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/5/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/6/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/22/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/22/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/22/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/5/2023 Signed by Governor
6/5/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1259 Open Meetings Law Executive Session Violations L. Daugherty (D) | G. Evans (R) / R. Zenzinger (D) | C. Simpson (R) Under current law, if the court finds a violation of the open meetings law, a prevailing citizen is entitled to costs and reasonable attorney fees. The act specifies that for certain challenges by a pro se plaintiff that are brought in connection with provisions in the open meetings law governing executive sessions in the open meetings law the pro se plaintiff is not entitled to an award of costs or attorney fees. VETOED by Governor June 6, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/26/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs
4/10/2023 House Committee on State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/12/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/13/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/14/2023 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
4/24/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
4/27/2023 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/1/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/2/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
5/4/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/6/2023 Vetoed by Governor
6/6/2023 Governor Vetoed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1269Support Extended Stay And Boarding Patients D. Michaelson Jenet (D) | S. Gonzales-Gutierrez / J. Bridges (D) | B. Gardner (R) The act requires the department of health care policy and financing to analyze how directed payment authority can be used as part of a comprehensive plan to facilitate an adequate network of services for children and youth by requiring each managed care entity to pay no less than state department-established fee schedule rates for services needed to promote clinical stabilization. The act creates the high-acuity treatment and services cash fund (cash fund). The act authorizes the department of human services (CDHS) to retain any unspent money appropriated in fiscal year 2022-23 and 2023-24 from the general fund for counties during the initial allocations for the administration of child welfare services, core services, or child welfare staffing. On June 30, 2023, and June 30, 2024, the act requires the state treasurer to transfer any money retained to the cash fund. The act requires CDHS to expend money from the cash fund to provide additional resources to licensed providers to help remove barriers that providers face in serving children and youth whose behavioral or mental health needs require services and treatment that exceed capacity of the established daily rates. The cash fund repeals July 1, 2025. No later than July 1, 2023, the act requires CDHS to form a working group to make recommendations about developing an incentive funding pool pilot program to incentivize residential treatment providers to accept and treat children and youth who have high-acuity behavioral health needs to appropriate treatment and placement. The act requires the behavioral health administration (BHA) to consult with a working group to help develop the performance monitoring system framework that addresses the minimum performance standards for treatment of children and youth, which must include measures of accountability for children and youth who are boarding or in extended stay . Beginning September 1, 2023, and each quarter thereafter until October 1, 2024, the act requires each hospital to report information to the BHA on the total number of children and youth patients who were boarding or had extended stay in the previous quarter; if known, how many children and youth who were boarding or had extended stay and were in county custody at the time; and, for patients who were discharged during the quarter, where the patients were discharged to. Beginning September 1, 2023, and each quarter thereafter until October 1, 2024, the act requires CDHS to report information to the BHA on the total number of children and youth in the custody of, or who had involvement with, a county department of human or social services who spent time at least overnight in a hotel or a county department office as a stopgap setting. No later than September 1, 2023, and each quarter thereafter until October 1, 2024, the act requires the BHA to report aggregated and de-identified information submitted to the BHA to the working group. The act requires CDHS to develop a capacity plan for whenever a residential treatment facility for children and youth closes or has a substantial change in operation. The act appropriates $5,900,000 from the cash fund to CDHS for use by the division of child welfare for high-acuity treatment services. Any money remaining from the appropriation prior to July 1, 2024, is further appropriated to CDHS for fiscal year 2024-25. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2023 EFFECTIVE June 5, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/29/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
4/11/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/21/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/21/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/24/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
5/3/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/4/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/4/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/5/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/5/2023 Signed by Governor
6/5/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1285 Store Use Of Carryout Bags And Sustainable Products A. Valdez (D) / K. Priola (D) | L. Cutter (D) Currently, a grocery store, supermarket, convenience store, liquor store, dry cleaner, pharmacy, drug store, clothing store, or other type of retail establishment at which carryout bags are traditionally provided to customers (store) is required to collect a fee for each carryout bag the store provides to a customer. The store must remit a portion of that fee to the municipality or county (local government) in which the store is located. When the local government has not established a process to accept the remitted fees, the act requires the store to retain and use the portion of the fee that would otherwise be remitted to a local government: For any recycling, composting, or other waste diversion programs and related outreach and education activities; and To purchase reusable bags. APPROVED by Governor June 1, 2023 EFFECTIVE June 1, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/5/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/13/2023 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/14/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
4/15/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/17/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
5/2/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/4/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/5/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
5/7/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/1/2023 Signed by Governor
6/1/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1287Support County Regulation Related To Short-term Rentals J. McCluskie (D) | M. Lukens (D) / D. Roberts (D) | P. Will (R) A board of county commissioners is currently authorized to license and regulate an owner or owner's agent of a lodging unit that is rented or advertised for short-term stays, and "owner's agent" expressly excludes an internet hospitality service. The act modifies this regulatory authority by clarifying that it applies to lodging units that are available for short-term rentals, which are rentals for less than 30 days, and by excluding a hotel unit from the scope of the authority. The act also changes "internet hospitality service" to "vacation rental service" (service), defines the term, and provides separate authority for a board of county commissioners to regulate a service. This authority, however, is limited to requiring: An owner or owner's agent to include a rental license or permit number, if applicable, in any listing for a lodging unit on the service's website or other digital platform; and The service to remove a listing from the service's website or other digital platform, if properly notified by a county that the owner of the listed lodging unit has had a local short-term rental license or permit suspended or revoked or has been issued a notice of violation or similar legal process for not possessing a valid local short-term rental license or permit or that the county has a prohibition on short-term rentals that applies to the lodging unit. Upon the request of an owner of a hotel unit that is located in a building with one or more lodging units or a vacation rental service on which the hotel unit is listed, a county is required to provide written verification that the hotel unit is exempt from the ordinance because it is not a lodging unit. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/5/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/11/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/14/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/15/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/18/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
5/2/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/4/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/12/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/15/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/15/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
6/5/2023 Signed by Governor
6/5/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1294 Pollution Protection Measures J. Bacon (D) | J. Willford (D) / F. Winter (D) | J. Gonzales (D) Section 2 of the act creates the legislative interim committee on ozone air quality (committee) to study ozone air quality in the state. The committee consists of 6 members of the senate and 6 members of the house of representatives. The committee may meet up to 6 times during the 2023 interim. With respect to an allegation in a complaint or the belief of the division of administration in the department of public health and environment (division) regarding a violation or noncompliance related to air quality laws (violation), section 3 requires the division to: Cause a prompt and diligent investigation into the violation to be made unless the complaint clearly appears to be frivolous, falsified, or trivial or the complainant withdraws the complaint within the investigation time period; Within 30 days after receipt of the complaint, respond to a complainant to outline the steps of the complaint investigation; If the division is acting in response to a complaint, notify the complainant that an investigation has commenced at the time that the division provides notice to the owner or operator of the air pollution source; and Accept and consider all relevant evidence that it receives or acquires when investigating the alleged violation, unless the evidence is, on its face, falsified. If the division determines that a violation has occurred, current law requires the division to issue a compliance order unless the responsible party gives timely notice that the violation occurred during a period of start-up, shutdown, or malfunction. Section 3 removes the exception for periods of start-up, shutdown, or malfunction. Section 3 also prohibits the division from assessing a penalty for a violation that is less than the economic benefit that the owner or operator derived from the violation. Section 3 also requires, if a hearing is requested, the air quality control commission to provide at least 45 days' notice to any complainant that submitted a complaint alleging the applicable violation and allows the complainant to participate as a party to the hearing. Current law provides that any noncompliance that occurs during a period of start-up, shutdown, or malfunction exempts the owner or operator of a source of pollution from the duty to pay penalties related to that noncompliance. Section 3 removes this provision. Current law requires the division to consider certain factors in determining the amount of a civil penalty to assess for a violation. Section 4 requires the division to also consider the severity of the violation. Current law provides that any action related to an alleged violation of air quality laws that is not commenced within 5 years after the occurrence of the alleged violation is time barred. Section 5 excludes actions commenced to address a failure to obtain a permit from this statute of limitation. Section 6 requires the oil and gas conservation commission (COGCC), by April 28, 2024, to promulgate rules that evaluate and address the cumulative impacts of oil and gas operations. The rules must include a definition of cumulative impacts. Section 7 allows any person to submit a complaint to the COGCC. The COGCC or the director of the COGCC is required to promptly commence and complete an investigation into the violation alleged in the complaint, unless the complaint clearly appears on its face to be frivolous, falsified, or trivial or the complainant withdraws the complaint. The COGCC must also accept and consider all relevant evidence it receives or acquires when investigating the violation, unless the evidence is, on its face, falsified. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, section 8 appropriates $79,493 from the general fund to the department of public health and environment for use by the air pollution control division in the following amounts: $71,473 for personal services related to stationary sources; and $8,020 for operating expenses related to stationary sources. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, section 8 also appropriates $820,697 from the oil and gas conservation and environmental response fund to the department of natural resources in the following amounts: $725,531 for use by the COGCC for program costs; and $95,166 for use by the office of the executive director of the department of natural resources, which is reappropriated to the department of law to provide legal services for the department of natural resources. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, section 8 also appropriates $61,616 from the general fund to the legislative department in the following amounts: $26,180 for use by the legislative council; $18,452 for use by the committee on legal services; and $16,984 for use by the general assembly. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2023 EFFECTIVE June 6, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/13/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment
4/20/2023 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/28/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/28/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/29/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/1/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
5/5/2023 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/6/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/6/2023 Senate Second Reading Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/7/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/8/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/22/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/22/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/22/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/6/2023 Vetoed by Governor
6/6/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1300Support Continuous Eligibility Medical Coverage S. Bird (D) | E. Sirota (D) / R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Kirkmeyer (R) The act requires the department of health care policy and financing (state department) to study the feasibility of extending continuous medical coverage for additional children and adults. The state department is required to submit a report detailing its findings and recommendations from the feasibility study to the joint budget committee of the senate and house of representatives, the governor, and to the house of representatives public and behavioral health and human services committee and the senate health and human services committee, or any successor committees, by January 1, 2026, and also make the report publicly available. No later than April 1, 2024, the state department must seek federal authorization to extend continuous eligibility coverage for children under 3 years of age, including children who would be eligible for medical assistance coverage but are not because of their immigration status, and to extend eligibility coverage for 12 months for adults who have been released from a Colorado department of corrections facility, regardless of any change in income during that time. Upon approval of the federal authorization, the state department shall implement continuous eligibility coverage by January 1, 2026. The act appropriates $337,765 from the general fund to the state department for use by the executive director's office (office). From this appropriation the office may use $192,915 for personal services, $20,050 for operating expenses, and $124,800 for general professional services and special projects. The act anticipates that the state department will receive $337,765 in federal funds to implement this act. APPROVED by Governor June 1, 2023 EFFECTIVE June 1, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/19/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Appropriations
