Mental Health Colorado's Bill Tracker 2024
Bill # PositionCalendar NotificationBill TitleSponsorsBill SummaryMost Recent Status
HB24-1002 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the enactment of the "Social Work Licensure Compact", and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. E. Sirota (D) | M. Martinez (D) / J. Marchman (D) | J. Rich (R) The act enacts the "Social Work Licensure Compact" (compact). The compact is designed to: Eliminate the necessity for social workers to obtain licenses from multiple states by providing for the mutual recognition of licenses from other states that have signed the compact (member states); Facilitate the exchange of licensure and disciplinary information among member states; Authorize member states to hold a regulated social worker accountable for abiding by a member state's laws, regulations, and applicable professional standards in the member state in which the client is located at the time care is rendered; and Allow for the use of telehealth to facilitate increased access to regulated social work services. The act authorizes the state board of social work examiners (board) to promulgate rules and to facilitate Colorado's participation in the compact, including notifying the social work licensure compact commission (commission) established by the compact of any adverse action taken by the board against a Colorado regulated social worker. The commission includes a delegate from each member state and has the powers and duties set forth in the act. The compact becomes effective on the date the compact is enacted in the seventh member state. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $78,750 from the division of professions and occupations cash fund to the department of regulatory agencies for use by the division of professions and occupations to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/3/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1003 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning measures related to harm reduction for students. B. McLachlan (D) | M. Young (D) / C. Simpson (R) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) Under current law, a school district, the state charter school institute, or the governing board of a nonpublic school may adopt a policy for a school to maintain a supply of and distribute opiate antagonists. The act allows the adoption of a similar policy for maintaining a supply of opiate antagonists on school buses and extends existing civil and criminal immunity to school bus operators and other employees present on buses if they furnish or administer an opiate antagonist in good faith, in addition to other requirements. Additionally, the act allows an adopted policy to allow an employee or agent of the school to furnish an opiate antagonist to any individual, including a student, but only if the student has received school-sponsored training. Under current law, a school district, the state charter school institute, or the governing board of a nonpublic school may adopt a policy for a school to maintain a supply of and distribute non-laboratory synthetic opiate detection tests. The act allows the adoption of a similar policy for non-laboratory additive detection tests and extends existing civil immunity provisions to include non-laboratory additive detection tests. The act requires a school, school district, or the state charter school institute to not prohibit a student of the school district or institute charter school to possess or administer on school grounds, on a school bus, or at any school-sponsored event an opiate antagonist and possess a non-laboratory synthetic opiate detection test or a non-laboratory additive detection test. APPROVED by Governor April 22, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/22/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1007 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning residential occupancy limits. M. Rutinel (D) | J. Mabrey (D) / T. Exum (D) | J. Gonzales (D) The act prohibits counties, cities and counties, and municipalities from limiting the number of people who may live together in a single dwelling based on familial relationship, while allowing local governments to implement residential occupancy limits based only on: Demonstrated health and safety standards, such as international building code standards, fire code regulations, or Colorado department of public health and environment wastewater and water quality standards; or Local, state, federal, or political subdivision affordable housing program guidelines. APPROVED by Governor April 15, 2024 EFFECTIVE July 1, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/15/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1009 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning requiring the department of early childhood to provide child care licensing resources in prevalent languages, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. J. Joseph (D) | B. McLachlan (D) / J. Ginal (D) | J. Rich (R) The act requires the department of early childhood (department) to provide education and information in plain language and in prevalent languages to help individuals complete the paperwork required to meet child care licensing compliance requirements. Prevalent languages is defined as the 2 most prevalent languages spoken in Colorado. The department is required to provide services in prevalent languages to individuals seeking to open or otherwise participate in the operation of an early childhood program or facility licensed by the department. The act creates the bilingual licensing unit in the department to help the department satisfy its duties to provide education, information, and services in prevalent languages and requires the general assembly to appropriate $235,000 from the general fund to the department for the 2024-25 state fiscal year and for each state fiscal year thereafter to pay the costs of the bilingual licensing unit's activities. The act also requires the general assembly to appropriate $45,000 from the general fund to the department for the 2024-25 state fiscal year to pay costs associated with updating the department's mobile licensing application. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 6, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1010 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning limitations on drugs covered under an individual's health insurance policy that are administered by a provider in a setting other than a hospital, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. I. Jodeh (D) | M. Soper (R) / D. Michaelson Jenet (D) | P. Will (R) For the treatment of cancer or a life-threatening disease or for the treatment of a symptom, complication, or consequence of cancer or a life-threatening disease, the act prohibits a carrier, with respect to a health benefit plan issued on or after January 1, 2025, from: Requiring a provider-administered drug to be dispensed only by specific network pharmacies; If a provider-administered drug is otherwise covered by the carrier for the covered person, limiting or excluding coverage for the drug based on the covered person's choice of participating provider; Requiring a participating provider to bill for or be reimbursed for the delivery and administration of a provider-administered drug under the pharmacy benefit instead of the medical benefit without informed, written consent of the covered person and written attestation by the covered person's participating provider that a delay in the drug's administration will not place the covered person at an increased health risk; or Requiring a covered person to pay additional fees, copayments, or coinsurance based on the covered person's choice of pharmacy. The act also requires the reimbursement rate for covered provider-administered drugs to be at the carrier's in-network negotiated rate for participating providers. The act appropriates $7,333 to the department of regulatory agencies for use by the division of insurance from the division of insurance cash fund to implement the act. VETOED by Governor May 17, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/17/2024 Governor Vetoed
HB24-1017 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning a bill of rights for youth in foster care. L. Daugherty (D) | J. Parenti (D) / R. Zenzinger (D) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) The act establishes a statutory bill of rights for children and youth (youth) in foster care in Colorado, including youth participating in the foster youth in transition program but excluding youth detained by or committed to the care and physical custody of the division of youth services. The office of the child's representative shall develop a written notice of the rights, and a county department of human or social services shall provide each youth who is 5 years of age or older with the written notice in the youth's primary language at the time of the youth's initial placement in foster care, at each placement change, and at least annually. APPROVED by Governor April 24, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/24/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1019 (2024 Session)Amend NOT ON CALENDARConcerning expanding a program to continue responding to youth behavioral health crises. M. Bradfield (R) | J. Amabile (D) / R. Fields (D) | R. Pelton (R)  Legislative Oversight Committee Concerning the Treatment of Persons with Behavioral Health Disorders in the Criminal and Juvenile Justice Systems. Under current law, the department of human services (department) offers statewide access to crisis system services (services) for children and youth. The bill expands the services provided through the creation of the crisis resolution team program (program) in the department. The behavioral health administration (BHA) shall administer the program to provide community-based services to de-escalate and stabilize children or youth experiencing high-acuity behavioral health crises. The BHA shall contract with crisis resolution team providers (providers) to provide community-based de-escalation and stabilization services to children or youth. A child or youth is eligible for services provided by the program if the child or youth: Is 21 years of age or younger; Has experienced high-acuity behavioral health crises as identified by the behavioral health crisis response system or emergency departments; and Is safe to remain in the home or the community while receiving intensive, short-term stabilization interventions. Providers shall offer the following services to children or youth and their caregivers: Counseling or therapy; Case management to help meet treatment plans; Peer support or family skills coaching to foster connectedness, goal setting, and new routines to achieve positive, lasting change; Medication management; and Care coordination to provide tailored support and connection. Providers shall offer services to a child or youth a minimum of 3 days per week with a variety of services offered daily depending on the child's or youth's clinical needs. Services must be offered to the child or youth for a minimum of 4 weeks up to a maximum of 6 weeks depending on the child's or youth's clinical needs. The BHA shall: Maintain existing relationships with community partners; Conduct outreach and educate community partners regarding providers' services; Provide technical assistance to providers regarding specialized training and the use of screening and assessment tools; and Conduct an annual evaluation of the program. On or before September 1, 2025, the BHA shall submit to the general assembly a feasibility study to determine whether the program can be further expanded statewide. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  5/14/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed
HB24-1023 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning civil forfeitures. K. DeGraaf (R) / M. Baisley (R)  The bill makes the following changes to forfeiture actions: A forfeiture order must not be entered unless: The civil complaint is filed within 90 days after the property is seized; and The plaintiff establishes that the seized property is an instrumentality of, or proceeds derived directly from, the crime for which the owner is convicted; When feasible, the court hearing the criminal proceeding also hears the civil forfeiture action; All proceedings in the forfeiture action are stayed until a criminal conviction is obtained; Any party to a forfeiture action may appeal an order concerning disposition of seized property except the defendant in the criminal action, who may only appeal after the final judgment; A forfeiture order must not be entered until there is a criminal conviction, unless a specified exception is met; Any person with an interest in the seized property may request a prompt post-seizure hearing within 14 days after the seizure; and 25% of the proceeds of a forfeiture are deposited in a new forfeiture defense fund created in the bill rather than the law enforcement community services grant program fund. The bill also authorizes the judge in a forfeiture proceeding to appoint an attorney to represent an indigent owner of an interest in seized property. Fees and costs of the appointed attorney may be charged against other parties to the proceeding or may come from the new forfeiture defense fund if a party is indigent. The bill prohibits a Colorado law enforcement agency from transferring seized property to a federal agency for forfeiture unless the Colorado law enforcement agency is part of a joint task force with the federal government, and then only if the seized property includes at least $50,000 in U.S. currency. The bill makes conforming amendments. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/6/2024 House Committee on Judiciary Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1027 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning tax relief for products essential to minors, and, in connection therewith, creating a sales and use tax exemption for baby and toddler products and creating a sales and use tax holiday for back-to-school items. T. Winter (R) / B. Pelton (R)  Section 1 of the bill creates, beginning on January 1, 2025, and continuing indefinitely, a state sales and use tax exemption for baby and toddler products. A "baby and toddler product" is defined to include a baby crib, playpen, or play yard; a baby stroller; a baby safety gate, cabinet lock or latch, or electrical socket cover; a baby monitor; a bicycle child carrier seat, or trailer, including an adaptor or accessory; a baby exerciser, jumper, bouncer seat, or swing; a breast pump, bottle sterilizer, bottle, or nipple, pacifier, or teething ring; baby wipes; a changing table or pad; and baby and toddler clothing. Section 1 also creates a time-limited state sales and use tax exemption, or sales and use tax holiday, for back-to-school items. The tax holiday applies for 14 days beginning on January 1, 2025, and for an additional 14 days beginning on July 24, 2025. A "back-to-school item" is defined to mean an article of clothing, a bag, a school supply, a learning aid, or a personal computer or personal computer-related accessory that is purchased primarily for use by an individual who is a minor. The exemption for each item is limited by cost as follows: $100 for an article of clothing or a bag; $50 for a school supply; $30 for a learning aid; and $1,500 for a personal computer or a personal computer-related accessory. Section 2 permits a town, city, or county to create sales and use tax exemptions that are identical to the state exemptions.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  5/14/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed
HB24-1028 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the authorization for a municipality to allow for the operation of an overdose prevention center within its jurisdiction. E. Epps (D) / K. Priola (D)  The bill specifies that the governing body of a municipality, which includes a city, town, and city and county, may authorize the operation of an overdose prevention center within the municipality's boundaries for the purpose of saving the lives of persons at risk of preventable overdoses. (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  4/18/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1031 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning measures to increase accessibility provided to persons who are involved in matters regarding a child's welfare, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. B. Bradley (R) | J. Joseph (D) / B. Kirkmeyer (R) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) The act requires that certain services provided to children or their families comply with the provisions of Title VI of the federal "Civil Rights Act of 1964" if they are provided by a county department of human or social services (county department), city and county, or a private-entity contractor. Furthermore, the act requires that the county department, city and county, or private-entity contractor take reasonable steps to ensure meaningful language access to services in the person's primary language for a person with limited English proficiency, in a timely manner and without unreasonable delay. The act requires a court to provide language access, including translation and interpretation services, to a child, parent, guardian, custodian, or other party in a dependency and neglect case if the person requests language access or has limited English proficiency. The act requires that during a dispositional hearing concerning the best interests of a child, the court consider services and programs that provide the parent and child with language access and effective communication. The act appropriates $74,953 from the judicial stabilization cash fund to the judicial department to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/3/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1034 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning adult competency to stand trial. J. Amabile (D) | M. Bradfield (R) / R. Fields (D) The act reforms and clarifies the criminal competency to proceed process. The act provides necessary parties with access to information related to the defendant's claim of incompetency to proceed. The act adds to the information that is included in a competency report. The act delineates a court's options when it finds that a defendant is incompetent to proceed. The act directs when competency services may be provided on an outpatient basis. The act sets forth the circumstances when a court has to dismiss the defendant's case based on the highest level of charge against the defendant and how long the defendant has been waiting for restoration services. APPROVED by Governor June 4, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE June 4, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE July 1, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/4/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1037 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning reducing the harm caused by substance use disorders. E. Epps (D) | C. deGruy Kennedy (D) / K. Priola (D) The act excludes injuries involving the possession of drugs or drug paraphernalia from a physician's mandatory reporting requirements. The act also adds an exemption to the prohibition on possessing drug paraphernalia for possession of drug paraphernalia that a person received from an approved syringe exchange program or a program carried out by a harm reduction organization while the person was participating in the program. With respect to opioid antagonists, the act: Clarifies that the civil and criminal immunity that protects a person who acts in good faith to furnish or administer an opioid antagonist also protects a person who distributes the opioid antagonist; Specifies that the mere presence of an opioid antagonist is insufficient to establish probable cause to perform a warrantless search or seizure; and Updates the term "opiate antagonist" to "opioid antagonist" in current law. The act specifies that money appropriated to the department of public health and environment to purchase non-laboratory synthetic opioid detection tests may also be used to purchase other drug testing equipment. The act authorizes an organization operating a clean syringe exchange program to: Purchase and distribute other supplies and tools intended to reduce health risks associated with the use of drugs, including smoking materials; and Provide drug testing services through the program. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 6, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1038 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning addressing the high-acuity crisis for children and youth in need of residential care, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. M. Young (D) | B. Bradley (R) / B. Kirkmeyer (R) | R. Fields (D) The act requires the department of health care policy and financing (HCPF), in collaboration with the behavioral health administration (BHA) and the department of human services (CDHS), to develop a system of care (system of care) for children and youth who are less than 21 years of age and who have complex behavioral health needs. At a minimum, the system of care must include: Implementation of a standardized assessment tool; Intensive-care coordination; Expanded supportive services; and Expanded access to treatment foster care. The act requires HCPF to convene a leadership team that is responsible for the decision-making and oversight of the system of care and to convene an implementation team to create a plan to implement the system of care. The act requires CDHS and HCPF to report progress on the development and implementation of the system of care to the general assembly. The act creates the residential child care provider training academy in CDHS to create a pipeline of high-quality staff for residential child care providers and ensure that individuals hired to work at residential child care facilities receive the necessary training to perform the individual's job functions responsibly and effectively. The act requires CDHS to expand the number of treatment beds available for children and youth whose behavioral or mental health needs require services and treatment in a residential child care facility. The act requires CDHS to develop a system to establish and monitor quality standards for residential child care providers and ensure the quality standards are implemented into all levels of care that serve children and youth in out-of-home placement. The act requires CDHS to develop a system to incentivize residential child care providers to implement quality standards above CDHS' established minimum standards. The act requires CDHS to make publicly available on the department's website a directory of each residential child care provider's quality assurance. The CDHS program that provides emergency resources to certain licensed providers to help remove barriers the providers face in serving children and youth whose behavioral or mental health needs require services and treatment in a residential child care facility currently repeals on July 1, 2028. The act extends the program indefinitely and requires CDHS to contract with additional licensed providers for the delivery of services to children and youth who are eligible for and placed in the program. The act requires CDHS and the BHA to increase the minimum reimbursement rates paid to qualified residential treatment programs for the purpose of aligning room and board payments across payer sources. The act requires HCPF to contract with a third-party vendor to complete an actuarial analysis in order to determine the appropriate medicaid reimbursement rate for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. The act requires CDHS to contract with one or more third-party vendors to implement a pilot program to assess the needs of, and provide short-term residential services for, juvenile justice-involved youth who do not meet the criteria for detention. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act appropriates money to the department of human services and the department of health care policy and financing to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 6, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1040 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning a study of the status of gender-affirming health-care providers. S. Vigil (D) | K. McCormick (D) / J. Marchman (D) | F. Winter (D)  Colorado Youth Advisory Council Review Committee. The bill requires the department of public health and environment (department) to conduct or cause to be conducted a gender-affirming health-care provider study (study). The study must determine: The number of gender-affirming health-care providers and facilities in each region, without disclosing identities of providers; The resources available to gender-affirming health-care providers and facilities in the state; Threats to gender-affirming health-care providers; The number of patients seeking gender-affirming health-care services in each region, including the ratio of patients to providers in each region, without disclosing identities of patients or providers; The types of gender-affirming health-care services that patients seek; The prevalence and impact of nonprescribed treatments; and The availability of insurance coverage for different types of treatment. The bill requires the department and any third party that the department contracts with to conduct the study to seek input from specified persons. The department is required to submit a report on or before December 31, 2026, including its findings and recommendations, to specified committees of the general assembly. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  4/2/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1045 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning treatment for substance use disorders, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. R. Armagost (R) | C. deGruy Kennedy (D) / K. Mullica (D) | P. Will (R) The act prohibits an insurance carrier that provides coverage for a drug used to treat a substance use disorder under a health benefit plan from requiring prior authorization for the drug based solely on the dosage amount. The act requires an insurance carrier to reimburse a licensed pharmacist prescribing or administering medication-assisted treatment (MAT) pursuant to a collaborative pharmacy practice agreement (collaborative agreement) at a rate equal to the reimbursement rate for other health-care providers. The act amends the practice of pharmacy to include prescriptive authority for any FDA-approved product indicated for opioid use disorder in accordance with federal law, if authorized through a collaborative agreement. The act requires the state board of pharmacy, the Colorado medical board, and the state board of nursing to develop a protocol for pharmacists to prescribe, dispense, and administer certain FDA-approved products for MAT. The act requires reimbursement to pharmacies of an enhanced dispensing fee for administering injectable antagonist medication for MAT that aligns with the administration fee paid to a provider in a clinical setting. The act requires the medical assistance program to reimburse a pharmacist prescribing or administering medications for opioid use disorder pursuant to a collaborative agreement at a rate equal to the reimbursement rate for other providers. The act authorizes licensed clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, and licensed professional counselors (professionals) within their scope of practice to provide clinical supervision to individuals seeking certification as addiction technicians and addiction specialists, and directs the state board of addiction counselors and the state board of human services, as applicable, to adopt rules relating to clinical supervision by these professionals. Further, a licensed addiction counselor is authorized to provide clinical supervision to individuals seeking licensure as marriage and family therapists or professional counselors if the licensed addiction counselor has met the education requirements for those professions, or the equivalent, as determined by the respective boards regulating those professions. The act expands the medication-assisted treatment expansion pilot program to include grants to provide training and ongoing support to pharmacies and pharmacists who are authorized to prescribe, dispense, and administer MAT pursuant to a collaborative agreement or drug therapy protocol to assist individuals with a substance use disorder. The act requires the department of health care policy and financing (HCPF) to seek federal authorization to provide MAT, case management services, and a 30-day supply of prescription medication to medicaid members upon release from jail or a juvenile institutional facility. The act adds substance use disorder treatment to the list of health-care or mental health-care services that are required to be reimbursed at the same rate for telemedicine as a comparable in-person service. The act requires HCPF to seek federal authorization to provide partial hospitalization for substance use disorder treatment with full federal financial participation. The act requires each managed care entity (MCE) that provides prescription drug benefits or methadone administration for the treatment of substance use disorders to: Set the reimbursement rate for take-home methadone treatment and office-administered methadone treatment at the same rate; and Not impose any prior authorization requirements on any prescription medication approved by the FDA for the treatment of substance use disorders, regardless of the dosage amount. The act requires the behavioral health administration (BHA) to collect data from each withdrawal management facility on the total number of individuals who were denied admittance or treatment for withdrawal management and the reason for the denial and to review and approve any admission criteria established by a withdrawal management facility. The act requires each MCE to disclose the aggregated average and lowest rates of reimbursement for a set of behavioral health services determined by HCPF and authorizes behavioral health providers to disclose reimbursement rates paid by an MCE to the behavioral health provider. Beginning in the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $150,000 from the general fund to the Colorado child abuse prevention trust fund (trust fund) for programs to reduce the occurrence of prenatal substance exposure. For the 2024-25 and 2025-26 state fiscal years, the act also annually appropriates $50,000 from the general fund to the trust fund to convene a stakeholder group to identify strategies to increase access to child care for families seeking substance use disorder treatment and recovery services. The act requires the BHA to contract with an independent third-party entity to provide services and supports to behavioral health providers seeking to become a behavioral health safety net provider with the goal of the provider becoming self-sustaining. The act creates the contingency management grant program in the BHA to provide grants to substance use disorder treatment programs that implement a contingency management program for individuals with a stimulant use disorder. The act authorizes the BHA to apply for federal funding for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder programs and to receive and disburse federal funds to public and private nonprofit organizations. The act extends the opioid and other substance use disorders study committee until September 1, 2026. The act appropriates money to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE July 1, 2025(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1049 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the creation of a loan repayment program for licensed school mental health professionals practicing in Colorado schools. R. Weinberg (R) | S. Vigil (D) / J. Marchman (D) | F. Winter (D)  Colorado Youth Advisory Council Review Committee. The bill creates the licensed school mental health professional loan repayment program (program) in the department of higher education. The purpose of the program is to provide loan repayment of up to $10,000 to eligible school counselors, school psychologists, and school social workers who provide mental health services to students who have limited access to mental health services. The commission on higher education (commission) administers the program. The bill creates in the state treasury the licensed school mental health professional loan repayment program fund. The bill requires that the commission submit an annual report to the education committees of the house of representatives and the senate on or before October 31 of each year the program is operational. The program repeals on July 1, 2029. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/15/2024 House Committee on Education Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1054 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning implementation of jail standards in Colorado, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. J. Amabile (D) | L. Garcia (D) / R. Fields (D) | J. Coleman (D) There is currently a jail standards oversight committee and commission (oversight committee and commission) tasked with developing jail standards in Colorado. The oversight committee and commission are set to repeal on July 1, 2024. The act repeals the commission and extends the oversight committee until September 1, 2033. Each county jail shall comply with the standards adopted by the oversight committee beginning July 1, 2026. The oversight committee shall post the standards on its website. If the oversight committee revises a jail standard, each county jail shall comply with the revised standard no later than one year after the revision is adopted, or earlier if specified by the oversight committee when adopting the revision. The act creates a jail standards advisory committee (advisory committee). The advisory committee consists of: 2 sheriffs appointed by a statewide organization representing the county sheriffs of Colorado; 2 county commissioners appointed by Colorado counties, incorporated; The state public defender or the state public defender's designee; One physical or behavioral health professional with experience working in a jail, appointed by the oversight committee; and One person representing a statewide organization that advocates on behalf of people experiencing incarceration, appointed by the oversight committee. The advisory committee shall begin meeting in July 2024 and shall plan assessments of jails to begin in January 2025. Additional duties of the advisory committee include, but are not limited to: Utilize peer assessors selected by the advisory committee to perform assessments of a jail's physical facilities and its written policies and procedures to assess compliance with jail standards; Provide the oversight committee with recommendations for revising jail standards and ways to address jail needs necessary to comply with jail standards; and Provide the oversight committee with recommendations to address jail needs necessary to comply with jail standards. The advisory committee may also establish a process to grant variances from the jail standards to local jails. The act creates the jail standards advisory committee cash fund to fund the activities of the advisory committee. The act requires the attorney general to conduct assessments of jails, in conjunction with the advisory committee, for compliance with jail standards. The attorney general may also conduct an independent special assessment of a jail when requested by the governor, the oversight committee, or a sheriff. The attorney general shall prepare a report of each special assessment. The advisory committee shall annually submit a report to the oversight committee. The act requires the division of criminal justice in the department of public safety to create a list of funding assistance available to jails to offset the costs of compliance with the jail standards. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act appropriates: $305,000 from the general fund to the jail standards advisory committee cash fund; $41,248 from the general fund to the legislative department; and $12,532 from the general fund to the department of law. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 3, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/3/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1063 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning addressing the effect of abbreviated school days on children with disabilities in public schools, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. M. Young (D) | L. Garcia (D) / C. Kolker (D) | B. Kirkmeyer (R) The act clarifies what constitutes an abbreviated school day and describes the effects of placing children with disabilities on abbreviated school day schedules (abbreviated schedule). The act requires the department of education (department) to create and implement a policy that explains the: Definition of an abbreviated school day, including how the definition applies to attendance and school discipline; Circumstances in which abbreviated schedules are permissible and impermissible; Roles of the teams who determine whether to assign children with disabilities to abbreviated schedules; Extent to which children with disabilities may participate in field trips, school functions, and extracurricular activities; Documentation and maintenance of records relating to children with disabilities' abbreviated schedules; Review of abbreviated schedules on a regular basis by the teams who determine whether to assign children with disabilities to abbreviated schedules; Information that parents, legal guardians, or custodians of children with disabilities (parents) must receive regarding whether parents may consent to, revoke consent to, or oppose abbreviated schedules; and Procedural safeguard information distributed to parents prior to meetings in which abbreviated schedules are discussed. Each administrative unit shall adopt the department's policy and create a plan to support children with disabilities who are assigned an abbreviated schedule. The plan must include the outcomes for placing children with disabilities on an abbreviated schedule and a description of the stages for gradual reintroduction to return children with disabilities to full-time school day schedules. The department shall provide annual training and ongoing technical assistance to administrative units. On or before July 1, 2026, and each July 1 thereafter, a school district, a district charter school, an institute charter school, or a board of cooperative services shall submit a report to the department summarizing: The number of children with disabilities who were placed on abbreviated schedules during the preceding school year; The number of days and the percentage of the school year that each child with disabilities was placed on an abbreviated schedule; The student demographic information for each child with disabilities placed on an abbreviated school day schedule, including race, gender, English language learner status, and whether the child has a disability pursuant to federal law, to the extent possible while maintaining student privacy; and The student demographic data collected, disaggregated by race, gender, English language learner status, and disability status pursuant to federal law, to the extent possible while maintaining student privacy. The act requires the department to post the reports to the department's website on an annual basis. Beginning in January 2027, and in January every year thereafter, the department shall include as part of its presentation during its "SMART Act" hearing information concerning abbreviated schedules. By the beginning of the 2025-26 school year, the department shall standardize the reporting method that schools of a school district, district charter schools, school districts, institute charter schools, and the state charter school institute use to collect and report data concerning: Instructional hours; School calendars; and The number of hours students spend on instructional time during the school year. Beginning in the 2025-26 school year, and each school year thereafter, the department shall collect from schools of a school district, district charter schools, school districts, institute charter schools, and the state charter school institute, at a minimum, the following data: Days of instruction for elementary and secondary schools; Instructional hours for elementary and secondary schools; Estimated non-instructional hours, school closures, snow days, and time spent on lunch and passing between classes; and The number of days and percentage of the school year students were placed on abbreviated schedules. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, $250,108 is appropriated to the department from the general fund to implement this act. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 5, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/5/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1066 (2024 Session)Strongly Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning methods to prevent workplace violence in certain health-care settings. E. Hamrick (D) | L. Garcia (D) / D. Michaelson Jenet (D) | J. Gonzales (D)  The bill enacts the "Violence Prevention in Health-care Settings Act", applicable to hospitals, freestanding emergency departments, nursing care facilities, assisted living residences, and federally qualified health centers, and the "Violence Prevention in Behavioral Health Settings Act", applicable to comprehensive community behavioral health providers. Both acts require each of these facility types to: Establish a workplace violence prevention committee to document and review workplace violence incidents at the facility and develop and regularly review a workplace violence prevention plan (plan) for the facility; Adopt, implement, enforce, and update the plan; Provide training on the plan and on workplace violence prevention; Submit biannual workplace violence incident reports to the department of public health and environment or the behavioral health administration, as applicable; and If a workplace violence incident occurs, offer post-incident services to affected staff. The bill specifies the required components of facility plans. Facilities are prohibited from discouraging staff from contacting or filing an incident report with law enforcement. The bill also prohibits retaliation, discipline, or discrimination against a person who reports a workplace violence incident in good faith, who advises a staff member of the right to report an incident, or who chooses not to report an incident. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  5/14/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed
HB24-1067 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning ballot access for candidates with disabilities. D. Ortiz (D) / F. Winter (D) | L. Liston (R)  The bill requires the general assembly, the secretary of state, and each political party to ensure that the caucus process or any future alternative process by which candidates may access the ballot that is accessible to persons with disabilities remains an option in the state. The bill specifies that the petition process is not a means of ballot access that is accessible to persons with disabilities. In addition, the bill requires that, within 6 months of the effective date of the bill, any person, upon request, must be able to participate in a precinct caucus or a party assembly with the use of a video conferencing platform that is accessible to persons with disabilities unless the precinct caucus or party assembly is held in a geographic location that lacks broadband internet service. When a precinct caucus or party assembly occurs in a geographic location that lacks broadband internet service, participation must be allowed by an alternative means such as a telephone conference. Any alternative means used by a political party must be accessible to persons with disabilities. The failure of a political party to make a reasonable effort to comply with the requirements in the bill constitutes discrimination on the basis of disability in violation of current law. Action taken pursuant to the bill does not limit or preclude any other available legal remedy. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  4/4/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1071 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning permitting a name change for a person convicted of a felony to conform with the person's gender identity. L. Garcia (D) / D. Michaelson Jenet (D) | K. Priola (D) Current law specifies the conditions a person must meet in order to change the person's name if the person was convicted of a felony. Among those conditions is that the person must show good cause to be able to change the person's name to a name different from the name the person was convicted under. The act states that good cause includes changing the petitioner's name to conform with the petitioner's gender identity. The act authorizes the court to require a petitioner to give public notice of a name change if the name change was requested by a petitioner with a felony conviction and is for the purpose of changing the petitioner's name to conform with the petitioner's gender identity. APPROVED by Governor April 19, 2024 EFFECTIVE April 19, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/19/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1072 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning increased evidentiary requirements in criminal proceedings for protection of victims of sexual assaults. S. Bird (D) | L. Frizell (R) / B. Kirkmeyer (R) | R. Fields (D) Under current law, certain evidence of a victim's or witness's prior or subsequent sexual conduct is presumed irrelevant, but there is an exception for evidence of the victim's or witness's prior or subsequent sexual conduct with the defendant. The act eliminates this exception. The act expands the criminal rape shield law to prohibit the admission of evidence of the victim's manner of dress or hairstyle as evidence of the victim's consent. The act amends what a moving party must show to the court and to opposing parties and what the court must find in order to introduce evidence that is presumed to be irrelevant under the criminal rape shield law. Under current law, a defendant may move to introduce evidence that the victim or a witness has a history of false reporting of sexual assaults, upon a sufficient showing to the court and opposing parties. The act allows the defendant to offer evidence concerning at least one incident of false reporting of unlawful sexual behavior and also articulate facts that would, by a preponderance of the evidence, demonstrate that the victim or witness has made a report that was demonstrably false or false in fact. APPROVED by Governor April 24, 2024 EFFECTIVE July 1, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/24/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1075 (2024 Session)Support Wednesday, May 8 2024
SPECIAL ORDERS - SECOND READING OF BILLS
(2) in senate calendar.  