4/21/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/21/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/24/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Appropriations
4/28/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/28/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/11/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/12/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/12/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
6/1/2023 Signed by Governor
6/1/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1302 Housing Accessibility D. Ortiz (D) | S. Lieder (D)  The bill modifies the accessible housing standards and specifications exception process for housing for which building plans are submitted to a governmental unit on or after July 1, 2023. A governmental unit may only grant exceptions to any particular accessible housing standard or specification when the governmental unit determines that the standard or specification is technically infeasible and would create an undue hardship. The determination must be in writing and must articulate the relevant undue hardship. Similarly, the bill requires that the alteration of walls or defining boundaries in housing that was under construction prior to July 1, 2023, must comply with certain minimum alteration requirements, unless there is a determination of undue hardship by the relevant governmental unit. However, even if a governmental unit makes a determination of undue hardship, the alterations must still comply with the minimum alteration requirements to the maximum extent feasible. The bill establishes that failure to comply with certain standards for accessible housing constitutes discrimination on the basis of a disability jointly and severally by the owner of the relevant property and any construction professionals who participate in the noncompliant construction or alteration of the relevant property. The bill creates a civil action for an individual with a disability subject to a failure or the attorney general. The bill requires that certain new construction projects and alterations provide a certain number of type B dwelling units or type B multistory dwelling units, and in some cases at least one type A dwelling unit or type A multistory dwelling unit, based on the number of dwelling units in the construction project or alteration. The bill prohibits a landlord from refusing a request by an individual with a disability to make modifications, at the individual's own expense, necessary to afford the individual the full enjoyment of the property. The bill requires newly constructed housing to have: At least one building entrance on an accessible route, unless doing so would be an undue hardship; Fire alarms that are accessible to individuals with a disability, so long as the dwelling unit does not require individuals to purchase their own fire alarms; and Emergency exits that are accessible to individuals with a disability. The bill also states that a failure to ensure the following qualifies as discrimination against an individual with a disability: That all mailboxes assigned to dwelling units are fully accessible to any individual with a disability who lives in those dwelling units; and That all signage in dwelling units, including directories and elevator buttons, is accessible to individuals with disabilities. Lastly, the bill authorizes a court to extend: The answer date in an eviction proceeding if the defendant files a written request with the court for a reasonable accommodation pursuant to prohibited unfair housing practices; and The hearing date for a hearing required during a foreclosure proceeding if the borrower files a written request with the court for a reasonable accommodation pursuant to prohibited unfair housing practices.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  4/19/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/25/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1304Monitor Proposition 123 Affordable Housing Programs J. McCluskie (D) | L. Frizell (R) / D. Roberts (D) | T. Exum (D) The act modifies the affordable housing programs (programs) created by Proposition 123, which was approved by voters at the 2022 statewide election, by: Allowing tribal governments to participate in the programs; Requiring the division of local government, rather than the division of housing, to administer the land planning capacity development program; Allowing the office of economic development (office) to use a portion of the money in the affordable housing financing fund (financing fund) for its administrative expenses, without increasing the total amount of money from the fund that may be used for administrative expenses; Modifying the calculation for determining eligibility for some of the programs; Clarifying the description of how money is transferred or allocated; Specifying certain units to be included for purposes of the 3% growth obligation that is a condition for funding for local and tribal governments; Establishing a process for rural resort communities to petition the division of housing to use alternative percentages of area median income for eligibility for certain affordable housing programs for a given funding cycle; Exempting money that was originally from the federal coronavirus state fiscal recovery fund from the appropriations for fiscal year 2022-23 used to determine the state's maintenance of effort requirement for other affordable housing funding; and Requiring the office and the division of housing to provide 3 annual reports to legislative committees about the affordable housing programs. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2023 EFFECTIVE June 5, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/20/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/25/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/26/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/27/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/29/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
5/2/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/4/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/5/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
5/8/2023 House Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/22/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/22/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/22/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/5/2023 Signed by Governor
6/5/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1307 Juvenile Detention Services And Funding L. Daugherty (D) | M. Soper (R) / C. Simpson (R) | R. Rodriguez (D) The act requires the general assembly to annually appropriate $3,340,119 to the department of human services (department) for services for youth who are detained or can be placed in lieu of detention. Of the money, the department shall: Allocate $200,000 to judicial districts for services for detained youth and supports for youth moving from detention to treatment or other placements; Use $1,780,137 to incentivize and remove barriers for licensed providers to serve youth who may be placed in community residential facilities or family-like settings in lieu of detention; and Use $1,359,982 of the money for temporary emergency detention beds for juveniles. Existing law limits the number of juvenile detention beds available for juveniles statewide, which are allocated to catchment areas. The act establishes 22 temporary emergency detention beds that may be used, pursuant to a court order, when there are no available beds in a judicial district's catchment area. The act establishes the process for a court to order the use of a temporary emergency detention bed. Temporary emergency detention beds do not count toward the statewide juvenile detention bed limit. If a juvenile detention bed within a judicial district's allocation becomes available, the act requires a juvenile utilizing a temporary bed to revert to the nonemergency detention bed. A court is required to appoint, at a juvenile's detention hearing, a guardian ad litem for each detained juvenile. The appointment terminates upon the release of the juvenile from detention unless the court finds a basis for continuing appointment pursuant to other state law. The act requires the working group for criteria for placement of juvenile offenders, known as the CYDC working group, to review data collected by the division of youth services annually rather than every 2 years. The department is required to collect statewide data about: Youth eligible for release from a detention facility without an additional court order if services or placements are available for the youth; The use of temporary emergency detention beds; and Youth released from detention solely because the number of youth detained statewide exceeds the statewide detention bed cap. The act requires the department to annually report the statewide data to the CYDC working group, the house of representatives and senate judiciary committees, the house of representatives public and behavioral health and human services committee, and the senate health and human services committee, or any successor committees. The act requires the CYDC working group to conduct a study to determine the best method to collect and report data and information concerning youth released from detention because a detention bed was unavailable. For fiscal year 2023-24, the act appropriates $3,340,119 from the general fund to the department. The department may use the appropriation as follows: $1,174,816 for use by the division of youth services (DYS) for program administration related to institutional programs; $11,792 for use by DYS for medical services related to institutional programs; $300,816 for use by DYS for certain programs related to community programs; $1,780,137 for use by the division of child welfare for community provider incentives; and $72,558 for use by the division of child welfare for Colorado's statewide automated child welfare information system (TRAILS). The act also appropriates $463,000 from the general fund to the judicial department for use by the office of the child's representative for court-appointed counsel. APPROVED by Governor June 7, 2023 EFFECTIVE June 7, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/21/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
4/25/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/28/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/29/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/1/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/1/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Appropriations
5/3/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/4/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/22/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/22/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/22/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/7/2023 Signed by Governor
6/7/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

HB23-1308 Access To Government By Persons With Disabilities D. Ortiz (D) / J. Danielson (D)  The bill requires state and local public bodies (public bodies), including the general assembly, and political parties to comply with certain accessibility requirements within specified periods. Access to ballot by candidates. The bill requires the general assembly, the secretary of state, and each political party to ensure that the caucus process or any future alternative process by which candidates may access the ballot that is accessible to persons with disabilities remains an option in the state. The bill specifies that the petition process is not a means of ballot access that is accessible to persons with disabilities. In addition, the bill requires that within 6 months of the effective date of the bill, any person, upon request, must be able to participate in a precinct caucus or a party assembly with the use of a video conferencing platform that is accessible to persons with disabilities unless the precinct caucus or party assembly is held in a geographic location that lacks broadband internet service. Auxiliary aids and services for members of the general assembly. The house of representatives and the senate are required to provide auxiliary aids and services to any member of the general assembly upon request of the member for use by the member while the member is in the capitol building or any other building in the capitol complex where legislative business regularly occurs. Video conferencing platforms in court proceedings. Within 5 years of the effective date of the bill, all courts in the state are required to allow a person to appear in court by the use of a video conferencing platform upon request of the person who is required to appear in court; except that the court may make a finding of fact that the person's physical presence in the courtroom is required. The supreme court is required to prescribe rules of procedure to implement the use of a video conferencing platform. The bill includes an exemption for courts that are in a geographic location that lacks broadband internet service. Accessibility of meetings of public bodies. Each public body is required to ensure that the following accessibility requirements are implemented: Within 6 months of the effective date of the bill, any public meeting at which public business is discussed, formal action may be taken, or recommendations to the governing body of the public body may be discussed (meeting) held by a public body is required to be accessible in real time by live streaming video or audio that is recorded and accessible to persons with disabilities; A public body is required to post on its website, within specified periods, any documents that will be distributed during a meeting; Within 6 months of the effective date of the bill, for any meeting of a public body during which public testimony will be heard, the public body is required to allow any person to participate in the meeting and offer public testimony by using a video conferencing platform unless the meeting occurs in a geographic location that lacks broadband internet service; A public body may require that a request for auxiliary aids or services to attend a meeting of the public body with the use of the video conferencing platform be made up to 7 days before the date of the meeting; A public body is required to provide any auxiliary aids or services requested in time for the meeting for which they were requested without an explanation of the need for the auxiliary aids and services. A public body is required to postpone a meeting if it is unable to provide the requested auxiliary aids or services in time for the meeting and is required to document the reason for the additional time required. State capitol building accessibility requirements. Within 4 years of the effective date of the bill, the legislative department, acting through the executive committee of the legislative council, is required to ensure that an audio and way-finding program that allows a person who is blind or visually impaired to independently navigate the state capitol building is implemented and available to any person who works in or visits the capitol building. The failure of any political party or public body to comply with the applicable requirements of the bill constitutes discrimination on the basis of disability. Any person who is subjected to a violation is entitled to seek relief as currently provided in law. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  4/25/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
5/2/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB23-001 Authority Of Public-private Collaboration Unit For Housing D. Roberts (D) | R. Zenzinger (D) / S. Bird (D) | M. Lukens (D) The public-private collaboration unit (unit) in the department of personnel (department) promotes the use of public-private partnerships between state public entities such as departments, agencies, or subdivisions of the executive branch of state government, and private partners as a tool for time and cost-efficient completion of public projects. The act requires that the unit give preference to proposed or executed public-private partnership agreements that will use state-owned real property for mixed-income development and affordable housing that is proportional to a community's demonstrated affordable housing needs and authorizes the unit to undertake additional functions in connection with public projects that provide affordable housing including: Accepting gifts, grants, and donations, which if monetary, are to be credited to the unused state-owned real property fund (fund); Utilizing proceeds from real estate transactions and revenue from public-private agreements; Acting as an agent on behalf of the department in real estate transactions using real property that upon approval by the governor has been deeded to the department by a state public entity, including for the purchase, transfer, exchange, sale and disposition, and lease of real property; and Establishing a process for using requests for information to solicit public projects. The act also allows the department and the unit to use money from the fund to facilitate these additional functions by the unit in connection with public projects that provide affordable housing and for the standard operating expenses of the unit. The state treasurer is required to transfer $5,000,000 from the general fund to the fund on July 1, 2023. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $47,583 to the department of law from the legal services cash fund from revenue received from the department of personnel that is continuously appropriated to the department of personnel from the unused state-owned real property fund. The department of law may use the appropriation to provide legal services for the department of personnel. APPROVED by Governor May 20, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 20, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/9/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
1/24/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/6/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/6/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/10/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/10/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/18/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/25/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/25/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/26/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/27/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/3/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/4/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/4/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/20/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-002 Medicaid Reimbursement For Community Health Services K. Mullica (D) | C. Simpson (R) / J. McCluskie (D) | M. Bradfield (R) The act authorizes the department of health care policy and financing (state department) to seek federal authorization from the centers for medicare and medicaid services to provide medicaid reimbursement for community health worker services. The act requires the state department to hold at least 4 public stakeholder meetings to solicit input on considerations to include in the state department's request for federal authorization. The act grants the state department the authority to promulgate rules regarding the voluntary competency-based community health worker registry. The act requires that on or before January 31, 2026, the state department include a report on how community health workers are being utilized through medicaid in its presentation to the joint budget committee of the general assembly and in its presentation at the "State Measurement for Accountable, Responsive, and Transparent (SMART) Government Act" hearing. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $40,717 from the general fund to the state department to be used by the executive director's office as follows: $36,842 for personal services; and $3,875 for operating expenses. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the act anticipates the state department will receive $40,717 in federal funds to be used as follows: $36,842 for personal services; and $3,875 for operating expenses. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $169,973 to the department of public health and environment to be used by chronic disease prevention programs in the prevention services division for the community health workers initiative. APPROVED by Governor May 10, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/9/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
3/2/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/6/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/6/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/10/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/10/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
4/18/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/21/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/24/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/26/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/4/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/4/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/10/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-016Amend Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Measures C. Hansen (D) / K. McCormick (D) | E. Sirota (D) The length of the bill summary for this bill requires it to be published on a separate page here: https://leg.colorado.gov/sb23-016-bill-summary APPROVED by Governor May 11, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/10/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Transportation & Energy
1/25/2023 Senate Committee on Transportation & Energy Refer Amended to Finance
2/21/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/6/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/11/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/13/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/14/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/17/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment
4/20/2023 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Amended to Finance
4/24/2023 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/26/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/26/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/27/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/29/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
5/4/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Not Concur - Request Conference Committee
5/6/2023 First Conference Committee Result was to Adopt Rerevised w/ Amendments
5/7/2023 First Conference Committee Result was to Adopt Rerevised w/ Amendments
5/8/2023 Senate Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Adopt Committee Report - Repass
5/8/2023 House Consideration of First Conference Committee Report result was to Adopt Committee Report - Repass
5/9/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/10/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/10/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/11/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-039Amend Reduce Child And Incarcerated Parent Separation J. Buckner (D) / J. Amabile (D) The act requires the department of human services to promulgate rules that facilitate communication and family time between children and their parents who are incarcerated. The act requires the court to appoint counsel for a respondent parent who is incarcerated, unless the court determines the respondent is able to financially secure counsel or chooses to proceed without counsel. The act requires the court and the prison or jail where the parent is incarcerated to facilitate the parent's attendance and participation in proceedings for the parent's dependency and neglect case. Under current law, after an order of adjudication in a dependency and neglect case, the court holds a dispositional hearing. The act requires, except in instances when the proposed disposition is termination of the parent-child legal relationship, if a child's parent is incarcerated, that the county department of human services include information in the report that details the services and treatment available to a parent at the facility or jail where the parent is incarcerated. Under current law, the court may terminate the parent-child legal relationship based on statutorily created circumstances. The act eliminates the parent's incarceration and related conditions as a basis for terminating the parent-child relationship. Under current law, if the court finds that there is not a substantial probability that the child will be returned to a parent or legal guardian within 6 months and the child satisfies criteria for adoption, the court may require the county department of human services to show cause why it should not file a motion to terminate the parent-child legal relationship. The act states that such cause may exist if the parent is incarcerated, detained by the United States department of homeland security, or deported and has maintained a meaningful and safe relationship with the child while incarcerated, detained, or deported. If a child's parent is incarcerated and the parent has maintained a meaningful and safe relationship with the child while incarcerated, the court shall make findings regarding whether a permanent placement for the child exists that permits the parent to maintain a relationship with the child, including guardianship or allocation of parental responsibilities, giving primary consideration to the child's mental, physical, and emotional needs. The act requires the department of corrections to: Develop opportunities and promulgate policies to facilitate continued relationships between children and their parents who are incarcerated; Designate a family services coordinator, who is responsible for duties related to children and their parents who are incarcerated; and Create and submit an annual report to the judiciary committees of the senate and house of representatives concerning parents who are incarcerated, and make the report publicly available. The act requires each sheriff to designate one individual responsible for communicating between the jail and county department of human services concerning children subject to an open dependency and neglect case whose parents are incarcerated in the jail. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the act appropriates: $31,110 to the department of corrections from the general fund; $15,111 to the department of human services from the general fund, and assumes the department of human services will receive $4,481 in federal funds; and $7,425 to the judicial department from the general fund for use by the trial courts. APPROVED by Governor May 15, 2023 EFFECTIVE January 1, 2024 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/12/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
2/13/2023 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Appropriations
3/17/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/21/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/23/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
3/24/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
3/26/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
4/5/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/18/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/19/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/20/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/21/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/4/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/5/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/5/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/15/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-042Monitor Tax Lien Sales County Employees J. Rich (R) | C. Kolker (D) / R. Taggart (R)  Current law prohibits a county employee from purchasing a tax lien or property for which a tax lien is sold. The bill narrows the prohibition to apply to a county employee only if the employee participates in the tax lien sales process by preparing, conducting, or executing a sale of lands and town lots. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  1/12/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
2/7/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB23-053 Restrict Governmental Nondisclosure Agreements B. Kirkmeyer (R) | R. Rodriguez (D) / S. Woodrow (D) | G. Evans (R) The act prohibits the state, counties, cities and counties, municipalities, school districts, and any of their departments, institutions, or agencies (public employers) from making it a condition of employment that an applicant for employment or current or past employee (employee) executes a contract or other form of agreement that prohibits, prevents, or otherwise restricts the employee from disclosing factual circumstances concerning the employee's employment with the public employer (nondisclosure agreement) unless the nondisclosure agreement is necessary to prevent disclosure of: The employee's identity, facts that might lead to the discovery of the employee's identity, or factual circumstances relating to the employment that reasonably implicate legitimate privacy interests held by the employee who is a party to the agreement if the employee elects to restrict such disclosure; Data, information, including personal identifying information, or matters that are required to be kept confidential by federal law or regulations, the state constitution, state law, state regulations, state rules, or a court of law or as attorney-client privileged communications, privileged work product, communications related to a threatened or pending legal or administrative action, or materials related to personnel or regulatory investigations by the employer; Information bearing on the specialized details of security arrangements or investigations, including security arrangements for or investigations into elected officials or other individuals, physical infrastructure, or cybersecurity; Information derived from communications of the employer related to threatened or pending legal or administrative action; Discussions that occur in an executive session authorized by the "Colorado Open Meetings Law"; Trade secrets or other confidential or sensitive information provided to or made accessible to the employee by a current or prospective contractor, vendor, or grantee or as part of a public-private partnership or entity working with the state as part of an economic development activity; Trade secrets or information derived from trade secrets or proprietary information of the employer; Information and records not subject to disclosure under the "Colorado Open Records Act" (CORA); or Trade secrets owned by the employer. For a public employer that is the state or a department, institution, or agency of the state, a nondisclosure agreement is also allowed if it is necessary to prevent disclosure of: Nonpublic and confidential labor relations positions and strategies; Attorney work product; Vendor lists and vendor preferences; State business-related information received from a third party that the third party has designated confidential; or Information and matters related to state active duty orders of national guard soldiers and airmen and personnel disputes subject to the jurisdiction of the United States department of defense; For a public employer that is a county, a city and county, a municipality, or a department, institution, or agency of a county, a city and county, or a municipality, a nondisclosure agreement is also allowed if it is necessary to prevent disclosure of: Trade secrets or other confidential or sensitive information provided to or made accessible to the employee by an employer's current or prospective customer, contractor, lessee, lessor, business partner, or affiliate; or Trade secrets or other confidential or sensitive information provided to or made accessible to the employee by a purchaser or seller of property that is engaged in negotiations or under contract with the employer. The act specifies that any provision in any contract or agreement that amounts to a nondisclosure agreement is deemed to be against public policy and unenforceable against an employee of a public employer who is a party to the contract or agreement unless the provision is intended to prevent disclosure of any information or matters for which an exception to the general prohibition against nondisclosure agreements for the public employer applies. The act prohibits a public employer from taking any materially adverse employment-related action, including withdrawal of an offer of employment, discharge, suspension, demotion, or discrimination in the terms, conditions, or privileges of employment, against an employee on the grounds that the employee does not enter into a contract or agreement deemed to be against public policy and unenforceable under the act. The act also states that the taking of a materially adverse employment-related action after an employee has refused to enter into such a contract or agreement is prima facie evidence of retaliation and that any public employer that enforces or attempts to enforce a contract or agreement provision deemed by a court to be against public policy and unenforceable under the act is liable for the employee's reasonable attorney fees and costs in defending against the action. The act requires an action to enforce a provision of the act to be brought in the district court for the district in which the employee is primarily employed. A settlement agreement between an employer that is subject to the act and an employee of the employer must be signed by both the employer and the employee. A nondisclosure agreement must not prohibit the release of information required to be released under CORA. In addition, a nondisclosure agreement executed by a public employer that is the state or a department, institution, or agency of the state and an employee must state that state employees are protected from retaliation for disclosure of information about state agencies that are working outside the public interest. A public employer may require an employee to enter into a nondisclosure agreement with a third party in the employee's official capacity and on behalf of the employer. APPROVED by Governor June 2, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/17/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