Concerning consideration of a statewide universal health-care payment system, and, in connection therewith, creating an analysis collaborative for the purpose of advising the Colorado school of public health in conducting an analysis of draft model legislation concerning a statewide universal health-care payment system and making an appropriation. K. McCormick (D) | A. Boesenecker (D) / J. Marchman (D) | S. Jaquez Lewis (D)  The bill requires the Colorado school of public health to analyze draft model legislation for implementing a single-payer, nonprofit, publicly financed, and privately delivered universal health-care payment system for Colorado that directly compensates providers. The Colorado school of public health must submit a report detailing its findings to the general assembly by October 1, 2025 December 31, 2025 . The bill also creates the statewide health-care analysis advisory task force collaborative ("analysis collaborative") consisting of 21 members appointed 20 members invited by the general assembly and the governor executive director of the department of health care policy and financing, four members of the general assembly appointed by the president of the senate, minority leader of the senate, speaker of the house of representatives, and the minority leader of the house of representatives , as well as executive directors of specified state departments, the commissioner of insurance, and the chief executive officer of the Colorado health benefit exchange or any designees of the executive directors, the commissioner, and the chief executive officer. The advisory task force analysis collaborative is created for the purpose of advising the Colorado school of public health during the analysis. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  5/7/2024 Senate Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over to 05/08/2024 - No Amendments
HB24-1079 (2024 Session)Strongly Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning persons detained in jail who are held on an emergency commitment, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. J. Amabile (D) | R. English (D) / R. Fields (D) The act prohibits a law enforcement officer or emergency service patrol officer who takes a juvenile into protective custody from detaining the juvenile in jail. Beginning July 1, 2024, the act requires each local law enforcement agency that has taken a person into protective custody to provide an annual report to the behavioral health administration that includes disaggregated and nonidentifying information concerning persons who were taken into protective custody in an approved treatment facility or detained in an emergency medical facility or jail. Beginning July 1, 2024, the act requires each approved treatment facility or emergency medical services facility that detains a person under protective custody or detains or holds a person on an emergency commitment to provide a quarterly report to the behavioral health administration that includes information about the persons detained or held at the facility. The act appropriates $64,738 from the general fund to the department of human services for use by the behavioral health administration. APPROVED by Governor May 17, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 17, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/17/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1081 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning regulation on the sale of sodium nitrite. J. Amabile (D) | M. Catlin (R) / D. Roberts (D) | B. Pelton (R) The act limits the sale or transfer of a product containing sodium nitrite in a concentration greater than 10% of the mass or volume of the product (covered product) to commercial businesses that are verified to require a covered product. The act requires covered products to meet specified labeling requirements. A person who violates the requirements of the act is subject to a civil penalty of $10,000 for a first offense and up to $1,000,000 for a second or subsequent violation. The attorney general or an aggrieved individual may bring a civil action to enforce the act and, if an aggrieved individual prevails in a civil action, the aggrieved individual is entitled to the greater of actual economic damages or $3,000, attorney fees, and costs. APPROVED by Governor April 17, 2024 EFFECTIVE July 1, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/17/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1086 (2024 Session)Oppose NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the operation of the Denver health and hospital authority. R. Holtorf (R) | J. Amabile (D) / D. Michaelson Jenet (D) Current law requires the department of health care policy and financing (department) to offer to enter into a direct contract with the managed care organization (MCO) operated by or under the control of the Denver health and hospital authority (Denver health) until Denver health ceases to operate a medicaid managed care program or until June 30, 2025. The act removes the option for the department to enter into a direct contract until June 30, 2025, and instead requires the department to enter into the contract from July 1, 2025, until June 30, 2032, as long as the MCO meets all MCO criteria required by the department. If the department designates a managed care entity (MCE) other than the MCO operated by Denver health to manage behavioral health-care services, the act requires Denver health to collaborate with the MCE during the term of the contract. The act prohibits the MCO from reimbursing contracted medicaid providers at rates that are higher than the department's medicaid fee for service rates unless the provider enters into a quality incentive agreement with the MCO. For the 2023-24 state fiscal year, the department distributed money appropriated for a supplemental state payment to Denver health. The act authorizes the department to continually distribute any money appropriated for payment to Denver health. APPROVED by Governor April 4, 2024 EFFECTIVE April 4, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/4/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1096 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the enactment of the "School Psychologists Licensure Interstate Compact". M. Young (D) | M. Lukens (D) / C. Kolker (D) | J. Marchman (D) The act enacts the "School Psychologists Licensure Interstate Compact" (compact). The purpose of the compact is to facilitate the interstate practice of school psychology in educational or school settings, thereby improving the availability of school psychological services (services) to the public. The compact establishes a pathway to allow school psychologists to obtain equivalent licenses to provide services in any state that is a member of the compact (member state). The compact outlines the requirements for a school psychologist to obtain and maintain an equivalent license in another member state. Provisions for active military members and their spouses are made. The compact takes effect on the date it is enacted into law in the seventh compact state. The executive director of the department of education shall notify the revisor of statutes in writing when the seventh compact state has enacted the compact into law by e-mailing notice to the revisor of statutes. APPROVED by Governor April 29, 2024 EFFECTIVE April 29, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/29/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1098 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning protections for residential tenants, and, in connection therewith, requiring cause for the eviction of a residential tenant. J. Mabrey (D) | M. Duran (D) / J. Gonzales (D) | N. Hinrichsen (D) With certain exceptions, the act prohibits a landlord from evicting a residential tenant unless the landlord has cause for eviction. Cause exists only when: A tenant or lessee is guilty of an unlawful detention of real property under certain circumstances described in existing law, as amended by the act; A tenant or lessee engages in conduct that creates a nuisance or disturbance that interferes with the quiet enjoyment of the landlord or other tenants at the property or an immediately adjacent property, or where the tenant negligently damaged the property; or Conditions exist constituting grounds for a "no-fault eviction". The following conditions constitute grounds for a "no-fault eviction" of a residential tenant, with certain limitations: Demolition or conversion of the residential premises; Substantial repairs or renovations to the residential premises; Occupancy of the residential premises is assumed by the landlord or a family member of the landlord; Withdrawal of the residential premises from the rental market for the purpose of selling the residential premises; A tenant refuses to sign a new lease with reasonable terms; and A tenant has a history of nonpayment of rent. If a landlord proceeds with an eviction of a tenant without cause, the tenant may seek relief as provided in existing laws concerning unlawful removal of a tenant and may assert the landlord's violation as an affirmative defense to an eviction proceeding. Current law allows a tenant to terminate a tenancy by serving written notice to the landlord within a prescribed time period, based on the length of the tenancy. For the purpose of such notices, certain provisions apply, including the following: Any person in possession of real property with the assent of the owner is presumed to be a tenant at will until the contrary is shown; and Certain provisions concerning notices to quit do not apply to the termination of a residential tenancy if the residential premises is a condominium unit. The act eliminates these provisions. Current law requires the management of a mobile home park to make a reasonable effort to notify a resident of the management's intention to enter the mobile home space at least 48 hours before entry. The act increases this notice period to 72 hours. APPROVED by Governor April 19, 2024 EFFECTIVE April 19, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/19/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1101 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning empowering victims by enhancing access to restorative justice in criminal cases. J. Mabrey (D) | M. Snyder (D)  The bill makes changes to increase access to restorative justice practices (restorative justice) in Colorado, specifically by: Creating a victim-survivor right to participate in restorative justice in the criminal and juvenile justice systems; Requiring that victim-survivors be informed of their statutory right to restorative justice and how to exercise it; Creating a victim-survivor right to request restorative justice as an alternative to, or in addition to, prosecution; Establishing the victim-survivor's right to accept or decline participation in restorative justice, and the right to change that decision, at any stage in the proceedings; Creating a victim-survivor right to restorative justice with trained facilitators who adhere to the Colorado restorative justice coordinating council's code of conduct and standards of training and practice, as amended; Requiring that, in cases of domestic violence or unlawful sexual behavior, when a victim-survivor requests restorative justice, the victim-survivor has a right to restorative justice with a facilitator who has specialized training and experience to address the issues specific to those cases; Requiring that participation in restorative justice by a responsible party is voluntary; Mandating that restorative justice is confidential and information obtained through a restorative justice practice must not be disclosed by any party to the practice without the agreement of all parties involved; Requiring the state restorative justice coordinating council to develop, on or before August 30, 2024, 2 standardized forms to advise victim-survivors of their right to restorative justice in criminal and juvenile cases and a confidentiality agreement to use in restorative justice; Clarifying that the legal authority of a prosecutor to make decisions about prosecution is preserved; Creating a funding source for restorative justice through the offender services fund; Eliminating language in statute that prohibits the use of restorative justice in cases involving domestic partner violence, protective orders, stalking, and unlawful sexual behavior; Requiring the department of corrections to accommodate victim-survivor requests for victim-offender dialogues; maintain an accountability letter bank for inmates to send letters of accountability, apology, or remorse to victim-survivors; inform victim-survivors of the availability of such letters; and adopt policies requiring adherence to the principles of victim empowerment; and Eliminating outdated language related to fees for restorative justice in multiple statutes.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  4/2/2024 House Committee on Judiciary Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1103 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning prohibitions on the official use of the term "excited delirium". J. Amabile (D) | L. Herod (D) / J. Gonzales (D) | J. Buckner (D) The act prohibits training for law enforcement personnel, emergency medical service providers, or other first responders from including the term "excited delirium"; except that in an emergency medical service provider training the term may be used in teaching the history of the term. A peace officer is prohibited from using the term "excited delirium" to describe a person in an incident report. A coroner or other person authorized to determine a cause of death shall not register "excited delirium" as the cause of death on a death certificate. APPROVED by Governor April 4, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/4/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1113 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning credit for the deductible amount paid by a covered person when a health insurance carrier becomes insolvent. K. Brown (D) | A. Boesenecker (D) / D. Roberts (D)  For small group and individual health benefit plans, if an individual who is entitled to receive benefits or services under a health benefit plan has incurred any out-of-pocket expenses, including payments for a deductible or other coinsurance amount, under the health benefit plan during a plan year, and the individual's health insurance carrier exits the health insurance market and can no longer provide coverage to the individual, the bill requires the individual's new health insurance carrier to credit all of the out-of-pocket expenses paid by the individual in accordance with the original health benefit plan in the given plan year to the new health benefit plan if the individual enrolls in the new health benefit plan in the established special enrollment period. The bill grants rule-making authority to the commissioner of insurance. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/14/2024 House Committee on Health & Human Services Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1126 (2024 Session)Oppose NOT ON CALENDARConcerning requiring participation in a treatment plan for a substance use disorder as a condition of bond. M. Lynch (R) / B. Pelton (R)  The bill permits a court to order a person to complete a medical evaluation if the court suspects a substance use disorder contributed to the behavior giving rise to an offense for which the person was charged. The medical evaluation must determine if the person would benefit from a medically guided treatment plan for a substance use disorder (treatment plan). If the court receives a recommendation following the medical evaluation that the person would benefit from a treatment plan, the court may order the person to participate in a treatment plan as a condition of bond. The person's treatment provider shall submit a report to the court within 2 business days after each scheduled appointment that is part of the person's treatment plan to indicate whether the person is in compliance with the treatment plan. The bill requires a person ordered to participate in a treatment plan to waive any patient privilege necessary for a doctor or treatment provider to report to the court. The bill prohibits the court from ordering a person required to participate in a treatment plan as a condition of bond to submit to drug or alcohol monitoring other than monitoring required by the treatment plan unless the monitoring is expressly required or permitted pursuant to any other state law. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/27/2024 House Committee on Judiciary Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1127 (2024 Session)Oppose NOT ON CALENDARConcerning parole eligibility for an offender convicted of certain violent crimes. M. Lynch (R) / M. Baisley (R) | P. Will (R)  Under existing law, an offender convicted of certain violent offenses is eligible for parole after the person has served 75% of the sentence imposed upon the offender, less earned time granted by the department of corrections. The bill requires an offender sentenced for second degree murder; first degree assault; first degree kidnapping, unless the first degree kidnapping is a class 1 felony; sexual assault; first degree arson; first degree burglary; or aggravated robbery committed on or after July 1, 2024, to serve at least 85% of the imposed sentence before the offender is eligible for parole. The bill requires an offender sentenced for the enumerated crimes committed on or after July 1, 2024, to serve 100% of the sentence imposed if the person has twice previously been convicted of a crime of violence.(Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/14/2024 House Committee on Judiciary Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1136 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning measures to encourage healthier social media use by youth, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. R. Pugliese (R) | J. Amabile (D) / L. Cutter (D) | J. Smallwood (R) The act requires the department of education (department) to create and maintain a resource bank of evidence-based, research-based, scholarly articles and promising program materials and curricula pertaining to the mental and physical health impacts of social media use by youth, internet safety, and cybersecurity. The resource bank will be used in elementary and secondary schools in the state. The department is required to convene a temporary stakeholder group of no more than 15 persons to assist in the creation of the resource bank. The resource materials must be made available free of charge no later than July 1, 2025, to local education providers, professional educators, parents or guardians of youth, students, and community providers. The act strongly encourages the department to expand local student wellness programs to include programs that address the impacts of problematic technology use on the mental and physical well-being of Colorado youth. On or after January 1, 2026, the act requires a social media platform, as defined by the act, to establish a function that provides a user who is under the age of 18 with information about social media that helps the user understand the impact of social media use on the developing brain and the mental and physical health of youth or displays a notification every 30 minutes when the user: Has spent one hour on social media platforms in a 24-hour period; or Is on a social media platform between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. The chief information officer in the Colorado office of information technology, in consultation with the director of the center for health and environmental data division of the Colorado department of public health and environment and the temporary stakeholder group shall establish standards for the function. The act appropriates $13,974 from the general fund to the department of education for use by the student learning division to implement the bill. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1146 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning authorizing the department of health care policy and financing to suspend a provider's enrollment if the provider is participating in an organized fraud scheme. S. Bird (D) | R. Taggart (R) / J. Bridges (D) | R. Zenzinger (D) The act authorizes the department of health care policy and financing (state department) to suspend the enrollment of a medicaid and children's basic health plan (programs) provider only if the state department identifies that the provider is participating in an alleged and ongoing organized crime or organized fraud scheme (scheme) that impacts the programs and if the state department documents in writing that at least 3 of the following factors are met: The provider has been enrolled in the programs for less than 3 years; At least 3 providers are involved in the scheme; The collective billing amount identified in the scheme exceeds $1 million; The provider's billing indicates a pattern of abuse or noncompliance; The volume of claims or billing amount has increased at a significant rate and there is no other reasonable explanation for the increase; The federal centers for medicare and medicaid services has approved a provider enrollment moratorium for the provider type involved in the scheme; or The state department has notified law enforcement of the scheme. The state department is required to notify the provider of the suspension in writing, including the reasons for the suspension. The state department may suspend a provider's enrollment for an initial period of 6 months while the state department conducts a review of the scheme. After the state department's review is complete, the state department must reinstate the provider's enrollment if the department determines the provider did not engage in a scheme. If the state department's review cannot be completed during the initial 6-month period, the state department may extend the review period in additional 6-month increments if the state department documents in writing the necessity for extending the review. APPROVED by Governor February 20, 2024 EFFECTIVE February 20, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  2/20/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1167 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning measures to prohibit student seclusion. R. English (D) | J. Bacon (D)  The bill prohibits the use of seclusion on a student of a school district, district charter school, or institute charter school on certain property or while the student is participating in an off-campus, school-sponsored activity or event. The bill requires the state board of education (state board) to promulgate or amend existing rules to reflect the prohibited use of seclusion. The bill requires the state board to create and maintain a resource bank of materials regarding alternatives to seclusion and restraints for schools and school personnel to employ. The bill amends existing reporting requirements to ensure incidents of seclusion are reported. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  4/25/2024 House Committee on Education Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1216 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning multi-level supports for youth in varying stages of the juvenile justice system, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. J. Bacon (D) | T. Hernandez (D) / J. Coleman (D) The act establishes a bill of rights for a K-12 student who is involved in any capacity with the juvenile or criminal justice system (justice-engaged student). School districts, boards of cooperative services, charter schools, and institute charter schools (local education providers) must follow the bill of rights for justice-engaged students. The bill of rights includes, but is not limited to: Providing the justice-engaged student with alternative solutions to a general education, when appropriate; Prompt enrollment or re-enrollment no later than 10 business days after the first request to the local education provider, so long as the student is eligible for enrollment, as determined by the local education provider; Appropriate credit for coursework completed while justice-engaged, and for that coursework to be applied toward graduation or school continuation; Providing the justice-engaged student with a graduation plan, developed in consultation with the justice-engaged student, the student's family, caregiver or advocate; Privacy, including privacy when related to diversion, probation, or questioning about a crime; Protection by the federal "Individuals with Disabilities Act", section 504 of the federal "Rehabilitation Act of 1973", applicable foster care regulations, and the federal "McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act"; Creating evidence of and being evaluated for giftedness; and Allowing the justice-engaged student to participate in school activities or career readiness pathways in accordance with rules promulgated by the state board of education (board). Each local education provider shall publish on its website an explanation of the services and resources available for justice-engaged students, including the name, phone number, and email address of a designated, trained point-of-contact person (contact person) at the local education provider. For small and rural school districts that are not members of a BOCES, a designated support person within the department of education (department) may act as a contact person. The contact person shall read and understand the guidance developed by the department and be knowledgeable about alternative education options and wraparound services. Upon notification or request, a local education provider will work with the team of professionals, including the multi-tiered systems of supports, and appropriate intervention teams, families, and justice-engaged students to ensure a pathway to graduation, including workforce development opportunities, access to alternative educational programming, and mental health and other supports as and if appropriate and available. On or before July 1, 2024, the department shall convene an interagency working group to review and make recommendations to the department and joint education committees of the house of representatives and the senate no later than December 1, 2024 regarding justice-engaged students. The board shall promulgate rules to establish a process and framework for interpreting and transferring credits and schoolwork completed by a justice-engaged student while in custody. Local education providers retain the right to suspend or expel a justice-engaged student pursuant to applicable laws. The department shall provide guidance to local education providers on how to allow a justice-engaged student to receive an accommodation to participate in school activities, including, but not limited to, graduation ceremonies, sporting events, after-school activities, and college or career readiness pathways. On or before September 1, 2026, the act requires the department to select and contract with an entity to establish and maintain a statewide hotline for justice-engaged students, families and caregivers, justice system personnel, and education personnel. Each justice-engaged student shall be provided information about the hotline by law enforcement after ticketing or arrest, by the division of youth services after release from the division, and by local education providers after notification that a student has become justice-engaged. The act requires the entity operating the hotline to submit a written report to the department and board on or before June 30, 2025, and each June 30 thereafter. The report must categorize and summarize the number of calls received, the type of person calling, types of supports or referrals provided, and the geography of calls received so that service gaps can be identified. Beginning July 1, 2025, the department shall assist students from small and rural school districts who have been denied re-entry into school by a local education provider. Under current law, if a child or youth is within a court's jurisdiction, a preliminary investigation is made to determine whether further actions be taken to protect the interests of the child or youth or the community. The court or judge or magistrate is encouraged to take into consideration a juvenile's educational progress and ability to achieve credits toward graduation when considering release options. If the court commits a justice-engaged student to the department of human services who does not include a physical threat or bodily injury to another person, the court is encouraged to order that the commitment take place in a manner that allows the justice-engaged student to continue to attend school prior to commitment to avoid disruption of the justice-engaged student's academic progress and ability to achieve credits for a semester. The act appropriates $82,883 from the general fund for the 2024-25 state fiscal year to the department of education for use by student pathways. APPROVED by Governor May 31, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/31/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1217 (2024 Session)Strongly Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the dissemination of patient health-care information, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. J. Amabile (D) | N. Ricks (D) / K. Mullica (D) The office of e-health innovation in the governor's office is required to convene a working group to determine the feasibility of creating a centralized digital consent repository that allows patients to provide, extend, deny, and revoke consent for sharing their medical data and information between physical and behavioral health-care providers, family members, community organizations, payers, and state agencies at any time. By January 1, 2026, the working group is required to submit a report including recommendations regarding the feasibility of creating the centralized digital consent repository to specified committees of the general assembly. On or before July 1, 2025, the behavioral health administration in the department of human services (department) is required to create a friends and family input form to allow an individual to provide a treating professional or a licensed or designated facility or organization with information related to a patient receiving mental health or substance use services. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, $50,604 is appropriated to the department to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor May 28, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 28, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/28/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1223 (2024 Session)Support Wednesday, May 8 2024
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(2) in senate calendar.  
Concerning the improvement of programs that benefit working families, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. J. Willford (D) | L. Garcia (D) / L. Cutter (D) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) The act overhauls the Colorado child care assistance program (CCCAP). The act simplifies the application process by: Limiting the application requirements to only what is necessary to determine eligibility; Prohibiting counties from adding eligibility requirements; and Requiring recipients to provide only information that has changed when applying for redetermination. Income qualifications are changed to correspond with universal preschool program requirements. A county may exclude state and federal assistance program income eligibility guidelines in eligibility determinations. An employee of a child care provider may apply to the CCCAP and be granted full benefits for children from 6 weeks of age to 13 years of age, regardless of the employee's income. The act directs that child care providers be paid based on enrollment and not on attendance and be paid a weekly rate in advance. Employers are permitted to cover copayments, and copayments are limited to 7% of a family's income. The act authorizes grants and contracts for underserved populations. Starting July 1, 2025, the department shall create a pilot program for unlicensed providers to seek license-exempt status and establishment as an eligible CCCAP provider separate and distinct from the parent-initiated process. A CCCAP recipient is required to engage in an eligible activity to receive benefits. The act includes substance use disorder treatment programs, job training, and education activities as eligible activities. The department of early childhood education, in consultation with the department of public health and environment, shall conduct or contract for a study to determine the feasibility of de-linking eligibility for the federal child and adult care food program from the CCCAP. The act appropriates $100,000 from the general fund to the department of early childhood for the child and adult care food program study. APPROVED by Governor June 4, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 4, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/4/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1229 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning presumptive eligibility for persons in need of long-term services and supports. R. English (D) / K. Mullica (D) | P. Will (R) Beginning January 1, 2026, the act removes the requirement that the department of health care policy and financing (department) fully assess a person in need of long-term services and supports for the appropriate level of care before the person is presumed eligible for the medical assistance program. The act authorizes the department to make any necessary changes to any other federal authorizations that are authorized by the federal centers for medicare and medicaid services in order to implement the presumptive eligibility requirements for persons in need of long-term services and supports. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE January 1, 2026(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/3/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1252 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the continuation of the suicide prevention commission. S. Vigil (D) | M. Bradfield (R) / D. Michaelson Jenet (D) The suicide prevention commission (commission) created in the department of public health and environment is scheduled to repeal on September 1, 2024. The act continues the commission until September 1, 2034. The act also adjusts the appointments to the commission and limits the number of members from the current 26 to 22. APPROVED by Governor May 31, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/31/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1280 (2024 Session)Support Wednesday, May 8 2024
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE - CONT'D
(7) in senate calendar.  
Concerning the creation of a grant program for community-based organizations to provide appropriate services for migrants who are within one year of arrival in the United States, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. E. Velasco (D) | L. Garcia (D) / R. Fields (D) | L. Cutter (D) The act creates the statewide welcome, reception, and integration grant program (grant program) in the department of labor and employment (department) to provide grants to community-based organizations that provide culturally and linguistically appropriate navigation of services and programs to migrants who are within one year of arrival in the United States. A grant may be used for: Conducting an intake and assessment of needs; Providing cultural orientation; case management; employment services or referrals to employment services; housing, housing-related services, or referrals to housing; English as a second language classes or referrals to classes; financial orientation; referrals to mental and physical health services and disability services; interpretation and translation services; transportation services; and immigration legal assistance or referrals to immigration legal services; Distributing emergency and transitional supplies; Assisting migrant parents to enroll their children in public school or summer programs, including early childhood programs; and Other eligible expenses. The act requires the department to issue a request for proposal for a nonprofit organization to administer the grant program. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $2.5 million from the general fund to the department for the grant program. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/5/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1285 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning preventing bullying in public schools based on student physical appearance. E. Hamrick (D) / J. Marchman (D) | B. Gardner (R) Current law identifies bullying behaviors that are subject to school district and charter school discipline policies and reporting requirements. The act adds a pattern of bullying based on a student's weight, height, or body size to the prohibited bullying behaviors. APPROVED by Governor June 4, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/4/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1286 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning measures to increase access to the courts for indigent persons. J. Joseph (D) | M. Lindsay (D) / D. Roberts (D) | K. Priola (D) The act creates the equal justice authority as a special purpose authority to distribute an equal justice fee for the purpose of providing monetary support to local organizations that provide legal representation and legal advice to low-income individuals. The equal justice authority is governed by the equal justice authority board, which is created in the act. The act requires certain court filings to incur the equal justice filing fee, which must be collected by the court and transmitted to the equal justice authority. The equal justice authority must deposit the money collected from the filing fee into an account maintained by a financial institution and distribute the money, beginning July 1, 2025, and each July 1 thereafter, to local organizations that provide legal representation and legal advice to low-income individuals. On or before January 1, 2026, and each January 1 thereafter, the equal justice authority must prepare and submit a report to the house of representatives judiciary committee and the senate judiciary committee that details the use of the equal justice fees. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 3, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/3/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1292 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning prohibitions on certain firearms used in public mass shootings. T. Hernandez (D) | E. Epps (D) / J. Gonzales (D)  The bill defines the term "assault weapon" and prohibits a person from manufacturing, importing, purchasing, selling, offering to sell, or transferring ownership of an assault weapon. The bill further prohibits a person from possessing a rapid-fire trigger activator. A person in violation of the prohibitions will be assessed a first-time penalty of $250,000 and $500,000 for each subsequent violation. The bill prohibits the sale or transfer by an individual on or after July 1, 2024, to anyone within the state, except to: An heir by bequest or intestate succession; or A licensed gun or firearms dealer, who shall render the weapon inoperable within ninety days of the transfer. An individual or entity that does not have a permit to sell firearms but sells or attempts to make a private sale of an assault weapon or rapid-fire trigger activator in violation of the requirements of the bill on or after July 1, 2025, shall be assessed a civil penalty in the amount of $750. A licensed gun dealer, licensed firearms dealer, gun show vendor, or other person who has a permit to sell firearms who sells or attempts to sell an assault weapon or rapid-fire trigger activator in violation of the requirements of the bill on or after July 1, 2025, shall be reported to the department of revenue. The department of revenue shall take appropriate actions as required by law. A licensed gun dealer, licensed firearms dealer, gun show vendor, or other person who has a permit to sell firearms who purchases an assault weapon or rapid-fire trigger activator from a manufacturer of assault weapons that operates in Colorado shall be reported to the department of revenue. The department of revenue shall take appropriate actions as required by law. The prohibition does not apply to: A member of the United States armed forces, a peace officer, or other government officer or agent, to the extent that the person is otherwise authorized to acquire or possess an assault weapon and does so while acting within the scope of the person's duties; A person who is an active member of the United States armed forces while on duty and serving in conformance with the policies of the United States armed forces; The manufacture, sale, or transfer of an assault weapon or rapid-fire trigger activators by a licensed firearms manufacturer to any branch of the United States armed forces, or to an entity that employs peace officers, for use by that entity or its employees a peace officer or to an entity that employs peace officers; The manufacture, sale, or transfer of an assault weapon by a licensed firearms manufacturer to any branch of the Unites States armed forces; The transfer of an assault weapon to a licensed firearms dealer or gunsmith for the purposes of maintenance, repair, or modification, and the subsequent return of the assault weapon to the lawful owner; Any federal, state, or local historical society, museum, or institutional collection that is open to the public, provided that the assault weapon is securely housed and unloaded; A forensic laboratory, or any authorized agent or employee of the laboratory, for use exclusively in the course and scope of authorized activities; An entity that operates an armored vehicle business and an authorized employee of the entity while in the course and scope of employment; A licensed gun dealer who has remaining inventory of assault weapons as of August 1, 2024, and sells or transfers the remaining inventory only to a non-Colorado resident and the sale or transfer takes place out of state; or A peace officer. The prohibition does not apply to the transportation of assault weapons through the state by a person who is not otherwise prohibited by state or federal law from transporting, shipping, or receiving a firearm. A person is entitled to transport an assault weapon for any lawful purpose from any place where the person may lawfully possess and carry the assault weapon to any other place where the person may lawfully possess and carry the assault weapon, provided the transportation is in accordance with federal law. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  5/7/2024 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1297 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning a study regarding the creation of a baby bonds program. J. Willford (D) | L. Garcia (D) / J. Coleman (D)  The bill directs the state treasurer to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of and to make recommendations regarding the creation of a "baby bonds" program (program), through which the state deposits a specified amount of money into a public trust account and the money is invested by the state treasurer for an eligible child, who may use the money and its earnings for certain eligible uses upon turning 18 years of age. The study must: Assess the distribution of wealth in the state; Assess the landscape of existing public assistance opportunities for wealth building for: Individuals whose family income does not exceed 195% of the federal poverty line, adjusted for family size; and Individuals belonging to groups who have historically been denied access to wealth-building opportunities or who have experienced wealth stripping and exploitation, which has led to a lack of intergenerational wealth, including individuals who are Black, Indigenous, and people of color; Examine and evaluate the feasibility of creating the program in the state; Examine investment options for the program; Determine how the creation of the program could address the racial wealth gap in the state; and Examine any other area related to a baby bonds program that is deemed appropriate by the state treasurer or a third-party entity conducting the study, including any pilot project of related programs performed in the state. The state treasurer may enter into an agreement with a third-party entity to conduct all or part of the study. At the conclusion of the study and not later than April 15, 2025, the state treasurer is required to submit a report of its findings and make recommendations to the general assembly. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  5/14/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed
HB24-1306 (2024 Session)Oppose NOT ON CALENDARConcerning an increase in the criminal penalty associated with possession of synthetic opiates. M. Lynch (R) / B. Pelton (R)  Under current law, the knowing possession of any material, compound, mixture, or preparation that weighs more than one gram and not more than 4 grams and contains any quantity of fentanyl, carfentanil, benzimidazole opiate, or an analog thereof, is a level 4 drug felony; except that, if a defendant shows supporting evidence to establish that the defendant made a reasonable mistake of fact and did not know that the controlled substance contained fentanyl, carfentanil, benzimidazole opiate, or an analog thereof, the matter must be submitted to the finder of fact in the form of interrogatory included in the verdict form. If the finder of fact determines the defendant made a reasonable mistake of fact, the defendant commits a level 1 drug misdemeanor. The bill eliminates this provision. Under current law, the knowing possession of any material, compound, mixture, or preparation that weighs not more than one gram and contains any quantity of fentanyl, carfentanil, benzimidazole opiate, or an analog thereof, is a level 1 drug misdemeanor; except that a fourth or subsequent offense is a level 4 drug felony. The bill eliminates this provision. Effective July 1, 2024, the bill makes the possession of any material, compound, mixture, or preparation that contains any quantity of fentanyl, carfentanil, benzimidazole opiate, or an analog thereof, a level 4 drug felony. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  3/6/2024 House Committee on Judiciary Postpone Indefinitely
HB24-1318 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning reasonable modifications to rental premises for an individual with a disability. D. Ortiz (D) / J. Danielson (D) Under current law, it is unlawful for a person to discriminate against a renter in the rental of a dwelling because the renter has a disability. Discrimination includes a refusal to permit reasonable modifications of existing premises occupied or to be occupied by an individual with a disability if the modifications are necessary to afford the individual with full enjoyment of the premises. The act removes the provision that allows a landlord to condition permission for a modification on the renter agreeing to restore the interior of the premises. The act also removes the provision that requires a modification to be at the expense of the individual with a disability. APPROVED by Governor May 28, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/28/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1320 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning creating a task force to study school staff safety issues, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. M. Lukens (D) | E. Velasco (D) / J. Marchman (D) | K. Mullica (D) The act creates the educator safety task force (task force) in the office of school safety (office) in the department of public safety (department). The task force consists of the following voting members: the director of the office, teachers, education support professionals, a school support professional, school administrators, a charter school teacher and a charter school administrator, a representative of an organization representing students and families from disproportionately impacted schools, a representative of a statewide organization that represents students with disabilities, an individual who works for a nonprofit that focuses on school safety, and a restorative justice professional. The task force members must be appointed by July 31, 2024. The task force also includes the following nonvoting members: the commissioner of education, a representative of the behavioral health administration, and a student who represents a community disproportionately impacted by school discipline. The task force shall convene no later than September 1, 2024, and shall meet at least 4 times in 2024 and at least 3 times in 2025 and may hold meetings with remote participation. On or before June 30, 2025, the act requires the task force to review, investigate, and make recommendations to the education committees of the house of representatives and the senate, the governor, the state board, the commissioner of education, and the department concerning: Any issue relating to the safety and well-being of public school staff, including laws or regulations that affect the safety and well-being of public school staff; The effects of the declining number of education professionals on student behaviors, as well as the impact of widespread staff shortages and the effects of class size and caseloads on disruptive learning environments; Incidents of aggressive student behaviors toward educators; The work and recommendations of existing education task forces; The impact of insufficient funding, lack of coordination of services between school and community, and the lack of wraparound services on learning environments; and The role that resource inequality may play in staff safety issues. The act appropriates $146,250 for the 2024-25 state fiscal year for administrative services related to the office from the general fund to the department to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 5, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/5/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1322 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the department of health care policy and financing conducting a feasibility study to determine whether to seek federal authorization to provide services that address medicaid members' health-related social needs, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. K. Brown (D) | S. Bird (D) / B. Kirkmeyer (R) | R. Rodriguez (D) The act directs the department of health care policy and financing (state department) to conduct a feasibility study (study) to explore seeking federal authorization to provide nutrition, housing, and tenant supportive services that address medicaid members' health-related social needs (HRSN). The state department shall report the study's findings to the joint budget committee on or before November 10, 2024. The study and report must address integrating HRSN services with existing nutrition-related, housing-related, and tenant supportive services. The act requires the state department to seek federal authorization to provide HRSN services no later than July 1, 2025, if seeking federal authorization would be budget neutral to the general fund. The act appropriates $222,920 from the general fund to the state department for use by the executive director's office (office). From this appropriation, the office may use $67,070 for personal services, $3,975 for operating expenses, and $151,875 for general professional services and special projects. The act anticipates that the state department will receive $222,919 in federal funds for the act's implementation. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 3, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/31/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1331 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the creation of a grant program for eligible nonprofit organizations to provide out-of-school time programs to students, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. R. Taggart (R) | J. Bacon (D) / B. Kirkmeyer (R) | J. Bridges (D) The act creates the out-of-school time program grant program (grant program) to provide grants to eligible 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organizations to provide academic enrichment and related services to public school students during times when school is not in session. The department of education (department) is required to administer the grant program. Grants must be used for: Academic enrichment; Opportunities for development in literacy, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and other subject matters for students and families; A safe learning environment and resources to increase student engagement in school and reduce chronic absenteeism; Programs and services that provide a well-rounded education and are designed to reinforce and complement school-based academic programs, including youth development activities, art, music, outdoor programs, recreational programs, technology education programs, physical health activities, and social and emotional wellness services; and Opportunities to develop meaningful workforce readiness and life skills. Grantees are required to annually report to the department, and the department is required to annually provide a report to the education committees of the house of representatives and the senate. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act appropriates $3.5 million from the general fund to the department for the grant program. The act requires the general assembly to appropriate $3.5 million to the department for the grant program in the 2025-26 and 2026-27 state fiscal years. APPROVED by Governor May 23, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/23/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1342 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning testing accommodations for Coloradans with disabilities. M. Soper (R) | J. Bacon (D) / D. Roberts (D) | J. Rich (R) The act requires a testing entity to grant an individual's request for a testing accommodation on a licensing exam without requiring the individual to undergo a diagnostic exam or psychological assessment if the individual has a recognized disability, provides proof of having received the testing accommodation on a past standardized exam or high-stakes test, provides a recommendation letter from the individual's treating medical professional supporting the requested accommodations, and requests the same testing accommodation that the individual previously received on a similar standardized exam or high-stakes test. The act allows an individual who is adversely affected or aggrieved by a testing entity's decision regarding the individual's request for a testing accommodation to bring a civil action against the testing entity. The act allows the attorney general to investigate violations of, and allows the attorney general to bring a civil action against, a testing entity for an alleged violation. APPROVED by Governor June 7, 2024 EFFECTIVE January 1, 2025(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/7/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1349 (2024 Session)Support Wednesday, May 8 2024
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE - CONT'D
(6) in senate calendar.  
Concerning a new excise tax related to firearms, and, in connection therewith, contingent on voter approval of the new tax and the retention by the state of all revenue generated by the new tax at the 2024 general election, levying an excise tax on the net taxable sales of gun dealers, gun manufacturers, and ammunition vendors from the retail sale in this state of any firearm, firearm precursor part, or ammunition, requiring the excise tax revenue to be spent for mental health services, including for military veterans and at-risk youth, school safety and gun violence prevention, and support services for victims of domestic violence and other violent crimes, and making an appropriation. M. Duran (D) | M. Froelich (D) / C. Hansen (D) | J. Buckner (D) The act refers a ballot issue to the voters at the November 2024 general election for approval of a 6.5% excise tax on the net taxable sales of firearm dealers, firearms manufacturers, and ammunition vendors (vendors) from the retail sale of any firearm, firearm precursor part, or ammunition in Colorado. The ballot issue allows the state to keep and spend all new excise tax revenue, as a voter-approved revenue change, and specifies that the revenue, estimated at $39 million in the first fiscal year, will be used to fund mental health services, including for military veterans and at-risk youth, school safety and gun violence prevention, and support services for victims of domestic violence and other violent crimes. If voters approve the ballot issue, then the state will have the authority to impose the excise tax and the rest of the act will become effective, except that the extension of the school security disbursement program cash fund, like the provision requiring submission of the ballot issue, is effective upon passage of the act. Beginning on April 1, 2025, the act requires every vendor to file a return and remit the excise tax due on the vendor's net taxable sales of firearms, firearm precursor parts, or ammunition in the state on a monthly basis, except that a vendor making $20,000 or less in such retail sales in a previous calendar year is not required to pay the tax unless and until the vendor's retails sales exceed $20,000 in a calendar year. Sales to peace officers, law enforcement agencies, and active duty military personnel are exempt from the tax and, thus, not counted as part of a vendor's net taxable sales subject to the tax. Th act also imposes a registration requirement, making it unlawful for any person to engage in the business of a firearms dealer, firearms manufacturer, or an ammunition vendor in the state without first having registered as a vendor with the executive director of the department of revenue (executive director) on a form prescribed by the executive director. Making sales of firearms, firearm precursor parts, or ammunition without first registering with the executive director is a petty criminal offense and may also be punished by civil penalties. A vendor must file a separate registration for each of the vendor's places of business in the state, and all registrations must be renewed every 2 years. The executive director may revoke a vendor's registration, after reasonable notice and a hearing, upon a finding that the vendor has violated a provision of the excise tax statutory scheme, including by failing to file a return, remit the proper amount of tax, or preserve or allow inspection of specified books and records. A vendor's false or fraudulent return or statement or willful evasion of the excise tax is punishable by criminal penalties. All money received and collected in payment of the excise tax will be deposited, first, in the firearms and ammunition excise tax cash fund (fund) created in the act and then transferred as follows: The first $30 million in the first fiscal year and that amount as adjusted for inflation or deflation in each fiscal year thereafter to the Colorado crime victim services fund in the division of criminal justice of the department of public safety for grants to enhance or provide services for crime victims or to support crime prevention; The next $8 million in each fiscal year to the behavioral and mental health cash fund, of which $5 million must be used by the behavioral health administration (BHA), in coordination with the division of veterans affairs, to continue and expand the veterans mental health services program, while the other $3 million must be used by the BHA to continue and expand access to behavioral health crisis response system services for children and youth; and The next $1 million in each fiscal year to the school security disbursement program cash fund to fund the school security disbursement program. Subject to annual appropriation by the general assembly, the department of revenue may expend money from the fund for direct and indirect costs associated with implementing and administering the excise tax. Additionally, on June 30, 2025, and June 30, 2026, the state treasurer shall transfer from the fund to the general fund an amount of money equal to the amount of money used, if any, in the state fiscal years 2024-25 and 2025-26 from the general fund to pay the costs of implementing and administering the excise tax. The act also makes technical changes to the behavioral and mental health cash fund and related program statutes and to the administration provisions of title 39 regarding the executive director's authority to implement and administer the excise tax. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, $383,027 is appropriated to the department of revenue, of which $172,827 is reappropriated to the department of law for the purchase of legal services, for the implementation of the act. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE June 5, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE on the date of the official declaration by the governor NOTE: This act takes effect only if, at the November 2024 statewide election, a majority of voters approve the ballot issue referred in accordance with section 39-37-201, Colorado Revised Statutes, created in section 1 of this act. If the voters approve the ballot issue, thenthis act takes effect on the date of the official declaration of the vote thereon by the governor; except that section 39-37-201, Colorado Revised Statutes, created in section 1 of this act, and section 24-33.5-1811, Colorado Revised Statutes, amended in section 3 of this act, take effect upon passage. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/5/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1353 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning requirements to engage in the business of dealing in firearms, and, in connection therewith, establishing a state firearms dealer permit and making an appropriation. E. Sirota (D) | A. Boesenecker (D) / J. Bridges (D) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) The act requires a firearms dealer (dealer), beginning July 1, 2025, to obtain a state firearms dealer permit (state permit) in order to engage in the business of dealing in firearms other than destructive devices in Colorado. Engaging in the business of dealing in firearms other than destructive devices without a permit is an unclassified felony, punishable by a fine of up to $250,000. In order to be issued a state permit, the dealer must hold a federal firearms license; not have had a federal, state, or local license to deal firearms or ammunition revoked, suspended, or denied within the prior 3 years; and not have violated any state or federal law concerning the possession, purchase, or sale of firearms in the 3 years before applying for the state permit. The department of revenue (department) is responsible for issuing state permits. The fee for issuing a permit is $400, which may be adjusted annually by the department. A state permit is valid for 3 years. The department, subject to available appropriations, is required to conduct an on-site inspection of a random selection of 10% of state permit holders each year and, additionally, may conduct periodic unannounced dealer inspections. The department shall revoke a dealer's state permit if the dealer: No longer holds a valid federal firearms license; Does not permit a required inspection of the dealer's business or a required record; or Is convicted of obtaining a firearm for or transferring a firearm to a person who is ineligible to possess a firearm, transferring a firearm prior to receiving the results of a background check, trafficking in firearms, or unlawfully selling or transferring a firearm component or accessory. If the department finds that a dealer failed to post a required notice, make a report about unlawful purchase, or make a required record; transferred a firearm without a locking device; or violated other federal, state, or local laws concerning the sale of firearms or firearm components, the department shall: For a first offense, issue a warning; and For a second offense, issue a warning, suspend the dealer's permit, or revoke the dealer's state permit. The denial or revocation of a permit is subject to the requirements of the "State Administrative Procedure Act". The act requires a dealer and each employee of a dealer who, in the course of the employee's duties, handles or otherwise has access to firearms or processes firearm sales, loans, or transfers (position that involves handling firearms) to annually complete a training course developed or approved by the department. The act requires a dealer to: Secure each firearm in a manner that prevents a customer or other member of the public from accessing or using the firearm, except when the firearm is being shown to a customer, repaired, or otherwise worked on; Report to law enforcement when the dealer knows or suspects that an employee is involved in the theft of a firearm from the dealer's business; and Report to law enforcement when the dealer reasonably believes, knows or should know, or becomes aware after a transfer, that the transfer was a straw purchase. The act prohibits a dealer from selling or transferring a firearm outside of the dealer's posted business hours or to a person who the dealer knows or suspects is under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance. The act prohibits a dealer from employing a person in a position that involves handling firearms who is prohibited from possessing a weapon or who has been convicted of a misdemeanor within the 5 previous years that would result in the person being denied transfer of a firearm following a criminal history record check. The act requires a dealer's employees to submit to a criminal history record check once every 3 years. If a dealer knowingly employs a person in violation of the act, including employing a person without conducting a required background check, the department shall, for a first offense, issue a warning and for a second offense, issue a warning, suspend the dealer's permit, or revoke the dealer's state permit. The act appropriates $618,973 to the department of revenue to implement the act, which includes $64,010 that is reappropriated to the department of law for legal services. APPROVED by Governor June 7, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE June 7, 2024 PORTIONS EFFECTIVE July 1, 2025(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/7/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1355 (2024 Session)Strongly Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning reducing the competency wait list, and, in connection therewith, creating a wraparound care program and making and reducing an appropriation. J. Mabrey (D) | J. Amabile (D) / D. Michaelson Jenet (D) | B. Gardner (R) The act creates the bridges wraparound care program (wraparound program) in the office of bridges of Colorado (bridges of Colorado) to increase the success of eligible individuals referred from the criminal justice system by connecting the individuals to necessary wraparound care coordination services, resulting in case dismissal, continuity of care, and increased social stability. The act requires each judicial district to develop a process to identify and refer eligible individuals to the wraparound program as a community-based alternative to competency proceedings. The chief judge of each judicial district is required to enter into a memorandum of understanding with multiple entities within the judicial district to develop and implement a referral process to deflect individuals who are likely to be found incompetent to proceed from competency proceedings and the criminal justice system. The act requires the office of the state court administrator to ensure a court coordinator assists with identifying eligible individuals, collaborates with the entities to develop the memorandum of understanding, manages and collects data and manages reporting requirements, and provides ongoing support to each judicial district in developing and implementing the referral process. A defendant may be referred to the wraparound program with the consent of the district attorney. A defendant who is referred to the wraparound program is eligible to participate in the wraparound program if the district attorney and defense counsel agree that there is reasonable cause to believe that the defendant will be found incompetent to proceed; the defendant consents to participate in the wraparound program; and the defendant is not charged with certain felonies, unless the district attorney waives the requirement. If an eligible defendant is referred to the wraparound program and the defendant consents to participate in the wraparound program, the act requires the court to issue an order appointing a bridges wraparound care coordinator (care coordinator). The wraparound program is required to accept an eligible defendant the court refers to the wraparound program unless the care coordinator determines during the initial intake process that the wraparound program is not appropriate for the defendant due to clinical or other reasons. If the care coordinator determines the wraparound program is not appropriate for the defendant, bridges of Colorado is required to immediately notify the court and outline other interventions. An individual who is accepted to participate in the wraparound program is required to enter into a written agreement with bridges of Colorado detailing the individual's participation in the wraparound program and the program expectations, cooperate with the care coordinator in developing the components of the participant's individualized wraparound care plan, and engage with the care coordinator and the services outlined in the individualized wraparound care plan. The act requires the care coordinator to conduct a screening and assessment of the participant. As part of the screening and assessment, the care coordinator is required to create an individualized wraparound care plan for the participant that is designed to reduce barriers and facilitate access to wraparound care resources. The act requires the court to set a review hearing within 182 days after the court issues the order appointing a care coordinator. At the review hearing, the court is required to dismiss the charges against the defendant unless the court finds that the defendant has not satisfactorily complied with the individualized wraparound care plan, at which point the district attorney may file a notice of termination with the court. If the defendant has not satisfactorily complied with the individualized wraparound care plan but remains engaged, the court may continue the defendant's case for up to an additional 91 days and is required to dismiss the charges if the defendant has satisfactorily complied with the individualized wraparound care plan within the additional 91 days. To implement the act, $1,430,325 is appropriated from the general fund to the judicial department and $23,098 is appropriated from the general fund to the department of human services for use by the office of behavioral health. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1360 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning mechanisms to support the integration of Coloradans with disabilities into their communities, and, in connection therewith, creating the Colorado disability opportunity office in the department of labor and employment, moving the Colorado disability funding committee and its functions from the department of personnel to the Colorado disability opportunity office, and making and reducing an appropriation. D. Ortiz (D) | C. Clifford (D) / R. Rodriguez (D) The act creates the Colorado disability opportunity office (CDOO) within the department of labor and employment (department). The executive director of the department is required to appoint the director of the CDOO. The CDOO is required to: Serve as a resource for state agencies, private and nonprofit organizations, and the public concerning disability issues in Colorado; Convene and coordinate a disability technical advisory committee; Ensure that goals of full societal integration for individuals with disabilities are met by meeting with stakeholders from entities around the state related to disabilities and with state agencies to develop recommendations on the administration of grants, restructuring of disability-related entities, and collaboration on overlapping aging and disability issues and other cross-agency efforts; and Submit the recommendations to the governor and state agencies. The CDOO is also required to: Implement a statewide strategy to facilitate economic stability for individuals with disabilities; promote successful economic, social, and community integration; and identify and address issues related to integration; Work toward enhanced inclusion and equitable opportunities for individuals with disabilities, as well as address concerns raised by disability populations; Coordinate with other entities to identify and eliminate barriers to prosperity for individuals with disabilities; As funding allows, undertake other projects, including analyzing economic and demographic trends, gathering insight and formulating and presenting recommendations to the governor and state agencies related to issues of concern and importance to individuals with disabilities in Colorado; and Promote the implementation of disability support through community-based initiatives and nonprofit organizations, which promotion includes economic opportunities, increased access to resources, and state education and outreach. The act also transfers the Colorado disability funding committee (committee) from the department of personnel to the CDOO. The transfer includes a transfer of the committee's responsibilities, including: The program to assist persons to obtain disability benefits; The program to investigate, fund, and pilot projects or programs to benefit individuals with disabilities; and The buying and selling of select registration numbers for license plates to raise funds for the disability support fund. The act appropriates $5,538,925 from the disability support fund to the department for use by the executive director's office, which may use the appropriation for the CDOO. The act adjusts appropriations from the disability support fund and the disabled parking education and enforcement fund to the department of personnel. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE July 1, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/3/2024 Governor Signed
HB24-1372 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning regulating the use of prone restraint by law enforcement. S. Woodrow (D) | L. Herod (D) / R. Fields (D) | J. Gonzales (D) Current law subjects a peace officer who uses unlawful force or fails to intervene in the unlawful use of force to criminal and civil penalties as well as disciplinary measures through the peace officers standards and training board (P.O.S.T. board). The act defines prone restraint as a use of force. The act requires law enforcement agencies to adopt written policies and procedures concerning use of the prone position and prone restraint by officers certified by the P.O.S.T. board; sheriff's deputies, regardless of P.O.S.T. board certification; and Colorado state patrol officers. Law enforcement agencies must post the adopted policies and procedures on their publicly accessible websites or make them available upon request. The policies and procedures must address how and when to request or render medical aid for use of force involving prone restraint, when to get medical clearance for use of force involving a prone restraint when there are injuries or complaints of injuries, how and when to render appropriate medical aid within the scope of a peace officer's training for any use of force involving prone restraint, and how and when to transition a person placed in a prone position into a recovery position that allows the person to breathe normally. The act requires law enforcement agencies to review the adopted policies and procedures at least every five years and, beginning on or before July 1, 2026, to implement and train peace officers on their contents. The P.O.S.T. board must make its training on the use of the prone position available to all law enforcement agencies in the state. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 3, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/3/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-001 (2024 Session)Strongly Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning continuation of the youth mental health services program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. D. Michaelson Jenet (D) | L. Cutter (D) / K. Brown (D) | M. Rutinel (D) The temporary youth mental health services program (program), commonly known as "I Matter", is scheduled to repeal on June 30, 2024. The act continues the program until June 30, 2034. Under existing law, the selection of a vendor to create or use an existing online portal to facilitate the program (program vendor) is exempt from the requirements of the state's procurement code. The act repeals the exemption. Existing law requires the state department of human services to report to the general assembly about the program twice each year. The act requires one annual report, due June 30 of each year. The act requires the program vendor to annually deliver to the BHA information and data about the program and requires the BHA to conduct surveys of providers who participate in the program. The act appropriates $5 million from the general fund to the BHA for the program. APPROVED by Governor June 4, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 4, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/4/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-006 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning considering factors related to the capability to participate in the judicial process in determining whether to place a person into a pretrial diversion program. R. Rodriguez (D) | R. Fields (D) / R. English (D) | M. Bradfield (R) The act requires a district attorney's office, or the office's designee, to consider the use of a juvenile diversion program (program) to prevent a juvenile who demonstrates behaviors or symptoms consistent with an intellectual and developmental disability, a mental or behavioral health issue, or a lack of mental capacity from further involvement in formal delinquency proceedings. Current law allows programs to use the results of an approved and validated assessment tool to identify the appropriate diversion services a juvenile may need and the professionals who may provide the services. The act adds behavioral health services and services for juveniles with developmental disabilities to the types of services a juvenile may need and adds behavioral health treatment providers and providers who offer services to juveniles with developmental disabilities to the list of professionals who may provide the appropriate diversion services. If an adult defendant's competency is raised or a defendant is found incompetent to proceed, the act allows the defendant to enter into a diversion agreement with the consent of the district attorney and the court if the court finds that the defendant has the ability to participate and is advised of the potential consequences of failure to comply. The defendant's entrance into the diversion agreement does not waive the issue of competency to stand trial if there is a violation of the diversion agreement and proceedings on the charges resume. The diversion agreement alone is not evidence of competency. APPROVED by Governor March 22, 2024 EFFECTIVE March 22, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/22/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-007 (2024 Session)Support Wednesday, May 8 2024
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(4) in house calendar.  
Concerning creating a behavioral health first aid training program in the office of suicide prevention, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. R. Fields (D) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) / B. Titone (D) | R. Weinberg (R) The act creates the behavioral health first aid training program (training program) in the office of suicide prevention (office) in the department of public health and environment (department). The purpose of the training program is to: Improve overall community climate and promote adult, teen, and youth behavioral health, mental health, and mental well-being; Train educators and school staff; employees of community-based, youth-based, or nonprofit organizations; employees of organizations that serve underserved populations; faith-based community members; law enforcement officers; first responders; and active duty or retired military personnel (candidates) to recognize the warning signs and symptoms of mental illness and substance use among adults, teens, and youth; Train candidates on how to respond to an adult, teen, or youth who is experiencing mental health or substance use challenges; Train candidates on crisis intervention strategies and best practices; Prepare candidates to teach adults and teens how to recognize warning signs and symptoms of mental health or substance use challenges; Prepare candidates to teach teens how to find a responsible and trusted adult for assistance when a peer is struggling with mental health or substance use challenges or crisis; and Prepare candidates to teach adults how to respond to a teen or youth struggling with a mental health or substance use challenge or crisis. The office is required to contract with a Colorado-based nonprofit organization (third-party entity) to offer and administer the training program to organizations that apply to participate and are accepted in the training program that include, but are not limited to, school districts, district charter schools, institute charter schools, boards of cooperative services, the Colorado school for the deaf and the blind, local public health agencies, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, organizations that serve underserved communities, law enforcement agencies, first responder organizations, military forces, and faith-based organizations (organizations). The act requires the office to promulgate rules to establish criteria for an application process. The third-party entity shall create an application process based on the rules promulgated by the office. In selecting organizations to participate in the training program, the third-party entity shall prioritize the organization's geographic diversity, existing resources and infrastructure, and plan to implement the training program and associated curriculum. Subject to available appropriations, the training program is available at no cost to the organizations selected to participate. The office shall use pre- and post-course surveys developed by a national mental and behavioral health organization to evaluate the effectiveness of the training program. The third-party entity shall administer the pre- and post-course surveys to collect evaluation data from the organizations that participate in the training program. The third-party entity shall submit a report to the office summarizing the evaluation data collected. The office is required to include a summary of the evaluation data collected and recommendations, if necessary, concerning the training program in the office's annual report submitted to the general assembly each November 1. The training program is scheduled for a sunset review and repeal, effective September 1, 2033. The act appropriates $250,000 to the department for purposes of the training program. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 5, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/5/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-012 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the creation of a reentry workforce development cash assistance pilot program for persons who were incarcerated. J. Gonzales (D) | J. Coleman (D) / M. Young (D) | J. Mabrey (D)  The bill creates the reentry workforce development cash assistance pilot program (pilot program) in the department of corrections (department) to provide cash assistance to persons who enroll and participate in workforce services or training programs after incarceration. The pilot program provides a total payment of up to $3,000 to eligible persons for basic life expenses. The bill requires the department to contract with an organization to administer the pilot program, perform an annual survey of pilot program recipients, and produce an annual report that is submitted to the judiciary committees of the senate and house of representatives. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/7/2024 Senate Committee on Judiciary Postpone Indefinitely
SB24-015 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning increasing the number of licensed professional counselors in communities. C. Kolker (D) / M. Young (D)  The bill creates the dual licensure stipend program (stipend program) in the division of professions and occupations (division). The purpose of the stipend program is to increase the number of licensed professional counselors in communities by: Reimbursing licensed professional counselor supervisors (supervisors) who provide clinical supervision to school counselors who are seeking licensure as licensed professional counselors (dual licensure candidate); and Reimbursing dual licensure candidates for the cost of examination fees and application fees. A dual licensure candidate is eligible for the stipend program if the dual licensure candidate is a licensed special services provider and has completed a master's or doctoral degree in professional counseling from an accredited school or college or an equivalent program. The bill requires the division to contract with a Colorado nonprofit organization or membership organization (Colorado organization) to manage and administer the stipend program. The Colorado organization must have experience administrating grant programs and working with school counselors or mental health professionals. The bill requires the division to provide the Colorado organization publicly available information on supervisors who can provide clinical supervision to dual licensure candidates. The Colorado organization shall maintain the list of supervisors by confirming whether a supervisor opts in to the stipend program and provides clinical supervision to dual licensure candidates. The Colorado organization shall determine a set rate for supervisors who provide clinical supervision to dual licensure candidates. The bill requires the Colorado organization to annually collect data on: The number of dual licensure candidates participating in the stipend program; The number of supervisors participating in the stipend program; and The geographic locations of the dual licensure candidates and supervisors participating in the stipend program. The Colorado organization shall draft a report summarizing the data collected. The bill requires the division to submit the report to the education committee and the public and behavioral health and human services committee of the house of representatives, the education committee and the health and human services committee of the senate, or their successor committees. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  2/20/2024 Senate Committee on Finance Refer Unamended to Appropriations
SB24-022 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning an expansion of the ability of a board of county commissioners to regulate tobacco products. K. Mullica (D) / K. Brown (D) | E. Velasco (D)  The bill allows a board of county commissioners to adopt an ordinance or resolution to: Regulate the distribution of cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products; and Prohibit the distribution or retail sale of cigarettes, tobacco products, or nicotine products, including prohibiting the sale of any or all flavored cigarettes, flavored tobacco products, or flavored nicotine products. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  3/7/2024 House Committee on Business Affairs & Labor Postpone Indefinitely
SB24-029 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning a study of how to measure the effectiveness of the criminal justice system using metrics other than recidivism. J. Gonzales (D) | R. Rodriguez (D) / J. Amabile (D) | L. Garcia (D) The act creates the alternative metrics to measure criminal justice system performance working group (working group). The working group consists of: Representatives from the division of youth services in the department of human services, the department of corrections, the judicial department, and the department of public safety; and 2 members from an institution of higher education with expertise in the criminal legal system and two members from a community-based organization that works for criminal legal reform. The working group shall consult with stakeholders either identified by the working group or who request to participate. The act requires the working group to study metrics and methods, other than measuring recidivism, to: Supplement the current measure of recidivism; Measure risk-reduction outcomes; Comprehensively measure successful outcomes that consider various aspects of life, including employment, housing, education, mental health, personal well-being, social supports, and civic and community engagement; and More effectively measure criminal justice system performance. The working group is required to submit a report to the house of representatives public and behavioral health and human services committee and judiciary committee and the senate health and human services committee and judiciary committee on or before July 1, 2025. The report must include a summary of the working group's work and any recommendations of the working group. APPROVED by Governor March 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE March 6, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/6/2024 Governor Became Law