2/2/2023 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed
2/2/2023 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Witness Testimony and/or Committee Discussion Only
2/16/2023 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
2/22/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
2/23/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 03/03/2023 - No Amendments
3/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 03/10/2023 - No Amendments
3/10/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 03/17/2023 - No Amendments
3/17/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over to 03/21/2023 - No Amendments
3/23/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
3/24/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/26/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs
4/10/2023 House Committee on State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/12/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/28/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/29/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/1/2023 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/2/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/4/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/5/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/5/2023 Sent to the Governor
6/2/2023 Signed by Governor
6/2/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-057 County Treasurer No Longer Ex Officio District Treasurer J. Rich (R) / R. Taggart (R) County treasurers have been ex officio district treasurers for drainage districts, irrigation districts, and internal improvement districts that provide services related to drainage and ditches (collectively, district). The act removes the duty of the county treasurer to be the ex officio district treasurer and requires district treasurers to be appointed by the board of directors of the district. The act also clarifies that the former duties of the county treasurer as the ex officio district treasurer are now solely duties of the district treasurer. Additionally, the act clarifies that irrigation district assessments and internal improvement district assessments are distributed in alignment with current law for the distribution of assessments collected by county treasurers and updates the amount of fees a county treasurer can charge and receive for collecting drainage and irrigation district assessments to 0.25% upon all money collected by the county treasurer for assessments beginning on and after January 1, 2026. APPROVED by Governor April 3, 2023 EFFECTIVE January 1, 2024 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/17/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
2/14/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
2/21/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
2/22/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/23/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
3/8/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
3/13/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/14/2023 House Second Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/15/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/24/2023 Sent to the Governor
3/24/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
3/24/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/3/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-064Monitor Continue Office Of Public Guardianship B. Gardner (R) | J. Ginal (D) / M. Snyder (D) | R. Armagost (R) Under existing law, the office of public guardianship (office) is authorized to operate in 3 judicial districts and is scheduled to repeal on June 30, 2024. The act extends the office indefinitely and requires the office to begin operating in additional judicial districts in 2025 and to operate in every judicial district in the state by December 31, 2030. The act establishes a board of directors (board) to oversee the office. The board consists of 7 members: 3 members who are attorneys appointed by the chief justice of the Colorado supreme court and 4 non-attorney members appointed by the governor. The existing public guardianship commission that oversees the office is repealed, effective August 31, 2023. The act permits the office to initiate petitions for guardianship and take any action on behalf of a client that a private guardian may take. The act requires the office to prioritize individuals with the greatest needs when the number of cases in which services have been requested exceeds the number of cases in which public guardianship can provide services. The office of administrative services for independent agencies created in the judicial department in Senate Bill 23-228 in 2023 provides administrative and fiscal support to the office of public guardianship. The office is required to employ guardians to provide guardianship services to the office's clients. A guardian must be certified as a guardian or become certified within 2 years after being hired by the office. The office shall provide training to guardians in specified subjects. The act requires a court to waive filing fees for petitions for guardianship filed by the office in cases that involve an indigent and incapacitated person who is eligible for guardianship services from the office. A court is prohibited from requiring the office or a guardian employed by the office to post a bond as a condition for appointment as a guardian. The act authorizes the office to spend any gifts, grants, or donations it receives without prior appropriation by the general assembly. The act requires the state auditor to conduct, or cause to be conducted, a performance audit of the office during the period between July 1, 2027, and June 30, 2030. APPROVED by Governor May 30, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 30, 2023 NOTE: Certain sections of the act are contingent on whether or not Senate Bill 23-228 becomes law. Senate Bill 23-228 was signed by the governor April 20, 2023. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/20/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
2/6/2023 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/21/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/21/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/24/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/24/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
5/2/2023 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended to Appropriations
5/3/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
5/5/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/6/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/10/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/15/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/15/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/30/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-082 Colorado Fostering Success Voucher Program R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Kirkmeyer (R) / J. Amabile (D) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) The act establishes the Colorado fostering success voucher program (program) in the department of human services (DHS). The purpose of the program is to provide housing vouchers and case management services to eligible youth. Case management service agencies are eligible to participate in the program if they are currently participating in a certain type of foster youth program. Eligibility criteria for youth include: Being at least 18 years of age but less than 26 years of age; Having had prior experience in one of several ways with the foster care or kinship care system; Experiencing homelessness or being at imminent risk of homelessness and agreeing to receive case management services; Being a Colorado resident; and Having an income level below that determined by the state department of local affairs (DOLA). DHS and DOLA shall develop a joint administration and implementation plan for the program. Availability, standards, and services for the program are listed in the act. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, $2,674,677 is appropriated from the general fund to the department of human services for use by the division of child welfare. The division may use this appropriation for preventing youth homelessness and implementation of this act. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the general assembly anticipates that the department of human services will receive $22,096 in federal funds for use by the division of child welfare to implement this act. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2023 EFFECTIVE June 5, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/27/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
2/9/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/6/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/6/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/10/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/10/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
4/18/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/21/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/24/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/26/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/3/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/4/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/4/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/5/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-108 Allowing Temporary Reductions In Property Tax Due M. Baisley (R) | F. Winter (D) / R. Pugliese (R) | L. Frizell (R) The act allows a local government to provide temporary property tax relief through temporary property tax credits or mill levy reductions and later eliminate the credits or restore the mill levy. A temporary reduction in property taxes must be annually renewed by the local government. A school district may not temporarily reduce its mill levy below an existing statutory minimum mill levy amount. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/31/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
2/9/2023 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Finance
2/23/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
2/28/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/1/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/14/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/10/2023 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/13/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/6/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/7/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/10/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/15/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/15/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
6/5/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-110Monitor Transparency For Metropolitan Districts J. Marchman (D) | R. Zenzinger (D) / C. Kipp (D) | R. Taggart (R) For a proposed metropolitan district that submits a service plan to one or more boards of county commissioners or one or more governing bodies of a municipality on or after January 1, 2024, the service plan is required to include: The maximum mill levy that may be imposed for the payment of general obligation indebtedness, as determined by the board of county commissioners of each county that is approving the service plan or the governing body of each municipality that is approving the service plan, as applicable; and The maximum debt that may be issued by the metropolitan district, as determined by the board of county commissioners of each county that is approving the service plan or the governing body of each municipality that is approving the service plan, as applicable. In addition to any other meetings held by the board of directors of a metropolitan district (board), beginning in the 2023 calendar year, the board is required to hold an annual meeting if the metropolitan district was organized after January 1, 2000, has residential units within its boundaries, and is not in inactive status. The board is prohibited from taking any official action at the annual meeting and shall ensure that the annual meeting includes a presentation from the metropolitan district regarding the status of public infrastructure projects within the metropolitan district and outstanding bonds, if any, a review of unaudited financial statements showing the year-to-date revenue and expenditures of the metropolitan district in relation to its adopted budget for that calendar year, and an opportunity for members of the public to ask questions about the metropolitan district. In addition, the board is required to provide a public comment period during the separate meeting at which the board adopts the annual budget for the metropolitan district. Prior to issuing debt to a director of a metropolitan district or to an entity with respect to which a director of a metropolitan district must make a disclosure pursuant to current law, the board is required to receive a statement of a registered municipal advisor certifying that specified limits on the maximum interest rate of the debt have been met. On and after January 1, 2024, the seller of residential real property that is located within a metropolitan district is required to provide the purchaser of the property with the official website established by the metropolitan district. The seller is required to provide the information on the Colorado real estate commission approved seller's property disclosure. APPROVED by Governor April 3, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  1/31/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
2/14/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
2/21/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
2/22/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
2/27/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
3/7/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
3/10/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/22/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
3/23/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/24/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
3/24/2023 Sent to the Governor
3/24/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/3/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-143 Retail Delivery Fees S. Fenberg (D) | K. Van Winkle (R) / C. Kipp (D) | M. Soper (R) Currently, the state and several state enterprises impose fees on retail sales of taxable tangible personal property delivered by motor vehicle to a location in the state. These fees are collectively known as the retail delivery fee (RDF), and a retailer who makes a retail delivery is required to add the RDF to the price of the retail delivery, collect it from the purchaser, and pay the RDF revenue to the department of revenue (department), which distributes the revenue to the appropriate cash funds. The department generally administers the RDF in the same manner as the state sales and use tax. The act modifies this administration by permitting a retailer to pay the RDF on behalf of the purchaser. If the retailer elects to pay the RDF, then the retailer is: Not required to add the RDF to the price of the retail delivery, separately itemize the RDF, or collect the RDF from the purchaser, who is not liable or the amount nor eligible for a refund of an erroneously paid RDF; and Required to remit the RDF on the date that would be required if the RDF had been received from the purchaser on the date of the retail delivery. The department is required to waive any processing costs for a retailer's electronic payment by automated clearing house (ACH) debit of the RDF if the charges would exceed the amount of the RDF revenue being remitted. The act creates an exemption from the RDF for a retail delivery by a qualified business, which is a business that has $500,000 or less of retail sales in the prior year or is new, that applies retroactively to when RDFs were first imposed. A purchaser is not eligible for a refund of any RDF that is collected and remitted to the department by a qualified business prior to the effective date of the act. The act also creates a primary definition for "retail delivery" that is cross-referenced in other RDF provisions, and related to this change, a definition of "retail sale" is repealed where the cross reference makes it unnecessary. APPROVED by Governor May 4, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 4, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/8/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
2/21/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
3/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/3/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/6/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/11/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
3/20/2023 House Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/14/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/14/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/15/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/17/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/18/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
4/26/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/27/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/27/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/4/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-147 Regulation Of Kratom T. Sullivan (D) | J. Ginal (D)  Effective July 1, 2024, the bill: Establishes the minimum standards and labeling requirements for kratom products; Requires that, prior to selling or offering for sale any kratom product, the processor of the kratom product (processor) register the kratom product with the department of revenue (department) and provide a certificate of analysis for the kratom product to the department; Requires a processor to notify the department if an adverse event report is submitted to the federal food and drug administration for any of the processor's kratom products; and Allows the department, if there is a reasonable basis, to require a test for compliance of a processor's kratom product by a third-party laboratory, to coordinate with a third-party laboratory to conduct the test, and to require the processor to pay the department's cost for the test. The executive director of the department is required to promulgate rules to administer and enforce the bill and is authorized to impose fines on processors that violate the bill. (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  2/10/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
2/28/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB23-172Support Protecting Opportunities And Workers' Rights Act F. Winter (D) | J. Gonzales (D) / M. Weissman (D) | J. Bacon (D) For purposes of addressing discriminatory or unfair employment practices pursuant to Colorado's anti-discrimination laws, the act enacts the "Protecting Opportunities and Workers' Rights (POWR) Act", which: Directs the Colorado civil rights division (division) to include "harassment" as a basis or description of discrimination on any charge form or charge intake mechanism; Repeals the current definition of "harass" that requires creation of a hostile work environment and redefines "harass" or "harassment" as unwelcome conduct directed at an individual or group of individuals in, or perceived to be in, a protected class, which conduct is subjectively offensive to the individual alleging harassment and objectively offensive to members of the same protected class as the individual alleging harassment, and which conduct need not be severe or pervasive to constitute a discriminatory or an unfair employment practice; Adds protections from discriminatory or unfair employment practices for individuals based on their marital status; For purposes of the exception to otherwise discriminatory practices for an employer that is unable to accommodate an individual with a disability who is otherwise qualified for the job, eliminates the ability for the employer to assert that the individual's disability has a significant impact on the job as a rationale for the employment practice and specifies that the exception is limited to situations in which there is no reasonable accommodation that would allow the individual to satisfy the essential functions of the job; Specifies the requirements for an employer to assert an affirmative defense to an employee's proven claim of unlawful harassment by a supervisor; Specifies the requirements that must be satisfied for a nondisclosure provision in an agreement between an employer and an employee or a prospective employee to be enforceable; and Requires an employer to maintain personnel and employment records for at least 5 years and, with regard to complaints of discriminatory or unfair employment practices, to maintain those records in a designated repository. The act appropriates a total of $1,248,170 from the general fund for the 2023-24 state fiscal year, allocated as follows to the following state departments and offices, to implement the act: $152,866 to the department of corrections; $23,469 to the department of education; $35,415 to the office of the governor; $23,363 to the department of health care policy and financing; $129,081 to the department of human services; $146,894 to the judicial department; $46,833 to the department of labor and employment; $17,708 to the department of law; $76,276 to the department of natural resources; $89,090 to the department of personnel; $52,912 to the department of public health and environment; $52,912 to the department of public safety; $266,298 to the department of regulatory agencies; and $47,045 to the department of revenue. Additionally, $88,008 is appropriated from the state highway fund to the department of transportation to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/27/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary
4/5/2023 Senate Committee on Judiciary Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/14/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/18/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/19/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/20/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
4/20/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary
4/25/2023 House Committee on Judiciary Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/26/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/26/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/27/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/29/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/2/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/9/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/10/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/10/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
6/6/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-175Oppose Financing Of Downtown Development Authority Projects S. Jaquez Lewis (D) | J. Rich (R) / A. Boesenecker (D) | R. Taggart (R) A downtown development authority (authority) may use a tax increment financing (TIF) arrangement to generate capital by dedicating growth in property tax or sales tax revenue for a period of 30 years with the option for one 20-year extension. For property tax revenue only, the act creates the option for additional 20-year extension periods during which an authority may use a TIF arrangement if the governing body of the municipality that created the authority extends the period by ordinance. The first additional 20-year extension period may begin upon the expiration of the original 20-year extension. For the additional 20-year extension periods authorized by the act, 50% of the incremental revenue generated from the TIF arrangement is allocated to a special fund of the municipality that created the authority (special fund) to be used to finance projects within the boundaries of the authority and the other 50% of the incremental revenue is allocated to the other governmental entities that levy property taxes within the boundaries of the authority, unless the municipality and all of the other governmental entities reach an alternative agreement requiring a greater percentage of the incremental revenue to be credited to the special fund. For a 20-year extension period authorized by the act, the base year revenue is recalculated every year. The act allows a municipality and an authority to enter into an intergovernmental agreement through which the municipality may delegate to the board of the authority the power to incur debt and to pledge money in a special fund of the municipality for the payment of the debt. During a 20-year extension period authorized in the act, the authority is under the supervision and control of a board consisting of not less than 9 and not more than 13 members, which is between 4 and 8 additional board members compared to when there is not a 20-year extension period authorized in the act. Of the additional board members, one must be a member of the board of county commissioners of the county in which the authority is located, and one must be a member of the school district board of education of the school district in which the authority is located. The other additional board members are appointed by the governing body of the municipality that created the authority. APPROVED by Governor June 2, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/2/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
3/23/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/28/2023 Senate Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
3/30/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
3/31/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/3/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/17/2023 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/20/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/21/2023 House Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/24/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily
4/26/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/3/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/4/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/4/2023 Sent to the Governor
6/2/2023 Signed by Governor
6/2/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-183Support Local Government Provision Of Communications Services K. Priola (D) | M. Baisley (R) / B. Titone (D) | R. Weinberg (R) The act: Eliminates the requirement that a local government hold an election before providing or before operating a facility to provide cable television, telecommunications, or broadband internet services to subscribers; Eliminates the requirement that a local government hold an election to enter into a private partnership to allow a private provider to use local government facilities in connection with the private provider offering cable television service, telecommunications service, broadband internet service, or middle mile infrastructure; and Specifies that a local government may provide middle mile infrastructure, which is broadband infrastructure that does not connect directly to an end-user location. APPROVED by Governor May 1, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 1, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/9/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
3/23/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/28/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
3/29/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/29/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/12/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/14/2023 House Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/15/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/17/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/18/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/26/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/27/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/27/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/1/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-184Support Protections For Residential Tenants F. Winter (D) | T. Exum (D) / M. Froelich (D) | L. Garcia (D) The act restricts a landlord, with certain exceptions, from considering or inquiring about certain information relating to a prospective tenant's amount of income and credit history. A landlord may not require a prospective tenant to have an annual income that exceeds 200% of the annual cost of rent. A landlord who violates one of the new prohibitions is subject to an initial penalty of $50, to be paid to the aggrieved party. A landlord who does not cure the violation is also subject to a penalty of $2,500, to be paid to the aggrieved party in addition to the initial penalty and any economic damages, court costs, and attorney fees. A violation is also an unfair housing practice subject to enforcement by private persons, the attorney general, and the Colorado civil rights division. The act prohibits a landlord from requiring a tenant to submit a security deposit in an amount that exceeds the amount of 2 monthly rent payments. The act allows a tenant who is subject to an eviction action to assert as an affirmative defense that the tenant's landlord has violated or is in violation of certain state laws concerning unfair housing practices. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/9/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/11/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/14/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/17/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/17/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/25/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/26/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/27/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/29/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/4/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/5/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/5/2023 Sent to the Governor
6/6/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-201Support Mineral Resources Property Owners' Rights S. Jaquez Lewis (D) / A. Boesenecker (D) | M. Weissman (D)  The Colorado oil and gas conservation commission (commission) may enter an order combining the ownership interests of 2 or more owners of mineral interests located on separate tracts (drilling unit) to authorize the drilling of an oil and gas well on the drilling unit (pooling order). Under certain circumstances and after notice and a hearing, the commission may enter a pooling order for a drilling unit, which order includes an owner of mineral interests that does not consent to the drilling for oil and gas on the mineral owner's tract (forced pooling order). The bill changes the commission's process for entering a forced pooling order by: Requiring an applicant for a forced pooling order to prove that owners of more than 45% of the mineral interests to be pooled consent to pooling by submitting to the commission a third-party expert's title report or title opinion; Requiring the commission to determine if the minerals in the drilling unit may be extracted without disturbing a nonconsenting mineral interest owner's mineral rights and, if so, requiring the commission to include in the forced pooling order a condition that the nonconsenting mineral interest owner's mineral rights not be disturbed. Alternatively, if the commission determines that the minerals cannot be extracted without disturbing the nonconsenting mineral interest owner's mineral rights, the commission is required to make explicit findings of that determination. Requiring that a forced pooling order be issued in a manner that protects and minimizes adverse impacts on public health, safety, and welfare; the environment; and wildlife resources and that protects against adverse environmental impacts on any air, water, soil, or biological resources resulting from oil and gas operations; Reducing the amount of production costs that consenting mineral interest owners in a drilling unit may recover from a nonconsenting mineral interest owner in the drilling unit; and Prohibiting the commission from entering a forced pooling order that includes an unleased, nonconsenting mineral owner that is a local government or a school district, including a charter school or an institute charter school. Additionally, the bill requires that the commission issue a pooling order before any minerals that are subject to the pooling order are extracted or any well is drilled to access the minerals. The bill also authorizes a nonconsenting owner to audit or cause to be audited certain records of the oil and gas operator no more frequently than every 3 years but before any costs are recovered from the drilling unit. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  3/20/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Agriculture & Natural Resources
4/13/2023 Senate Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources Lay Over Amended
4/20/2023 Senate Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources Postpone Indefinitely

Fiscal Note 

SB23-210Monitor Update Administration Of Certain Human Services T. Exum (D) / N. Ricks (D) | L. Frizell (R) Section 1 of the act repeals the statute that: Creates in each region of the division of youth services a community board to promote transparency and community involvement in division of youth services' facilities within the region, provide opportunities for youth to build positive relationships with adult role models, and promote youth involvement within the community; and Specifies the number, manner of appointment, and required qualifications of community board members and meeting requirements for a community board. Section 2 modifies the process for the resolution of grievances filed against county departments of human and social services (county department) concerning the conduct of county department personnel in the performance of their duties relating to children who may be neglected or dependent by: Repealing the requirement that a citizen review panel be created consisting of citizens who are representative of the community, have demonstrable personal or professional knowledge and experience with children, and are not employees or agents of the department of human services (state department) or any county department; Requiring referral of grievances that are currently referred to a citizen review panel to instead be referred to the office of the child protection ombudsman (child ombudsman) for review; Repealing grievance review processes and requirements relating to citizen review panels; Requiring each county department to post information about the grievance process on its public website or otherwise provide information concerning the grievance process to individuals involved in the county child welfare system; and Clarifying that the grievance resolution process allows a person who wishes to file a grievance to do so directly to the child ombudsman. Section 3 specifies that if fewer than all the 17 members of the law enforcement community services grant program committee created in the division of local government of the department of local affairs (department) provided for by statute are appointed as of June 30, 2023, the executive director of the department shall determine the number of members of the committee; except that the committee must consist of at least 9 members. Sections 4 through 14 clarify existing provisions relating to compensation and reimbursement of expenses for members of specific boards and commissions that focus on functions related to human and social services. APPROVED by Governor May 24, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 24, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/20/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Health & Human Services
4/5/2023 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/11/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee
4/12/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/16/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services
4/25/2023 House Committee on Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/25/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/26/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/4/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/4/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/4/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/24/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-213Amend Land Use D. Moreno / I. Jodeh (D) | S. Woodrow (D) Housing needs planning. The executive director of the department of local affairs (director) shall, no later than December 31, 2024, and every 5 years thereafter, issue methodology for developing statewide, regional, and local housing needs assessments. The statewide housing needs assessment must determine existing statewide housing stock and current and future housing needs. The regional housing needs assessments must allocate the addressing of housing needs identified in the statewide housing needs assessment to regions of the state. Similarly, the local housing needs assessments must allocate the addressing of the housing needs allocated in the regional housing needs assessment to localities in the relevant region. The director shall, no later than December 31, 2024, issue guidance on creating a housing needs plan for both a rural resort job center municipality and an urban municipality. Following this guidance, no later than December 31, 2026, and every 5 years thereafter, a rural resort job center municipality and an urban municipality shall develop a housing needs plan and submit that plan to the department of local affairs (department). A housing needs plan must include, among other things, descriptions of how the plan was created, how the municipality will address the housing needs it was assigned in the local housing needs assessment, affordability strategies the municipality has selected to address its local housing needs assessment, an assessment of displacement risk and any strategies selected to address identified risks, and how the locality will comply with other housing requirements in this bill. The director shall, no later than December 31, 2024, develop and publish a menu of affordability strategies to address housing production, preservation, and affordability. Rural resort job center municipalities and urban municipalities shall identify at least 2 of these strategies that they intend to implement in their housing plan, and urban municipalities with a transit-oriented area must identify at least 3. The director shall, no later than December 31, 2024, develop and publish a menu of displacement mitigation measures. This menu must, among other things, provide guidance for how to identify areas at the highest risk for displacement and identify displacement mitigation measures that a locality may adopt. An urban municipality must identify which of these measures it intends to implement in its housing plan to address any areas it identifies as at an elevated risk for displacement. The director shall, no later than March 31, 2024, publish a report that identifies strategic growth objectives that will incentivize growth in transit-oriented areas and infill areas and guide growth at the edges of urban areas. The multi-agency advisory committee shall, no later than March 31, 2024, submit a report to the general assembly concerning the strategic growth objectives. The bill establishes a multi-agency advisory committee and requires that committee to conduct a public comment and hearing process on and provide recommendations to the director on: Methodologies for developing statewide, regional, and local housing needs assessments; Guidance for creating housing needs plans; Developing a menu of affordability strategies; Developing a menu of displacement mitigation measures; Identifying strategic growth objectives; and Developing reporting guidance and templates. A county or municipality within a rural resort region shall participate in a regional housing needs planning process. This process must encourage participating counties and municipalities to identify strategies that, either individually or through intergovernmental agreements, address the housing needs assigned to them. A report on this process must be submitted to the department. Further, within 6 months of completing this process, a rural resort job center municipality shall submit a local housing needs plan to the department. Once a year, both rural resort job centers and urban municipalities shall report to the department on certain housing data. A multi-agency group created in the bill and the division of local government within the department shall provide assistance to localities in complying with the requirements of this bill. This assistance must include technical assistance and a grant program. Accessory dwelling units. The director shall promulgate an accessory dwelling unit model code that, among other things, requires accessory dwelling units to be allowed as a use by right in any part of a municipality where the municipality allows single-unit detached dwellings as a use by right. The committee shall provide recommendations to the director for promulgating this model code. In developing these recommendations, the committee shall conduct a public comment and hearing process. Even if a municipality does not adopt the accessory dwelling unit model code, the municipality shall adhere to accessory dwelling unit minimum standards established in the bill and by the department. These minimum standards, among other things, must require a municipality to: Allow accessory dwelling units as a use by right in any part of the municipality where the municipality allows single-unit detached dwellings as a use by right; Only adopt or enforce local laws concerning accessory dwelling units that use objective standards and procedures; Not adopt, enact, or enforce local laws concerning accessory dwelling units that are more restrictive than local laws concerning single-unit detached dwellings; and Not apply standards that make the permitting, siting, or construction of accessory dwelling units infeasible. Middle housing. The director shall promulgate a middle housing model code that, among other things, requires middle housing to be allowed as a use by right in any part of a rural resort job center municipality or a tier one urban municipality where the municipality allows single-unit detached dwellings as a use by right. The committee shall provide recommendations to the director for promulgating this model code. In developing these recommendations, the committee shall conduct a public comment and hearing process. Even if a rural resort job center municipality or a tier one urban municipality does not adopt the middle housing model code, the municipality shall adhere to middle housing minimum standards established in the bill and by the department. These minimum standards, among other things, must require a municipality to: Allow middle housing as a use by right in certain areas; Only adopt or enforce local laws concerning middle housing that use objective standards and procedures; Allow properties on which middle housing is allowed to be split by right using objective standards and procedures; Not adopt, enact, or enforce local laws concerning middle housing that are more restrictive than local laws concerning single-unit detached dwellings; and Not apply standards that make the permitting, siting, or construction of middle housing infeasible. Transit-oriented areas. The director shall promulgate a transit-oriented area model code that, among other things, imposes minimum residential density limits for multifamily residential housing and mixed-income multifamily residential housing and allows these developments as a use by right in the transit-oriented areas of tier one urban municipalities. The committee shall provide recommendations to the director for promulgating this model code. In developing these recommendations, the committee shall conduct a public comment and hearing process. Even if a tier one urban municipality does not adopt the transit-oriented model code, the municipality shall adhere to middle housing minimum standards established in the bill and by the department. These minimum standards, among other things, must require a municipality to: Create a zoning district within a transit-oriented area in which multifamily housing meets a minimum residential density limit and is allowed as a use by right; and Not apply standards that make the permitting, siting, or construction of multifamily housing in transit-oriented areas infeasible. Key corridors. The director shall promulgate a key corridor model code that applies to key corridors in rural resort job center municipalities and tier one urban municipalities. The model code must, among other things, include requirements for: The percentage of units in mixed-income multifamily residential housing that must be reserved for low- and moderate-income households; Minimum residential density limits for multifamily residential housing; and Mixed-income multifamily residential housing that must be allowed as a use by right in key corridors. The committee shall provide recommendations to the director for promulgating this model code. In developing these recommendations, the committee shall conduct a public comment and hearing process. Even if a rural resort job center municipality or a tier one urban municipality does not adopt the key corridor model code, the municipality shall adhere to key corridor minimum standards promulgated by the director and developed by the department. These minimum standards, among other things, must identify a net residential zoning capacity for a municipality and must require a municipality to: Allow multifamily residential housing within key corridors that meets the net residential zoning capacity as a use by right; Not apply standards that make the permitting, siting, or construction of multifamily housing in certain areas infeasible; and Not adopt, enact, or enforce local laws that make satisfying the required minimum residential density limits infeasible. The committee shall provide recommendations to the director on promulgating these minimum standards. In developing these recommendations, the committee shall conduct a public comment and hearing process. Adoption of model codes and minimum standards. A relevant municipality shall adopt either the model code or local laws that satisfy the minimum standards concerning accessory dwelling units, middle housing, transit-oriented areas, and key corridors. Furthermore, a municipality shall submit a report to the department demonstrating that it has done so. If a municipality fails to adopt either the model code or local laws that satisfy the minimum standards by a specified deadline, the relevant model code immediately goes into effect, and municipalities shall then approve any proposed projects that meet the standards in the model code using objective procedures. However, a municipality may apply to the department for a deadline extension for a deficiency in water or wastewater infrastructure or supply.Additional provisions. The bill also: Requires the advisory committee on factory-built structures and tiny homes to produce a report on the opportunities and barriers in state law concerning the building of manufactured homes, mobile homes, and tiny homes; Removes the requirements that manufacturers of factory-built structures comply with escrow requirements of down payments and provide a letter of credit, certificate of deposit issued by a licensed financial institution, or surety bond issued by an authorized insurer; Prohibits a planned unit development resolution or ordinance for a planned unit with a residential use from restricting accessory dwelling units, middle housing, housing in transit-oriented areas, or housing in key corridors in a way not allowed by this bill; Prohibits a local government from enacting or enforcing residential occupancy limits that differ based on the relationships of the occupants of a dwelling; Modifies the content requirements for a county and municipal master plan, requires counties and municipalities to adopt or amend master plans as part of an inclusive process, and requires counties and municipalities to submit master plans to the department; Allows a municipality to sell and dispose of real property and public buildings for the purpose of providing property to be used as affordable housing, without requiring the sale to be submitted to the voters of the municipality; Requires the approval process for manufactured and modular homes to be based on objective standards and administrative review equivalent to the approval process for site-built homes; Prohibits a municipality from imposing more restrictive standards on manufactured and modular homes than the municipality imposes on site-built homes; Prohibits certain municipalities from imposing minimum square footage requirements for residential units in the approval of residential dwelling unit construction permits; Requires certain entities to submit to the Colorado water conservation board (board) a completed and validated water loss audit report pursuant to guidelines that the board shall adopt; Allows the board to make grants from the water efficiency grant program cash fund to provide water loss audit report validation assistance to covered entities; Allows the board and the Colorado water resources and power development authority to consider whether an entity has submitted a required audit report in deciding whether to release financial assistance to the entity for the construction of a water diversion, storage, conveyance, water treatment, or wastewater treatment facility; Prohibits a unit owners' association from restricting accessory dwelling units, middle housing, housing in transit-oriented areas, or housing in key corridors; Requires the department of transportation to ensure that the prioritization criteria for any grant program administered by the department are consistent with state strategic growth objectives, so long as doing so does not violate federal law; Requires any regional transportation plan that is created or updated to address and ensure consistency with state strategic growth objectives; Requires that expenditures for local and state multimodal projects from the multimodal transportation options fund are only to be made for multimodal projects that the department determines are consistent with state strategic growth objectives; and For state fiscal year 2023-24, appropriates $15,000,000 from the general fund to the housing plans assistance fund and makes the department responsible for the accounting related to the appropriation.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  3/22/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing
4/18/2023 Senate Committee on Local Government & Housing Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/26/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/27/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/28/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government
4/28/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/2/2023 House Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/4/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/4/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/5/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/6/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Laid Over Daily

Fiscal Note 

SB23-230Support County Assistance For 23rd Judicial District J. Bridges (D) | B. Kirkmeyer (R) / E. Sirota (D) | R. Bockenfeld (R) The act directs the state court administrator's office to reimburse counties located in the eighteenth judicial district for expenses related to establishing a district attorney's office in the new twenty-third judicial district. The act appropriates $668,600 to the judicial department. APPROVED by Governor April 17, 2023 EFFECTIVE April 17, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/24/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Appropriations
3/28/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/29/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
3/30/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/30/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Appropriations
4/3/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/4/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/5/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/6/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/12/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/12/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/13/2023 Sent to the Governor
4/17/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-233Support Employment Services Funded By Wagner-Peyser Act R. Zenzinger (D) | B. Kirkmeyer (R) / E. Sirota (D) | R. Bockenfeld (R) The act requires a county that seeks to use county department employees (employees) to deliver employment services that are funded through the federal "Wagner-Peyser Act" to create a merit system for the selection, retention, and promotion of these employees. The act requires each county's merit system to conform to specific standards. If a county already has a system in place, the county is required to update the system to comply with the standards. APPROVED by Governor April 17, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/24/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Appropriations
3/28/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/29/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
3/30/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/30/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Appropriations
4/3/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/3/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/4/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/6/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/11/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/11/2023 Sent to the Governor
4/11/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/17/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-244 Technology Accessibility Cleanup J. Bridges (D) | R. Zenzinger (D) / S. Bird (D) | E. Sirota (D) The act clarifies statutory language to ensure the provision of reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. The act requires the office of information technology to promulgate rules regarding accessibility standards for an individual with a disability for information technology systems employed by state agencies. The act clarifies language regarding sanctions for failing to comply with accessibility standards. APPROVED by Governor April 20, 2023 EFFECTIVE April 20, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/24/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Appropriations
3/28/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended - Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
3/29/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
3/30/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
3/30/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Appropriations
4/3/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
4/3/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
4/4/2023 House Third Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
4/6/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/12/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
4/12/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
4/13/2023 Sent to the Governor
4/20/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-274 Water Quality Control Fee-setting By Rule F. Winter (D) / R. Dickson | W. Lindstedt (D) Section 1 of the act increases the percent of appropriated funds that the department of public health and environment (department) may use for the administration and management of the public water systems and domestic wastewater treatment works grant program from 5% to 10%. Section 3 modifies the composition of the water quality control commission (commission) by requiring that: No more than 5 members of the commission be affiliated with the same political party; and The commission include members with specific types of expertise, including expertise in areas of science, environmental law, environmental policy, municipal water treatment, municipal wastewater treatment, industry, or labor. Section 4 requires the commission, on or before October 31, 2025, and after engaging in stakeholder outreach, to set the following fees by rule: Drinking water fees assessed on public water systems; Commerce and industry sector permitting fees; Construction sector permitting fees; Pesticide sector permitting fees; Public and private utilities sector permitting fees; Municipal separate storm sewer systems sector permit fees; Review fees for requests for certification under section 401 of the federal "Clean Water Act"; Preliminary effluent limitation determination fees; Wastewater site application and design review fees; On-site wastewater treatment system fees; and Biosolids management program fees. The commission's fee-setting rules must become effective on or before January 1, 2026, and the commission may by rule authorize the division to phase in the fee-setting rules before January 1, 2026. Section 4 also creates the clean water cash fund into which the fees collected under the commission's fee-setting rules are credited, except that the fees assessed on public water systems under the drinking water fee-setting rules are credited to the drinking water cash fund. The statutory fee provisions in sections 2, 5, 6, and 8 repeal on July 1, 2026. Before the repeal, the state treasurer is required to transfer any money remaining in the funds into which the statutory fees are credited to the clean water cash fund; except that section 2 specifies that drinking water fees will continue to be credited to the drinking water cash fund and that any money in the drinking water cash fund will remain in that cash fund. Section 7 repeals the division of administration's (division's) regulatory authority concerning nuclear and radioactive wastes. Section 9 requires the division to include, in its annual reporting to the commission and the general assembly, information on: The division's implementation and enforcement of the discharge permitting program (program); For reports submitted before October 1, 2025, the division's fee revenue and direct and indirect costs associated with the program; and For the report submitted in 2025, the fee structure set forth in the commission's proposed or adopted fee-setting rules. APPROVED by Governor May 17, 2023 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE May 17, 2023 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE July 1, 2026 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/11/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/18/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/21/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/24/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
4/24/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Energy & Environment
4/27/2023 House Committee on Energy & Environment Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
5/1/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/2/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/9/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/10/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/10/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/17/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-286 Access To Government Records C. Hansen (D) / M. Snyder (D) | M. Soper (R) The act makes the following changes to the "Colorado Open Records Act" (CORA): Prohibits a custodian of public records from requiring a requester to provide any form of identification to request or inspect records pursuant to CORA unless a requester is otherwise required to provide identification pursuant to law; Clarifies that if a public record is available in a digital format that is searchable, the custodian is required to provide a digital copy of the record in a searchable format unless otherwise requested by the requester; Specifies that if a public record is available in a digital format, the custodian is required to transmit copy of the record in a digital format by electronic mail or by another mutually-agreed upon transmission method if the size of the record prevents transmission by electronic mail; Prohibits a custodian from converting a digital record into a non-searchable format prior to transmission; Allows a custodian to deny a requester's right to inspect the telephone number or home address that a person provides to an elected official, agency, institution, or political subdivision of the state for the purpose of future communication with the elected official, agency, institution, or political subdivision of the state; Notwithstanding specified provisions of law, makes certain records of sexual harassment complaints made against an elected official and the results or report of investigations regarding alleged sexual harassment by an elected official available for inspection if the investigation concludes that the elected official is culpable for any act of sexual harassment; Requires each member of the general assembly, the governor's office and each office of the governor, and each state agency and institution to submit, on or before January 1, 2024, a report to the staff of the legislative council of the general assembly outlining its respective electronic mail retention policy; Prohibits a custodian from charging a per-page fee for providing copies of a public record if the record is provided in a digital or electronic format; and Requires a custodian to allow records requesters to pay any fee or deposit associated with the request via a credit card or electronic payment if the custodian allows members of the public to pay for any other service or product provided by the custodian with a credit card or electronic payment. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/17/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to State, Veterans, & Military Affairs
4/20/2023 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/28/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/28/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/1/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs
5/1/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/1/2023 Senate Third Reading Reconsidered - No Amendments
5/1/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/3/2023 House Committee on State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/6/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
5/6/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee
5/7/2023 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/8/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/16/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/17/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/17/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
6/6/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-290 Natural Medicine Regulation And Legalization S. Fenberg (D) / J. Amabile (D) The act amends the regulatory framework for natural medicine and natural medicine product. The act requires the director of the division of professions and occupations to: Regulate facilitators and the practice of regulation, including issuing licenses for facilitators; Promulgate rules necessary for the regulation of facilitators and the practice of facilitation; and Perform duties necessary for the implementation and administration of the "Natural Medicine Health Act of 2022", including investigatory and disciplinary authority. The act creates the natural medicine advisory board (board). The board's duties include examining issues related to natural medicine and natural medicine product, and making recommendations to the director of the division of professions and occupations and the executive director of the state licensing authority. The act creates the federally recognized American tribes and Indigenous community working group (working group). The working group's duties include studying issues related to legalizing and regulating natural medicine and natural medicine product, the effect of legalization and regulation on federally recognized American tribes and Indigenous people and communities, and making recommendations to the director of the division of professions and occupations and the board. The act creates within the department of revenue the natural medicine division for the purpose of regulating and licensing the cultivation, manufacturing, testing, storage, distribution, transport, transfer, and dispensation of natural medicine or natural medicine product between natural medicine licensees. The act requires the natural medicine division to: Regulate natural medicine, natural medicine product, and natural medicine businesses, including healing centers, cultivators, manufacturers, and testers, and issue licenses for such businesses; Promulgate rules necessary for the regulation of natural medicine, natural medicine product, and natural medicine businesses; and Perform duties necessary for the regulation of natural medicine, natural medicine product, and natural medicine businesses, including investigatory and disciplinary authority. The act requires the department of revenue to coordinate with the department of public health and environment concerning testing standards of regulated natural medicine and natural medicine product. The act requires a sunset review for the articles governing the department of regulatory affairs and the department of revenue in the regulation of natural medicine, natural medicine product, facilitators, and natural medicine businesses. The act states that: A person who is under 21 years of age who knowingly possesses or consumes natural medicine or natural medicine product commits a drug petty offense and is subject to a fine of not more than $100 or not more than 4 hours of substance use education or counseling; except that a second or subsequent offense is subject to a fine of not more than $100, not more than 4 hours of substance use education or counseling, and not more than 24 hours of useful public service; A person who openly and publicly consumes natural medicine or natural medicine product commits a drug petty offense and is subject to a fine of not more than $100 and not more than 24 hours of useful public service; A person who knowingly cultivates natural medicine is required to do so on the person's private property, subject to area and physical security requirements. A person who violates this provision commits a drug petty offense and is subject to a fine of not more than $1,000. A person who is not licensed to manufacture natural medicine product and who knowingly manufactures natural medicine product using an inherently hazardous substance commits a level 2 drug felony; Unless expressly limited, a person who, for the purpose of personal use and without remuneration, possesses, consumes, shares, cultivates, or manufactures natural medicine or natural medicine product does not violate state or local law; except that nothing permits a person to distribute natural medicine or natural medicine product to a person for certain unlawful purposes; Unless expressly limited, a person who performs testing on natural medicine or natural medicine product for another person who is 21 years of age or older who submits for testing natural medicine or natural medicine product intended for personal use does not violate state or local law; A peace officer is prohibited from arresting, and a district attorney is prohibited from charging or prosecuting, a person for a criminal offense pursuant to part 4 of article 18 of title 18 involving natural medicine or natural medicine product, unless expressly provided by the act; A lawful action related to natural medicine or natural medicine product must not be the sole reason to subject a person to a civil penalty, deny a right or privilege, or seize assets; A lawful action related to natural medicine or natural medicine product must not be used as the sole factor in a probable cause determination of any criminal offense; except that an action may be used in such determination if the original stop or search was lawful and other factors are present to support a probable cause determination of any criminal offense; The fact that a person is entitled to consume natural medicine or natural medicine product does not constitute a defense against any charge for violation of an offense related to operation of a vehicle, aircraft, boat, machinery, or other device; A local jurisdiction is prohibited from adopting, enacting, or enforcing a conflicting law; and A person or entity who occupies, owns, or controls a property may prohibit or otherwise regulate the cultivation or manufacture of natural medicine or natural medicine product on or in that property. The act states that the juvenile court has exclusive original jurisdiction in proceedings concerning a juvenile 10 years of age or older who has violated an offense concerning natural medicine or natural medicine product. Furthermore, the juvenile court and county court have concurrent jurisdiction over a juvenile who is 10 years of age or older who has violated an offense concerning natural medicine product; except that if the juvenile court accepts jurisdiction, the county court jurisdiction terminates. The act states that an act involving natural medicine or natural medicine product that is performed by a person: Does not solely constitute child abuse or neglect, or grounds for restricting or prohibiting family time; Does not constitute an offense such that its possession or use constitutes a violation of conditions of probation or parole; Does not solely constitute grounds for denying health insurance coverage; Does not solely constitute grounds for discrimination for organ donation; and Must not be considered for public assistance benefits eligibility, unless required by federal law. The act makes a person eligible to file a motion to have conviction records related to natural medicine or natural medicine product sealed. Under federal law, certain expenses are disallowed under section 280E of the internal revenue code. Under state law, the state income tax code permits taxpayers who are licensed under the "Colorado Marijuana Code" to subtract expenses that are disallowed by section 280E of the internal revenue code. The act expands this permission to taxpayers who are licensed under the "Colorado Natural Medicine Code". For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the act appropriates: $733,658 from the general fund to the department of revenue, of which, $190,332 is reappropriated to the department of law; $101,150 from the legal services cash fund to the department of law; and $838,402 from the general fund to the department of public health and environment. APPROVED by Governor May 23, 2023 EFFECTIVE July 1, 2023 (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/18/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/20/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/24/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/24/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/25/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/25/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
4/27/2023 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
4/28/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
4/28/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/29/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/2/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/8/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/8/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/9/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/23/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-291 Utility Regulation S. Fenberg (D) | L. Cutter (D) / C. deGruy Kennedy (D) | M. Martinez (D) Section 1 of the act requires the public utilities commission (commission), if relying on a discount rate when calculating the net present value of future carbon-based fuel costs as part of a utility's electric resource plan, to apply a discount rate that does not exceed the long-term rate of inflation. The commission is required to determine an appropriate rate of inflation specifically for fuel costs. Section 2 requires the commission to establish rules to limit the amount of rate case expenses that an investor-owned electric or gas utility may recover from the utility's customers. In reviewing an investor-owned utility's application to modify base rates, the commission is required to certify that sufficient information is included in the application, including a comprehensive cost and revenue requirement analysis. Section 3 prohibits an investor-owned electric or gas utility from recovering various costs from its customers, including: More than 50% of annual total compensation or of expense reimbursement for a utility's board of directors; Tax penalties or fines issued against the utility; Investor-relation expenses; Certain advertising and public relations expenses; Lobbying and other expenses intended to influence the outcome of local, state, or federal legislation or ballot measures; Charitable giving expenses; Certain organizational and membership dues; Certain political contributions or expenses; Travel, lodging, food, or beverage expenses for the utility's board of directors and officers; Gift or entertainment expenses; Expenses related to aircraft for a utility's board of directors and officers; and Expenses related to unregulated products or services sold or provided by a utility. If an investor-owned utility recovers prohibited costs, the commission may assess a nonrecoverable penalty against the utility and is required to order the utility to refund the amount improperly recovered to its customers, plus interest. An investor-owned utility is required to file an annual report with the commission on the utility's compliance with the cost recovery prohibitions, which report must include the purpose, payee, and amount of any expenses associated with costs and activities not permitted to be recovered from customers. Section 4 requires that, on or before November 1, 2023, an investor-owned gas utility file with the commission for the commission's approval, amendment, or denial a gas price risk management plan that includes proposals for addressing the volatility of fuel costs recovered from the utility's customers pursuant to the utility's gas cost adjustment filings. Section 4 requires the commission to adopt rules, on or before January 1, 2025, to help protect investor-owned electric or gas utility customers from the volatility of gas prices by establishing mechanisms that align an investor-owned utility's financial incentives with the financial interests of its customers regarding incurred fuel costs. In adopting the rules, the commission is required to consider mechanisms to create a financial incentive for an investor-owned utility to improve its electricity production cost efficiency while minimizing its fuel costs. As part of its rules, the commission shall also consider, to the extent such information is relevant, each investor-owned electric or gas utility's financial health and corresponding impacts on customer affordability. Section 4 also requires the commission to open a proceeding to investigate whether and how residential and other development in certain geographic areas drive natural gas infrastructure costs for any natural gas utility that serves more than 500,000 customers in the state. After completing the investigation, the commission shall consider whether alternative infrastructure, service investments, or other actions by the utility could mitigate impacts of such development on nonparticipating or income-qualified utility customers. Section 5 requires: On or before December 31, 2023, each regulated gas utility to remove from the utility's rate tariffs incentives offered to an applicant applying for natural gas service to establish gas service to a property; The Colorado energy office to contract with an independent third party, on or before July 1, 2024, to evaluate the risk that stranded or underutilized natural gas infrastructure investments pose, including the risk posed to utility employees and contractors, and the annual projected rate impact that such stranded assets have on utility customers; The commission to determine whether any changes to rules or depreciation schedules are warranted based on its review of the evaluation contracted by the Colorado energy office; An investor-owned gas utility to provide the commission information, including a map, about the utility's gas distribution system pipes; An investor-owned gas utility to refrain from penalizing or charging a fee to a customer that voluntarily terminates gas service. The commission may adopt rules to establish standards for a customer's voluntary disconnection from an investor-owned gas utility's gas distribution system. On or before January 1, 2024, the commission to examine existing investor-owned electric utility tariffs, policies, and practices to determine if they pose a barrier to the beneficial electrification of transportation and buildings and determine whether requiring a customer that seeks to interconnect distributed energy resources or beneficial electrification resources to bear the full incremental cost of transformer or service upgrades needed for such interconnection imposes an undue burden on the customer. Section 6 requires the commission to allow a wholesale customer of an investor-owned utility to intervene in a proceeding regarding the commission's consideration of the investor-owned utility's application for cost recovery from customers if the wholesale customer has a demonstrated interest in the proceeding. Section 7 appropriates for the 2023-24 state fiscal year: $1,347,554 from the public utilities commission fixed utility fund to the department of regulatory agencies for use by the commission, with $713,745 reappropriated to the department of law; and $142,749 to the department of law from the legal services cash fund from revenue received from the Colorado energy office that originates as custodial federal funds that the office has authority to expend. APPROVED by Governor May 11, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/18/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
4/20/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
4/21/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
4/25/2023 Senate Second Reading Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
4/26/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
4/28/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
5/1/2023 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations
5/3/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/5/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/6/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/9/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/10/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/10/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/11/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-303 Reduce Property Taxes And Voter-approved Revenue Change S. Fenberg (D) | C. Hansen (D) / C. deGruy Kennedy (D) | M. Weissman (D) The act requires the secretary of state to refer a ballot issue to voters at the November 2023 election. Most of the act only becomes effective if the voters approve the ballot issue. Beginning with the 2023 property tax year, the act establishes a limit on specified property tax revenue for local governments, excluding those that are home rule and school districts, that is equal to inflation above the property tax revenue from the prior property tax year (limit). A local government may establish a temporary property tax credit up to the number of mills necessary to prevent the local government's property tax revenue from exceeding the limit. Alternatively, the governing board may approve a mill levy that would cause the local government to exceed the limit if the governing board approves the mill levy at a public meeting that meets certain criteria. The act temporarily reduces the valuation for assessment (valuation) for certain subclasses of nonresidential and residential property for the property tax years 2023 through 2032 and creates the new subclass of renewable energy agricultural land, which is a subclass of nonresidential property. The act also establishes the residential real property subclasses of primary residence real property and qualified-senior primary residence real property and establishes administrative procedures related to the classification that are based on the procedures for the homestead exemption, with those procedures expanded to treat civil union partners like spouses. Several property tax deadlines for the 2023 property tax year are delayed because of the possible valuation reductions that are contingent on the 2023 ballot. County assessors are required to provide information to taxpayers about the new valuations for assessment and the application process for primary residence real property and qualified-senior primary residence real property. The act modifies an existing mechanism designed to reimburse local governmental entities for property tax revenue reductions by extending the backfill through 2032, incorporating the lost revenue due to the act, clarifying how the reimbursement is determined, excluding local governmental entities that have a certain amount of growth in assessed value, capping the total amount of state backfill, and eliminating the cap on the amount of excess state revenues that may be used for the reimbursements for the 2023 property tax year. If the voters approve the referred ballot issue, which the act requires to be called "proposition HH", then the state will be authorized to retain and spend revenues up to the proposition HH cap, the amount of which is determined under the act. The ability of the general assembly to continue retaining and spending this money after the fiscal year 2031-32 is contingent on the general assembly enacting future valuation reductions. The amount retained under this authority is first used in the following fiscal year to backfill certain local governments for the reduced property tax revenue as a result of the property tax changes in the act and Senate Bill 22-238 "Concerning reductions in real property taxation for only the 2023 and 2024 property tax years" and then up to $20 million for the amount of property taxes that are paid as a portion of a tenant's rent. Any remaining amounts are transferred to the state education fund to offset the revenue that school districts lose as a result of the property tax changes. APPROVED by Governor May 24, 2023 EFFECTIVE May 24, 2023 NOTE: The act takes effect only if a majority of voters approve the ballot issue referred in accordance with section 24-77-202, and in which case the act takes effect on the date of the official declaration of the vote thereon by the governor; except that, section 3; section 39-1-104.2 (3.7); section 39-3-210 (1)(a.3), (1)(e), and (2.5); section 18; section 23; and section 24 of the act take effect upon passage. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/1/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Appropriations
5/2/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments
5/2/2023 Senate Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/4/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Appropriations
5/4/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/6/2023 House Committee on Appropriations Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/7/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/8/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass
5/8/2023 House Third Reading Passed with Amendments - Floor
5/10/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/15/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/15/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/24/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note 

SB23-304 Property Tax Valuation C. Hansen (D) | S. Fenberg (D) / B. Marshall (D) | S. Bird (D) The act specifies that when a property tax assessor values real property, the property tax assessor shall consider: The current use; Existing zoning and other governmental land use or environmental regulations and restrictions; Multi-year leases or other contractual arrangements affecting the use of or income from real property; Easements and reservations of record; and Covenants, conditions, and restrictions of record. Beginning January 1, 2024, the act requires counties with a population greater than 300,000 to use an alternative procedure to determine objections and protests of property tax valuations in any year of general reassessment of real property that is valued biennially. At the request of a taxpayer, the law requires a property tax assessor to provide the taxpayer with certain data that the assessor used to determine the value of the taxpayer's property. The act clarifies that the data the assessor is required to provide must include the primary method and rates the assessor used to value the property. APPROVED by Governor May 24, 2023 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2023 NOTE: This act was passed without a safety clause and takes effect 90 days after sine die.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/1/2023 Introduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance
5/2/2023 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Senate Committee of the Whole
5/3/2023 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Passed - No Amendments
5/4/2023 Introduced In House - Assigned to Finance
5/4/2023 Senate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/5/2023 House Committee on Finance Refer Amended to House Committee of the Whole
5/6/2023 House Second Reading Special Order - Passed with Amendments - Committee, Floor
5/7/2023 House Third Reading Passed - No Amendments
5/8/2023 House Considered Senate Adherence - Result was to Recede
5/8/2023 Senate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Adhere
5/10/2023 Signed by the President of the Senate
5/15/2023 Sent to the Governor
5/15/2023 Signed by the Speaker of the House
5/24/2023 Governor Signed

Fiscal Note