SB24-034 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning increasing access to school-based health care. J. Marchman (D) | C. Kolker (D) / L. Garcia (D) | M. Lindsay (D) For purposes of the school-based health center grant program (grant program), the act expands the definition of a school-based health center and the purposes of the grant program to authorize grants for evidence-informed, school-linked health-care services. Services may include primary health-care, behavioral health-care, oral health-care, and preventive health-care services for students and youth (school-linked health-care services). School-linked health-care services may be delivered through telehealth, mobile services, and referrals for health-care services at a clinic near school grounds. Subject to available appropriations, the act authorizes grant money to be directed to evidence-informed, school-linked health-care services models to expand access to school-based health care, unless the prevention services division in the department of public health and environment determines that adequate proposals have not been submitted for the grant cycle. The act also requires the department of health care policy and financing to create a service-location identifier for claims for services provided at school-based health centers or through school-linked health-care services. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/5/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-040 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning reviewing the adequacy of the appropriation for state funding for senior services every three years. J. Danielson (D) | J. Ginal (D) / J. Willford (D) | M. Young (D) No later than August 2024, and each August every 3 years thereafter, the act requires the department of human services (department), the office of state planning and budgeting, and representatives from area agencies on aging to review the adequacy of the appropriation for senior services for the prior 3 fiscal years to address the needs of senior citizens who request services pursuant to the "Older Coloradans' Act". The department is required to report the findings of the adequacy review during its "SMART Act" hearing. APPROVED by Governor May 24, 2024 EFFECTIVE May 24, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  5/24/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-047 (2024 Session)Strongly Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the prevention of substance use disorders, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. S. Jaquez Lewis (D) | K. Priola (D) / M. Young (D) | E. Epps (D) The act: Exempts veterinarians from complying with specific aspects of the prescription drug use monitoring program (program) that are specific to prescriptions for human patients; Allows the medical director of a medical practice or hospital, including a nurse medical director, to appoint designees to query the program on behalf of a practitioner in the medical practice or hospital setting; Allows the department of health care policy and financing (department) to access the program, consistent with federal data privacy requirements, for purposes of care coordination, utilization review, and federally required reporting relating to recipients of certain benefits; and Updates current language in the laws relating to the program by using more modern terminology. A county or district public health agency may establish a multidisciplinary and multiagency overdose fatality review team (local team). The act prescribes membership requirements, purposes, and duties for local teams, including a duty to report annually to the county or district public health agency served by the local team. The act requires certain entities, upon receiving a written request of the chair of a local team, to provide the local team with information and records regarding a person whose death or near death is being reviewed by the local team. Unless the chair of the local team grants an extension of time, the entity must provide the local team the requested information and records within 10 business days after receipt of the request. A person or entity that receives a records request from a local team may charge the local team a reasonable fee for the service of duplicating any records requested. A person or entity, including a local or state agency, that provides information or records to a local team is not subject to civil or criminal liability or any professional disciplinary action pursuant to state law as a result of providing the information or record. Upon request of a local team, a person who is not a member of a local team may attend and participate in a meeting at which a local team reviews confidential information and considers a plan, an intervention, or other course of conduct based on that review. The act requires each person at a local team meeting to sign a confidentiality form before reviewing information and records received by the local team. Local team meetings in which confidential information is discussed are exempt from the open meetings provisions of the "Colorado Sunshine Act of 1972". A local team shall maintain the confidentiality of information provided to the local team as required by state and federal law, and information and records acquired or created by a local team are not subject to inspection pursuant to the "Colorado Open Records Act". Local team members and a person who presents or provides information to a local team may not be questioned in any civil or criminal proceeding or disciplinary action regarding the information presented or provided. Law enforcement may not use information from any overdose fatality review for any law enforcement purpose. The department is required to publish guidance for providers concerning reimbursement for all variations of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment interventions. The act requires the existing substance use screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment grant program in the department to require implementation of: A statewide adolescent substance use screening, brief intervention, and referral practice that includes training and technical assistance for appropriate professionals in Colorado schools, with the purpose of identifying students who would benefit from screening, brief intervention, and potential referral to resources, including treatment; and A statewide substance use screening, brief intervention, and referral practice that includes training and technical assistance for pediatricians and professionals in pediatric settings, with the purpose of identifying adolescent patients who would benefit from screening, brief intervention, and potential referral to resources, including treatment. Current law authorizes the center for research into substance use disorder prevention, treatment, and recovery support strategies (center) to conduct a statewide perinatal substance use data linkage project (data linkage project) that uses ongoing collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of data for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health actions to improve outcomes for families impacted by substance use during pregnancy. The act: Requires the center to conduct the data linkage project; Requires the data linkage project to utilize data from additional state and federal programs; and Expands the data linkage project to examine the education of pregnant and postpartum women with substance use disorders. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the act appropriates: $75,000 from the general fund to the executive director of the department for general professional services and special projects; this appropriation is based on the assumption that the department will receive $75,000 in federal funds for these services; and $250,000 from the general fund to the department of higher education for use by the Colorado commission on higher education and higher education special purpose programs. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 6, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-048 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning recovery from substance use disorders, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. K. Priola (D) / C. deGruy Kennedy (D) | M. Lynch (R) The act creates a voluntary recovery-friendly workplace program (program) in the center for health, work, and environment at the Colorado school of public health. The program recognizes and assists employers that implement recovery-friendly policies to help employees in recovery from substance use disorders. The program repeals September 1, 2028. The act creates a grant program in the department of education for schools that: Educate and support students in recovery from substance use or co-occurring disorders, including self-harm and disordered eating; Intend that all students enrolled are working in an active and abstinence-focused program of recovery as determined by the student and the school; and Provide support for families learning how to live with, and provide support for, their teens who are entering into the recovery lifestyle. For purposes of public school financing, the act allows a school district to include in its annual pupil count a student who has transferred to a recovery high school before the pupil count date. The act allows a recovery community organization that receives a grant through the recovery support services grant program to use the money to provide guidance to individuals on the many pathways for recovery. Current law establishes the requirements a facility must meet before operating as a recovery residence. The act requires the behavioral health administration in the department of human services to send a cease-and-desist letter to a recovery residence operating unlawfully. The act declares recovery residences, sober living facilities, and sober homes as residential use of land for zoning purposes. The act requires the liquor enforcement division in the department of revenue to adopt rules related to the location of alcohol beverages displays. Before adopting rules, the division must convene a stakeholder group consisting of recovery providers, individuals representing recovery residences, and individuals representing specified retailers licensed to sell alcohol beverages. To implement the act: $144,321 is appropriated for the 2024-25 state fiscal year from the general fund to the department of education; $303,752 is appropriated for the 2024-25 state fiscal year from the general fund to the department of higher education; $37,980 is appropriated for the 2024-25 state fiscal year from the liquor enforcement division and state licensing authority cash fund to the department of revenue. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 5, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/5/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-053 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning an evaluation of racial equity for Black Coloradans. J. Coleman (D) / L. Herod (D) | N. Ricks (D) The act establishes the Black Coloradan racial equity commission (commission) in the legislative department to conduct a study to determine, and make recommendations related to, any historical and ongoing effects of slavery and subsequent systemic racism on Black Coloradans that may be attributed to Colorado state practices, systems, and policies. The study includes historical research conducted by the state historical society (society), commonly known as history Colorado, and an economic analysis conducted by a third party. The society may enter into an agreement with a third-party entity to conduct all or parts of the historical research. The society shall conduct at least 2 community engagement sessions for members of the public to provide input to the society. The society shall provide the commission with quarterly updates about the status of its research. The society is required to submit a report to the commission with the results of its research and any recommendations. The commission shall enter into an agreement with a third party to conduct an economic analysis of the financial impact of systemic racism on historically impacted Black Coloradans utilizing the findings of the society's historical research. The third party shall deliver the results of its economic analysis to the commission. At the conclusion of the study, the commission shall submit a report to the general assembly and the governor about the study and make the report available on a publicly accessible webpage of the general assembly's website. The report must include a description of the study's goals, the results of the historical research and economic analysis, and the commission's recommendations. After the commission submits the report, the commission shall work with any parties necessary to implement the recommendations in the report. The study is contingent upon the commission receiving $785,000 of gifts, grants, or donations for the purpose of conducting the study. The act creates the Black Coloradan racial equity study cash fund to accept the gifts, grants, or donations received for the study. The money in the cash fund is continuously appropriated to legislative council for use by the commission and to the society for conducting the historical research. APPROVED by Governor June 4, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/4/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-054 (2024 Session)Amend NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the "Diabetes Prevention and Obesity Treatment Act". D. Michaelson Jenet (D) | J. Ginal (D) / K. Brown (D) | J. Mabrey (D)  The bill requires all private insurance companies to provide coverage for the treatment of the chronic disease of obesity and the treatment of pre-diabetes, including coverage for intensive behavioral or lifestyle therapy, bariatric surgery, and FDA-approved anti-obesity medication. No later than January 2025 The bill requires the department of health care policy and financing (department) to seek federal authorization to provide treatment for the chronic disease of obesity and the treatment of pre-diabetes. Within existing appropriations and upon receiving federal authorization, the department is required to notify medicaid members in writing about the availability of the treatment. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  5/14/2024 House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed
SB24-055 (2024 Session)Support Wednesday, May 8 2024
THIRD READING OF BILLS - FINAL PASSAGE
(1) in house calendar.  
Concerning supporting the behavioral health care of individuals involved in agriculture, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. J. Marchman (D) | P. Will (R) / M. Lukens (D) | A. Hartsook (R) The act creates the agricultural and rural community behavioral health program (program) in the behavioral health administration (BHA). The BHA is required to identify a specific BHA staff person to serve as a liaison between the BHA, the department of agriculture (department), behavioral health-care providers, rural community leaders, agricultural communities, and nonprofit organizations that serve agricultural communities. The program shall: Engage in statewide community outreach to educate communities on behavioral health issues facing farmers, ranchers, other agricultural industry workers, their families, and rural communities; Establish interdepartmental relationships; and Develop an understanding of and address the root causes of behavioral health issues in the agricultural industry and in rural communities. The act creates the agricultural behavioral health community of practice work group (work group) in the department. The purpose of the work group is to convene a group of leaders and experts in agriculture and behavioral health care to improve access to behavioral health care for those involved in agriculture and their families. The work group consists of at least 7 members and shall: Compile best practices to provide behavioral health care to those involved in agriculture and their families; Identify gaps in the provision of behavioral health care to those involved in agriculture; Engage with other stakeholders involved in behavioral health care focused on those involved in agriculture; Collect data, as permitted by state and federal data privacy laws, on behavioral health-care outcomes in agricultural communities and steps taken to support those involved in agriculture through behavioral health initiatives and programs; and Report to the department and the BHA on the data collected and recommend legislative or policy changes to further improve agricultural behavioral health care. The work group is scheduled for sunset review and repeal on September 1, 2029. The act establishes the agricultural behavioral health grant program (grant program) in the department. Subject to available appropriations, the department may administer the grant program. The purpose of the grant program is to: Continue existing programs or create new programs that address the root causes of behavioral health issues in the agricultural industry or in rural communities; Strengthen collaborative efforts between organizations and communities in addressing the root causes of behavioral health issues in the agricultural industry or in rural communities; and Improve access to health, wellness, and behavioral health care for farmers, ranchers, other agricultural industry workers, and their families. The act requires the department to contract with a statewide agricultural organization to convene an in-person annual summit for organizations with an interest in promoting and providing behavioral health care to agricultural communities. The department and the BHA are required to enter into an interagency agreement to share data collected in the course of addressing behavioral health-care issues in the agricultural industry and in rural communities. The interagency agreement must state that the data shared will be aggregated and anonymized, and data sharing must be in compliance with state and federal data privacy laws. On or before January 1, 2026, and each January 1 thereafter, the department is required to submit a report summarizing data collected by the work group, and data collected from grant recipients, to the agriculture, water, and natural resources committee and the health and human services committee of the house of representatives and the agriculture and natural resources committee and the health and human services committee of the senate, or their successor committees, and the BHA. On or before January 1, 2027, and each January 1 thereafter, the department shall include in the report a summary of the data collected regarding the in-person annual summit. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the general assembly appropriates $61,989 from the general fund for use by the department to implement the act. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, the general assembly appropriates $145,116 to the department of human services for use by the BHA to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-061 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the creation of a Colorado drug donation program. R. Rodriguez (D)  The bill creates the Colorado drug donation program (program) to facilitate the safe donation and redispensing of medicine, including prescription and nonprescription or over-the-counter drugs, FDA-approved drugs labeled for investigational use, and medical devices. Under the program, a donor donates medicine to a donation recipient for redispensing to eligible patients. Donated medicine is prioritized first for Colorado residents who are indigent, uninsured, underinsured, or enrolled in a public health benefits program (eligible patient). An eligible patient or the patient's health insurance is not charged for the medicine, other than handling or dispensing charges and other customary charges. Donors may include individual members of the public as well as drug manufacturers and distributors, pharmacies, clinics, health centers, government agencies, and other donors described in the bill (donor). Donors may donate to a donation recipient, including a wholesaler or distributor, hospital, pharmacy, clinic, and health-care provider or prescriber's office, among other entities (donation recipient). The donation recipient may: Transfer donated medicine to another donation recipient; and If the donation recipient is a prescription drug outlet, repackage donated medicine as necessary for storage, redispensing, administration, or transfer or replenish medicine previously dispensed to eligible patients. The bill includes provisions relating to: Record-keeping requirements for donated medicine; The type, condition, and age of medicine that may be donated; The segregation of medicine and inspection by a licensed pharmacist before medicine is accepted into inventory; The disposal of medicine that does not meet donation standards; and The repackaging, labeling, and redispensing of medicine to eligible patients. The state board of pharmacy is required to promulgate rules necessary to implement the program. When acting in good faith, without willful or wanton misconduct, the state board of pharmacy, donors, donation recipients, and other individuals and entities involved in the program are not subject to civil or criminal liability or professional disciplinary action relating to their participation in the program. The bill makes conforming amendments to existing law relating to the reuse of unused medications by other patients in correctional facilities and in certain licensed facilities, such as hospitals, hospices, and assisted living facilities. (Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced.)  4/10/2024 Senate Committee on Health & Human Services Refer Amended to Appropriations
SB24-063 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the confidentiality of discussions in a peer support setting. J. Rich (R) | J. Coleman (D) / R. Taggart (R) The act prohibits a peer support team member or recipient of group peer support services from being examined as a witness without the consent of the person to whom the examination relates. APPROVED by Governor March 22, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  3/22/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-068 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning end-of-life options for an individual with a terminal illness. J. Ginal (D) / K. Brown (D) Current law authorizes an individual with a terminal illness to request, and the individual's attending physician to prescribe to the individual, medication to hasten the individual's death (medical aid-in-dying). The act modifies the medical aid-in-dying laws by: Providing an advanced practice registered nurse with the same authority to evaluate an individual and prescribe medication as a physician; Adding language specifying that if any end-of-life options conflict with requirements to receive federal money, the conflicting part is inoperative and the remainder of the law will continue to operate; and Reducing the waiting period between oral requests from 15 days to 7 days and allowing attending providers to waive the mandatory waiting period if the patient is unlikely to survive more than 48 hours and meets all other qualifications. The act also prohibits certain insurers from: Denying or altering health-care or life insurance benefits otherwise available to a covered individual with a terminal illness based on the availability of medical aid-in-dying; or Attempting to coerce an individual with a terminal illness to make a request for medical aid-in-dying medication. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2024 EFFECTIVE August 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/5/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-093 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the continuity of health-care benefits during the transition to a new health benefit plan when the enrollees's health-care provider does not have a contract with the new health insurance carrier. D. Michaelson Jenet (D) / J. Amabile (D) The act allows an enrollee in the state medicaid program or with a private health insurance carrier whose coverage has been terminated or not renewed to receive continued care with the enrollee's same health-care provider or health-care facility under the enrollee's new health benefit plan at the in-network level under the enrollee's new health benefit plan for specified time periods if certain conditions exist. APPROVED by Governor April 4, 2024 EFFECTIVE January 1, 2025(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  4/4/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-110 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning prohibiting prior authorization for antipsychotic prescription drugs used to treat a mental health condition, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. R. Rodriguez (D) | B. Kirkmeyer (R) / J. Amabile (D) | E. Sirota (D) The act prohibits the department of health care policy and financing (department) from requiring an adult to be prescribed an antipsychotic prescription drug that is included on the preferred drug list and used to treat a mental health disorder or mental health condition if: During the preceding year, the adult was prescribed and unsuccessfully treated with an antipsychotic prescription drug that is included on the preferred drug list and used to treat a mental health disorder or mental health condition and for which a single claim is paid; or The adult is stable on an antipsychotic drug used to treat a mental health disorder or mental health condition that is not included on the preferred drug list. The act appropriates $1,092,134 to the department. This appropriation consists of $888,555 from the general fund and $203,579 from the healthcare affordability and sustainability fee cash fund. The department may use this appropriation for medical and long-term care services for medicaid-eligible individuals. It is anticipated that the department will receive an additional $2,295,189 in federal funds for the implementation of this act. APPROVED by Governor June 3, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 3, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/3/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-117 (2024 Session)Strongly Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning protections for individuals with an eating disorder, and, in connection therewith, requiring an eating disorder treatment and recovery facility to hold an appropriate designation and requiring the behavioral health administration to regulate the use of involuntary feeding tubes. L. Cutter (D) | F. Winter (D) / C. deGruy Kennedy (D) No later than January 1, 2026, the act requires the behavioral health administration (BHA) to require all eating disorder treatment and recovery facilities (treatment facility) to hold an appropriate designation based on the level of care the treatment facility provides. Licensed clinicians who are not facility-based and offer behavioral health therapy on an outpatient basis are not required to hold a designation. The act directs the state board of human services to promulgate rules for treatment facilities and requires the BHA to promulgate rules concerning involuntary feeding tubes for individuals with an eating disorder. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 6, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-136 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the "Uniform Guardianship, Conservatorship, and Other Protective Arrangements Act". B. Gardner (R) | J. Ginal (D) / M. Young (D) | M. Soper (R)  Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill repeals the "Uniform Guardianship and Protective Proceedings Act" and enacts the "Uniform Guardianship, Conservatorship, and Other Protective Arrangements Act", drafted by the uniform law commission. The bill provides guidance for guardians and conservators and clarifies how appointees must make decisions on behalf of a person under guardianship or conservatorship. The bill encourages the use of protective arrangements and less restrictive alternatives instead of conservatorship or guardianship if a person's needs can be met with support services and technology. The bill expands the procedural rights for respondents to ensure that guardianships and conservatorships are only imposed when necessary. The bill provides for expanded monitoring of guardians and conservators to ensure compliance with fiduciary duties and prevent exploitation. The bill provides for visitation and communication rights for individuals subject to guardianship or conservatorship. This includes a limitation on a guardian's ability to prevent communication, visitation, or interactions between a person subject to guardianship and a third party. The bill provides for protections to prevent exploitation of vulnerable individuals by allowing the court to restrict access to the respondent or the respondent's property by a specified person without imposing a guardianship or conservatorship. The bill prohibits courts from establishing full guardianship or conservatorship if a limited guardianship or conservatorship would meet the respondent's needs, requires a petitioner seeking full guardianship or conservatorship to provide support to justify full guardianship or conservatorship, and requires courts to provide findings to support the imposition of full guardianship or conservatorship. The bill updates provisions concerning minors subject to guardianship and provides for involvement of a minor in decisions that involve the minor. The bill provides guidance for property management for individuals subject to guardianship. The bill contains model forms for petitioners and respondents to use when filing petitions and notice with the court. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  5/4/2024 House Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely
SB24-141 (2024 Session)Amend NOT ON CALENDARConcerning out-of-state health-care workers providing health-care services through telehealth to patients located in Colorado. K. Van Winkle (R) | D. Michaelson Jenet (D) / M. Bradfield (R) | M. Rutinel (D) The act allows a health-care provider (applicant) who possesses a license, certificate, registration, or other approval as a health-care provider in another state (out-of-state credential) to provide health-care services through telehealth to patients located in Colorado if the applicant registers with the regulator that regulates the health-care services the applicant will provide (regulator). An applicant is eligible for registration if: The applicant submits an application in a manner prescribed by the division of professions and occupations (division) in the department of regulatory agencies (department) and pays the applicable fee; The applicant possesses an out-of-state credential issued by a governmental authority in another state, the District of Columbia, or a possession or territory of the United States that is active and unencumbered, that has educational and supervisory standards equivalent to or exceeding the educational and supervisory standards required for the equivalent credential in this state or the interstate compacft license for the applicable credential type, and that entitles the applicant to perform health-care services that are substantially similar to health-care services that may be performed by a licensee, certificate holder, or registrant in this state; The applicant designates an agent upon whom service of process may be made in Colorado; The applicant has not been subject to any disciplinary action relating to the applicant's out-of-state credential during the 5-year period immediately preceding the submission of the applicant's application that has resulted in the applicant's out-of-state credential being limited, suspended, or revoked, unless the disciplinary action pertains to an action, behavior, or treatment permitted under Colorado law; and The applicant demonstrates passage of a jurisprudence examination administered by the division if passage of a jurisprudence examination is required for substantially similar credentialing in this state. An applicant who has been registered to provide health-care services through telehealth to patients located in Colorado (registered provider) shall: Provide health-care services in compliance with the professional practice standards for health-care services in this state; In the event of an emergency situation, make a good faith effort to contact and coordinate with emergency services located near the originating site, or facilitate contact with the appropriate local mental and behavioral health services, and remain on a synchronous connection with the patient, if the emergency arises during a synchronous connection, until emergency services have reached the originating site or the situation is resolved in the registered provider's clinical judgment; Maintain a written emergency protocol that is appropriate to the applicable standard of care for Colorado; Notify the applicable regulator of restrictions placed on the registered provider's out-of-state credential in any state or jurisdiction or of any disciplinary action taken or pending against the registered provider in any state or jurisdiction; Maintain and have in effect a form of financial responsibility that covers services provided to patients in this state as required by the applicable regulator; Disclose to the patient that the registered provider does not have a physical location in Colorado and disclose the location of the registered provider; and Not open an office in this state and shall not provide in-person health-care services to patients located in this state unless the health-care provider obtains the license, certification, or registration that the applicable regulator requires for the performance of the relevant health-care services in this state. The act also allows the division or the regulator to take disciplinary action against a registered provider under specified conditions. The department may notify other states in which the registered provider is licensed, registered, or certified to practice of any disciplinary actions taken against the registered provider in this state. A registered provider is prohibited from prescribing a controlled substance. APPROVED by Governor June 7, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 7, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/7/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-162 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning best practices for responding to discriminatory conduct in schools, and, in connection therewith, developing training consistent with the best practices and making an appropriation. J. Marchman (D) | F. Winter (D) / J. Bacon (D) | L. Herod (D) The act requires the department of education (department) to enter into an agreement with an organization (selected organization) to develop best practices for local education providers to effectively respond to reports of harassment or discrimination. The department shall convene an evaluation committee to select the organization. The evaluation committee consists of representatives from school districts, an organization that advocates for students who face harassment or discrimination, and the office of school safety; persons with lived experience of harassment or discrimination; and students. The selected organization shall submit a report to the department, the office of school safety, and the general assembly's education committees that includes an explanation of the best practices developed by the selected organization. Current law requires public schools to provide training to all employees about harassment and discrimination, beginning no later than July 1, 2024. The act repeals that deadline and instead requires harassment and discrimination training beginning with employee training for the 2025-26 school year, but beginning no later than December 31, 2025. The act requires that harassment and discrimination training that occurs after August 1, 2025, be consistent with the best practices developed by the selected organization. The act requires the selected organization to develop a harassment or discrimination training program for use by schools that is consistent with the best practices developed by the selected organization and that complies with the requirements for public schools' harassment and discrimination training. The department shall make the training program materials available to public schools at no cost. The act appropriates $111,111 from the state education fund to the department for training for local education providers on responding to harassment and discrimination reports. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 6, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-167 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning portable requirements for direct-care health-care workers in assisted living residences, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. J. Ginal (D) | J. Smallwood (R) / K. McCormick (D) The act authorizes the department of public health and environment to require each operator of an assisted living residence (operator) to require each direct care worker who provides direct care services to residents of an assisted living residence (direct care worker) to: Take a tuberculosis test; and Undergo fit testing for a respiratory mask. The act requires each operator to require each direct care worker to complete direct care training to provide specific services to residents. The individual or entity that provides training is required to provide each trained direct care worker with a certificate of completion of training that may be presented to another assisted living residence to consider for the purposes of satisfying the residence's training requirements. For a direct care worker who has been issued a certificate of completion, an operator may require an employee to complete new training or may require the completion of a competency test prior to the employee providing direct care services. APPROVED by Governor June 6, 2024 EFFECTIVE January 1, 2025(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/6/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-175 (2024 Session)Support NOT ON CALENDARConcerning measures to improve perinatal health outcomes, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. R. Fields (D) | J. Buckner (D) / B. McLachlan (D) | I. Jodeh (D) The act requires health benefit plans to provide coverage for doula services in the same scope and duration of coverage for doula services that will be included in the department of health care policy and financing's request for federal authorization of doula services (request) under the "Colorado Medical Assistance Act" (medical assistance program). Doulas providing services must meet the same qualifications for and submit to the same regulation as individuals providing doula services as recommended under the medical assistance program. Coverage for doula services will be implemented for large employer health benefit plans issued or renewed in this state on and after July 1, 2025, or 12 months after submission of the request, whichever is later. For small group and individual plans, doula services will be implemented if the division of insurance and the federal department of health and human services determine that the benefit does not require state defrayal of the cost of the benefit or the division of insurance determines defrayal is not required and the federal department fails to respond to the division's request for confirmation of the determination within 365 days after the request is made. The act authorizes the department of public health and environment (department) to partner with the designated state perinatal care quality collaborative (perinatal quality collaborative) to track the statewide implementation of the recommendations of the Colorado maternal mortality review committee, implement perinatal health quality improvement programs with hospitals that provide labor and delivery or neonatal care services (hospital) to improve infant and maternal health outcomes, and address disparate care outcomes among certain populations and of those living in frontier areas of the state. No later than July 1, 2025, and no later than July 1 each year thereafter, the act requires hospitals to submit specified data to the perinatal quality collaborative concerning disparities in perinatal health care and health-care outcomes and beginning December 15, 2025, to annually participate in at least one maternal or infant health quality improvement initiative (initiative), as determined by the hospitals. The act authorizes financial support for hospitals in rural and frontier areas of the state, hospitals that serve a higher number of medical assistance patients or uninsured patients, and hospitals with lower-acuity maternal or neonatal levels of care. The act requires the department to contract with the perinatal quality collaborative to issue an annual report, no later than July 1, 2026, and no later than July 1 each year thereafter, on clinical quality improvements in maternal and infant health outcomes and related data, as well as other information that can be shared with hospitals and health facilities, policymakers, and others and posted on the internet. The act includes protections for the confidentiality of certain data collected or shared under the act. No later than July 1, 2025, the act requires the medical services board to promulgate rules to include coverage under the medical assistance program of over-the-counter choline dietary supplements for pregnant people and to seek federal approval for the coverage if necessary. For the 2024-25 state fiscal year, $1,328,652 is appropriated from the general fund to the department, for use by the prevention services division, with the assumption that the division will require 0.9 FTE, to implement the act. APPROVED by Governor June 5, 2024 EFFECTIVE June 5, 2024(Note: This summary applies to this bill as enacted.)  6/5/2024 Governor Signed
SB24-181 (2024 Session)Amend NOT ON CALENDARConcerning the creation of the Colorado alcohol impact and recovery enterprise, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. K. Priola (D) | C. Hansen (D) / C. deGruy Kennedy (D) | J. Amabile (D)  The bill creates the Colorado alcohol impact and recovery enterprise (enterprise) in the department of revenue behavioral health administration in the department of human services to: Collect a fee from manufacturers and wholesalers that distribute alcohol within Colorado; and Use the fee for alcohol and related substance use disorder prevention, early intervention, treatment, harm reduction, and recovery services and programs in communities throughout the state. The bill exempts small manufacturers and wholesale distributors of alcohol based on production and distribution level amounts for which a manufacturer or distributor may pay reduced tax or claim an exemption under federal law beverages. The bill also: Creates the alcohol impact enterprise board and specifies membership and duties of the board; and Requires the state auditor to conduct an audit of the enterprise in the 2030-31 state fiscal year and every fourth state fiscal year thereafter. The bill also exempts the enterprise from the prohibition on an enterprise receiving more than $100,000,000 in revenue in fees in the enterprise's first 5 fiscal years without first receiving voter approval. (Note: Italicized words indicate new material added to the original summary; dashes through words indicate deletions from the original summary.) (Note: This summary applies to the reengrossed version of this bill as introduced in the second house.)  5/4/2024 House Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely